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  1. Turner-n-Burner

    Turner-n-Burner New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Messages:
    184
    Loc:
    North of Boston
    So for those of you without a woodshed, what's the prefered stacking method out there?

    long rows with lots of space in between, or face cord against face cord to save space? Does covering just the top really work, or do you wind up chasing the covers more often than not? do single rows have a tendency to topple?

    If you were building a woodshed, would you size it to stack the wood tightly, or would you try and leave room between rows?

    Has anyone tried using part of their driveway for their woodpile? I have the room, and I was thinking that the heat rolling off of the black asphalt could help things dry more quickly - maybe even a holzhoufen or two?

    -Dan

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  2. fbelec

    fbelec Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2005
    Messages:
    1,704
    Loc:
    northern massachusetts
    i stack in line. i have those stackit brackets you buy at ace hardware for cheap. they are metal corners. you make the size you want with 2 x 4 installed in the brackets. mine are 4 foot tall x 16 foot long and i have one row on them. i stack it about 5 feet high with 18 to 24 inch splits close to a cord a row. i use 3 foot wide black plastic on top and screw the ends in very tight around the end 2 x 4 and use fender washers with the screws. 2 or 3 bricks spread out on top and have never had a problem with wind no matter how strong
  3. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,248
    Loc:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    I build pallet size stacks bout 6' high. Pallets are free,and keep the wood off the ground. If the rain holds out this weekend, I'll take a pic of my pile. I have to go up on the roof this weekend and that's a great place to take a pic of the wood pile from. I'm not too anal about a perfect pile, but I'd like em a bit neater if possible in the future....It's my first year, so...I'm learning (mostly from the veterans here)
  4. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    all poster have given good advice
    5 important factors to consider when yours is log length and green.
    your fastest drying condition rely on
    #1 getting air space between the logs
    #2 keeping them off the ground or surface
    #3 locate them in a sunny place
    #4 smaller size splits dry out faster
    #5 start the process as soon as posible

    stacking method should allow air and sun an oppertunity to do its thing once the drying process in maturing cover the top when anticipating a soaking rain remove the top all other times for maxium drying. Fine rain should not be a concern
  5. got wood?

    got wood? New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2006
    Messages:
    164
    Loc:
    Acton, MA
    Elk, you just answered a nagging question for me...the issue of covering your wood. I have standard tarps folded over and bungeed in such a way that only the top of the log rack is covered (no part of the tarp wraps around the sides of the stack). In the past I'd just leave ithe cover on because 1) I figured most of the pile is exposed and getting enough air/sun from the sides anyway and 2) I'm lazy and don't want to cover and uncover if rain is in the forecast. I take it from your quote above that leaving the racks uncovered for as much as possible and only covering if a soaker is expected makes an appreciable difference? Looks like it's time to roll back my tarps!
  6. Martin Strand III

    Martin Strand III New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Messages:
    763
    Loc:
    NW MI near nowhere
    Covering your woodpile outside is optional. I've done it both ways (covered/uncovered) over the years and as long as Elk's suggestions are followed, the covering won't matter if the pile is out long enough in the sun and gets a breeze. Once dried a few months, contrary to popular neurotic thinking, split wood won't soak up that much water from rain/snow to make a difference.

    Fussin' with tarps, loose roofing boards and sharp metal edges on steel/aluminum pieces that can sail off in a blow isn't my idea of working hard or smart. I put bark side up on the top 2 rows and bring a few days worth of wood inside for the last drying spell before burning.

    Burning dry wood not only is a "better" fire but it helps conserve kindling too.

    Aye,
    Marty
  7. adrpga498

    adrpga498 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    869
    Loc:
    New Jersey
    I just finished building my 1st holz hausen from 2 linier staked cords. The bottom third is 5 months seasoned the top 2 thirds was split last month. I must say it looks pretty cool and I don't have to worry about leaning or falling stacks. I will "re stack under my deck by the house in December before the snow starts. But for now, the holz hausen can bake and catch the breeze all summer without cover.
  8. martel

    martel Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2006
    Messages:
    207
    Are we to understand that that wood will have been stacked thrice by the time it is burned?
  9. adrpga498

    adrpga498 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    869
    Loc:
    New Jersey
    Yes , only this time for the experiment of the holz hausen. Next time I will build the HH as I process.
  10. martel

    martel Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2006
    Messages:
    207
    pictures of the Hausen?
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