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Stihl yellow green codes

Post in 'The Gear' started by junksta, Sep 15, 2007.

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  1. junksta

    junksta New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
    Messages:
    44
    Loc:
    Pinedale, AZ Elev. 6400'
    I traded for a pretty new ms390 with no paperwork. I went to the dealer with all the numbers off the bar to buy a spare chain. They sold me chain with a green code saying the yellow is for "perfeshnuls" and that was fine by me. Now, when using the new chain, the saw will bind easy.

    I noticed the bar has yellow dots so am I to assume I need a different bar for the green chain?

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  2. sloth9669

    sloth9669 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2007
    Messages:
    9
    Loc:
    Groveland ma
    I got a green bar and yellow chain.....from what they told me as long as the bar and chain are the same size it does not matter ( 3/8 or .325 ) most common. The difference in green and yellow chain is the extra raker between cutters to reduce kick back. They try and sell green chains to homeowners only because of the reduced risk. With that reduced risk comes slower cutting speed. "pros" that cut all the time that can handle the kickback risk and need the faster cutting speed use the yellow. Thats my best stab at it iam sure others will add to this or correct me if iam wrong.

    Happy cutting
  3. computeruser

    computeruser Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2007
    Messages:
    337
    Loc:
    East Lansing, MI
    Ignore the color codes, they mean nothing in the real world and precious little in the Stihl dealership. If your chain is the same pitch and gauge as your bar, then you will be fine. The only things that matter in purchasing a chain are pitch (relating to the distance between rivets), gauge (how thick the drivers are; they should be the same size as the bar they're riding in), and drive link count (how many drivers on the chain, i.e. the true length). The only other factor to consider would be cutter profile, which is a preference issue for most firewood cutters, though certain types of cutting more or less require a particular cutter profile for best results.

    When you say "bind" what do you mean? Is the saw now capable of bogging with a new chain, or is the chain rocking in the bar groove and binding in the log because of the chain being sloppily fitted to the bar? If it is the latter, I'd double-check to make sure you don't have .050 or .058gauge chain in a .063 bar...it happens.
  4. junksta

    junksta New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
    Messages:
    44
    Loc:
    Pinedale, AZ Elev. 6400'
    Thanks, I examined the blades real carefully and you are right, I can see no difference in guage, pitch or link count. The binding I was talking about was inside the sprocket case, looked like the chain was trying to come out of the guide on the bar, and binding at that point. I switched back to the yellow chain until I find out for sure. I may not have had the green chained on exactly right, I'll reinstall it again and try when I have the chance.
  5. keyman512us

    keyman512us Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2007
    Messages:
    804
    Loc:
    North Worc. CTY MA
    ...A couple of "pointers". Not directing anything in particular "towards you" but sometimes folks do some pretty strange things when it comes to chainsaws.

    Is everything "lining up just right"??? (Stihl has a fairly good system for a bar tensioner but it can be 'tricky' sometimes).

    Anytime you remove the bar cover or the bar itself..."Give it a good cleaning"...get all the 'Smaltz' out from between where the saw body and bar...and the bar to the case areas meet. All that sawdust and oil mixed together can sometimes "knock things out of whack". You don't have to make it 'spotless'...just take your scrench (the screwdriver/spark plug tool) and scrape out all the junk.

    Make sure the 'tensioner pin' and the bar are aligned correctly. Put the cover back on and tighten the cover "thumb tight"....work the adjustment "in and out" pulling on the chain a bit (sideways away from the bar...using a gloved hand). It should move fairly easily.

    If it does...with the engine OFF and the chain brake off...(using a gloved hand) pull the chain around the bar a few times and see how it does. It should "spin around" fairly easily...indicating a good alignment of the bar.

    Might sound kinda stupid...but as I said...not everybody is an ace with a chainsaw...
  6. junksta

    junksta New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2006
    Messages:
    44
    Loc:
    Pinedale, AZ Elev. 6400'
    Keyman, I appreciate the caution and tips. I try to be as careful as I can, but it seems like I need three hands sometimes to put on a chain. Probably me and not the saw.
  7. keyman512us

    keyman512us Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2007
    Messages:
    804
    Loc:
    North Worc. CTY MA
    Naghh...Not you...you're not alone. Try putting a 36" bar and chain on...a third hand would be a godsend at that point..lol

    Like I said...Stihl uses a fairly good system...but it can be a PIA sometimes. Thats why I use a similiar method to the one I described anytime I gotta pull the cover...learned by "trial and error"(and a few colorfull words too). :)
  8. chad3

    chad3 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2007
    Messages:
    453
    Loc:
    Southeast CT
    If you have some of the bigger saws, check out these bar studs. Part # 1138 664 2400. These have a much larger shoulder on them and make it easier to put the bar on the saw with the chains. It also helps as the tops are smooth for easier time putting on the nuts.
    Seeing if it may help.
    chad
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