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Stove works better the colder it gets

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Mrtwostick, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. Mrtwostick

    Mrtwostick New Member

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    Philadelphia suburbs
    I'm aware that a stove will draft better when its colder outside but it seems the colder it gets outside the more HEAT my stove puts out. We've been burning since the temps were in the fifties. Just morning and night fires and it seems the house wouldn't go over 76 or 77 degrees. Now that it's gotten cold I can get the house up to 82. I did get a select stash of 3+ year old locust and oak to mix with the wood I cut over the summer but it doesn to seem to matter what I put in there my stove just races to 750 and stays there for a little while.

    Does anyone else notice this? I've read a few threads where people are struggling to keep warm. I do have to reload 4 times a day to maintain 78-80 ( poor insulation)

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  2. rijim

    rijim Member

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    RI
    My guess is that you have less than ideal draft and the temp differential when it gets colder makes the difference.
    Mrtwostick likes this.
  3. dorkweed

    dorkweed Guest

    So what's your problem again???!!!! Reads like you're doing everything right!!!

    IMNTBHO, keeping your whole house at 75+ degrees is wasting wood.
  4. Mrtwostick

    Mrtwostick New Member

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    No problem. i was just wondering if anyone elses stove seems to work better the colder it gets. We like heat and the house is most comfortable around 75-80. I don't know how some folks do it burning full tilt and only getting to 70
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  5. Augie

    Augie Feeling the Heat

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    LOL add a three foot section of flue and your shove will run better in milder temps. Or just. Keep on keeping on
  6. tfdchief

    tfdchief Minister of Fire

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    Well, you obviously aren't as old as I am ;lol
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  7. etiger2007

    etiger2007 Minister of Fire

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    Clio Michigan
    sit back with a chilly beer and enjoy
    tfdchief likes this.
  8. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Welcome to the forum Mrtwostick.

    Definitely most stoves will do better when it gets cold outdoors because of the temperature difference.

    We too like it nice and warm in the house; or at least I do. Wife would have it cooler but bends to suit me. We had to quickly go away a couple hours and just got home. The house feels a little cool and the temperature is 78 in here! We normally keep the house over 80. And no dorkwood, we do not consider this wasting wood. We consider this one more benefit of burning wood.

    As for those folks only getting to 70, it amazes me too especially when some of them report the temperature outdoors. Doesn't even sound that cold but it seems many have problems heating when the temperature gets down to 20. I also have to laugh every fall when people start burning in their nice new stove and are amazed at the amount of heat they are getting; yet, the outside temperature is in the 30's or 40's. I'm thinking that they report their homes maybe at 75 and I wonder what their home will be like when it does get cold outside.
  9. etiger2007

    etiger2007 Minister of Fire

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    You nailed it Dennis, I was to amazed by my stove when it was 40 out but lately Im thinking to myself if I made the right choice. The stove does a good job but I want heat like you get, maybe Ill never get it with an insert. I threw caution to the wind tonight and packed it full with ash, she's cooking at 690, wonder how long it will last?
  10. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Ya, let us know what the temperature is in the house when you get up.
  11. remkel

    remkel Minister of Fire

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    I am one of those people that has trouble when it gets below 18 or so. The boiler usually kicks in aroun 3am, but I get up at 5 so I just live with it.
  12. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    With my setup when it's cold out (like -20*) I have to be careful about leaving the air wide open for more than a few mins. The draft is strong enough that it pulls flames into the chimney and gets it HOT quick!
    Usually I'll open it wide open to stir around the ash/coals and load it up and then set it on #2 (about 50%ish closed) till the wood is burning well and then turn it down.
  13. ArsenalDon

    ArsenalDon Minister of Fire

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    You seem to be doing well on only 4 loads per day....enjoy the success of a wood stove..
  14. Mrtwostick

    Mrtwostick New Member

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    thanks guys. My hot air furnance does come on around 4 in the morning when the temps are below 30 or so. Its been around 10 degrees at night for the past week. If I had to be gone all day at work I would never be able to keep the house above 70 as my stove only puts out real ussable heat for 4-5 hrs. The coals last 12-14 hrs but they are useless for my situation.
  15. blwncrewchief

    blwncrewchief Burning Hunk

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    Northern, IN
    If you can run the stove up to 750* and you are reloading 4 times a day you are are at the absolute max for this size stove. What you are seeing is the heat loss of your house. I have the exact same stove heating 1,500 sq. ft. with 10' ceilings and my only struggles are not running us out of the house with this stove. At 0* with 20-30 mph winds a load to the top of the firebricks or just over of locust pushed the house to 76 to 80* on a 8 hour burn cycle with stove top temp peak of 650*. I could heat 2,500+ sq. ft. of my house down to 0* on 4 full loads a day easy. You say you want a BKK and it is a great stove, just be aware if you have that much heat loss you are still going to be burning 2+ loads a day in a BKK and will save very little wood. The place the BK's really shine is on the other end of the spectrum, not the one you have. On your end you will automatically pick up the larger firebox so you will be loading 50% more wood on each load. This in turn will extend your btu's on a load by 50% resulting in 50% longer burn time per load. So if you are getting 6 hour burn times now that would be extended to about 9 hours with a King. If we are generous and say the King will be 10% more efficient at this burn rate it would push it to 10 hours or so. I am only warning you as what to expect in real life. Don't spend $3-4K+ on a King and expect to get 24 hour burn cycles when you are getting 6 now.
  16. Mrtwostick

    Mrtwostick New Member

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    Loc:
    Philadelphia suburbs
    You are right. My house is about the same size as yours. My problem more so than insulation is my stove is in a less than ideal location. Its off to the side in my kitchen and all the heat has to be moved from the kitchen around a corner to the living area and then up the steps. If the stove was in my living room it would be 90 throughout the whole downstairs. I keep telling my wife this would be the ideal set up. we could probably burn a low smoldering fire in even the coldest weather. We don't plan on being here forever so Im not complaining too much. Our next house will likely need 2 stoves or a central furnance
  17. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    I'm not quite 40 and 75 is my sweet spot - easy to get spoiled with wood heat! Cheers!
    tfdchief and remkel like this.

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