1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Stupid question: is it hard to replace a gasket?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Swedishchef, Oct 30, 2012.

  1. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    2,745
    Loc:
    Quebec, Canada
    Hey guys

    The questions is short and sweet: I have a new door gasket and was wondering how hard it is to install it?? Any tips or advice?

    Thanks a ton!

    Andrew

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    7,607
    Loc:
    Doylestown, PA
    1. Pull out old gasket.
    2. Remove old cement.
    3. Apply new gasket cement.
    4. Place in new gasket.
  3. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1,763
    Loc:
    Connecticut
    I did ours a couple of weeks ago. Just make sure to clean out the groove for the gasket, apply new glue, and set in the new gasket......I was told to start/end at the lower part of the door at the hinge....I let our sit for 12 hours with the door shut (not sure if it's correct, but it's what I did)....also, the door felt real tight to shut with the new gasket in place....felt much better after the first fire
  4. My Oslo heats my home

    My Oslo heats my home Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    Messages:
    1,584
    Loc:
    South Shore, MA
    +1 ditto...
  5. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    6,209
    Loc:
    Carver, MA.
    From a post I did a while back:

    I used the gasket glue that came with my Imperial gasket kit I bought at Lowes and the instructions were to clean out all the old glue, dust etc. then apply a thin layer glue to the entire surface that the gasket needs to bond to.. Then let the glue setup until tacky, apply the gasket without stretching it and place newspaper between the gasket and the door and close it for a few hrs.. The newspaper prevents the glue from sticking the door to the stove or the gasket to the other surface.. Hope this makes sense it worked OK for me..

    Ray
    My Oslo heats my home likes this.
  6. Heatsource

    Heatsource Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2011
    Messages:
    807
    Loc:
    Northern CA
    i like to do a dry fit/dollar bill test of the gasket before gluing, as most have some play
    raybonz likes this.
  7. charly

    charly Guest

    I use a Dremel with a small wire wheel if the glue is crazy. I never use glue again,,,, instead a few dabs of high temp silicone. Next time the clean up is a breeze. Once that gasket takes a set from the door always being shut, it's not coming out. If there is a door adjustment I will back it out to get the most out of the gasket doing the dollar bill test. Why over compress the new gasket beyond what you need? Adjusting it until you get the dollar bill fit leaves you adjustment down the road. When the gasket install is done the stove gets fired up. Never had any problems. When I had a wood gasification boiler, Mark from AHONA heating sold really nice replacement door gaskets, they were impregnated with orange silicone. They sealed beautifully. Lasted for ever, no creosote build up on the gasket either. Key was they never got hard, stayed pliable to maintain a nice seal without being overly tight.
  8. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Messages:
    4,981
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    When I put the new gasket in, I scrunch it shorter so it's puffy. The puffyness will squish down and make a wider seal. Otherwise you could stretch the gasket too thin and not have it make a good seal. I use more gasket, but gasket is cheap.

    Matt
    Huntindog1 and raybonz like this.
  9. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    2,745
    Loc:
    Quebec, Canada
    Thanks for the advice.
    It is something that sounds easy but I am sure I could mess up. And if I mess up then I am up the crapshoot without a spare Gasket. At $40 each, I don't wanna ruin this one that I got for free.

    Charly: my gasket did some with high temp silicone and not glue. I am hoping that the initial install had silicone and not glue as well...

    PLus I will back off my door handle as it allows me to tighten the seal more and I have done so in the past couple of years to tighten the seal around the door.

    Now to find time in the next few weeks to get that done...

    Andrew
  10. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    Messages:
    510
    Loc:
    Southern NY
    I changed the gasket on the front door of my stove and got more than I bargained for. If there are screws that hold the glass in place make sure you use some sort of spray to loosen the screws. Had 6 out of the 10 screws break which basically lead to a new front door as well as glass. All posts above are dead on for what to do.
  11. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    2,745
    Loc:
    Quebec, Canada
    Luckily my door gasket is not near my glass gasket...
  12. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2011
    Messages:
    510
    Loc:
    Southern NY
    Very valid point!
  13. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Messages:
    4,981
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    Where did you find your gasket? $40 is quite a bit higher than I remember my last gasket costing, but I haven't replaced one in a few years. Maybe they went up in cost?? Did you buy one from the manufacturer, stove shop, or hardware store? The stove shop usually has it on a roll, the hardware store has it in little packages. I used cheap gasket cement from the hardware store for mine, it was probably Rutland brand.

    Matt
  14. charly

    charly Guest

    Dry fit it first, cut it long at the end, you can always seem to get the extra in, if not, just cut some off. Nice thing is the silicone gives you some time to work with the gasket. Have faith,, you can do it!
  15. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    2,745
    Loc:
    Quebec, Canada
    My gasket is from SBI (Osburn). It's the original one. I think that is why they are a little more pricey. It is also 9 feet long, I presume I have enough for 2 gasket replacements?? Also, I noticed that the gasket has quite the elasticity to it, almost like a bungee cord. Do I simply put it in or stretch and put it in?

    Sigh, I am making this complicated for nothing...

    Andrew
  16. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    5,740
    Loc:
    Northern MI - in the mitten
    Andrew, post #8 by Matt. Make sure to not stretch the gasket.
    You can work the gasket around some after it's in the groove/channel. I loose fit the gasket, then cut slightly oversize to make it easier to handle.
    As others have said, clean the groove/channel, then get any dust out with a damp rag/paper towel. Run a small bead of cement in the groove, then place the gasket in. Scrunch the ends together, and as charly said, cut it again (sharp scissors) to get a slight overlap, then scrunch.
    It's not difficult, so don't sweat it.
    Is there a reason you have to use the gold plated (expensive) gasket? I've used Imperial, and Rutland in the package. Also used some from a roll I got at the hardware.
    raybonz likes this.
  17. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Messages:
    4,981
    Loc:
    Schenectady, NY
    You might get 1.5 doors out of a 9 foot gasket. Don't try to cheap out by stretching it. Scrunch it so you don't have to do it over and buy another gasket. The fatter that gasket is, the better it will seal.
  18. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    7,213
    Loc:
    Salem NH
    X2, the Dremel works good. You can also get a wire wheel brush for your drill. The high temp RTV is easier than cement because it does not run or drip!
  19. charly

    charly Guest

    Don, I can't understand the big push on cement or glue,,,,,,,,it's not like the gasket is hanging upside down out in the open. Door gaskets spend 95% of their life compressed against another surface. Why make it brutal the next time you change the gasket? On an outside wood boiler I had, when it came time for a new gasket,,,,, I laid the door flat cleaned out everything,,, then installed a slightly undersized gasket ,,, next on top of the gasket I filled the whole face of the gasket with high temp silicone, actually filling the 1/8-1/4 channel depth all the way around. Then took a putty knife and scraped it flush with the outer edge. Nice neat finish. Let it dry for 24 hours. I now had a nice silicone faced gasket that stayed pliable and sealed well. The trick is not too much silicone depth wise, so it will cure. The gasket acts like a backer rod. One note, my door was closing against a raised lip on the stove face. But I'm thinking sometime to just coat the whole gasket face itself with black high temp silicone, smoothing it on neatly, letting it dry overnight and then seeing how it will hold up. That could be used against a flat surface. I'll have to call Mark at AHONA sometime and see if he has a source for standard size wood stove siliconized gasket.

Share This Page