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Stove Pipe Temperatures?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by croghanite, Nov 10, 2010.

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  1. croghanite

    croghanite New Member

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    What temperature should a single wall stove pipe be reading 18" above the stove? I'm burning a Jotul Oslo. My pipe goes up about 30" to a 90 degree bend through the wall and dumps into a masonry chimney which goes up from there another 8'

    What is the maximum temp a single wall stove pipe should get too in my situation and for how long? I usually get the pipe to 500 - 550 upon initial start up and close down the air to run the stove top temperature around 450.

    I would like to run the stove top temp to 600 as Jotul says the best range is 400-600.

    **All temp readings are the surface temperatures.

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  2. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

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    275 to 500 is what my manual says for my flue. and this is surface readings as well.
  3. croghanite

    croghanite New Member

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    I would think there would be some chart online somewhere that shows the safest max temperature a single wall pipe should reach and how long it could maintain that temp without damaging the pipe.

    I can't find anything on the subject!!!!!!!!
  4. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

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    You don't need a chart. Just when the pipe glows red that's an overfire.
  5. croghanite

    croghanite New Member

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    Surely some professional on this board has the information....
  6. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    Most pipe thermometers have a color coded chart along with the numbers that tell you the good bad and ugly. My external pipe thermometer goes red or too hot at 550. I don't burn a Oslo but my pipe temps run anywhere from 225-350 after I engage the cat and settle in with a fresh load. Stove top temps range from 500-650. Non cats generally burn a little hotter pipe temps from my experience.
  7. AngusMac

    AngusMac New Member

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    I use a thermometer on the stove surface (just above the door on my Jotull f118)

    It burns very cleanly and I keep it below the 550 deg mark and above 300 deg.

    It is easy to control and generally wont rise above 550 deg (for example if I forget to shut the vent having gone away to do something)
  8. kenny chaos

    kenny chaos Minister of Fire

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    I have an externally mounted flue pipe alarm set at 350.
    At that temperature, I can close the bypass, set the air to a predetermined location, and get the burns I want.
    If I want a higher stove top temperature, I still close the bypass which stabilizes my flue temperature,
    and don't shut the air down as much.
  9. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    I use the guide lines on the sensor also, 250 to 550 for a magnetic sensor on a single wall pipe. It sounds like you are running your stove correct, you can cheat a little on the high end but for the most part 550 to 600 is as high as I feel comfortable with, my IR gun shows my condar temp sensor to read 50 degrees low at 500.
  10. Battenkiller

    Battenkiller Minister of Fire

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    You're not finding anything because the subject probably hasn't been analyzed that way. For safety reasons, UL specifies that manufactured chimneys must be able to sustain a continuous flue gas temperature of 1000ºF. That would correspond to about a 500-600º external temp on single-wall black stove pipe. But that doesn't mean your pipe is going to get trashed if you exceed this temperature, not by a long shot.

    To me, the biggest worry in not how hot the pipe gets (low-carbon steel can take a ton of heat indefinitely), but what's inside that hot pipe. UL also specifies that chimneys must withstand flue gas temps as high as 2000º for ten minutes. Keep a dirty pipe and get those temps much above 1000º inside and you may very quickly get to test that pipe at 2000º.
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