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Table Saw Recommendations

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by lukem, May 28, 2013.

  1. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    The Shopsmith is very cool. Not so practical for most jobs, but very cool.

    A Leatherman tool has a screwdriver, pliers, etc., all in one package. Now imagine they're your ONLY screwdriver, pliers, etc.

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  2. loadstarken

    loadstarken Member

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    True true. My biggest complaint is that it's not portable but the fact that it's compact makes up for it not taking over my garage.

    I'm glad the previous owner bought all of the upgrades because it cost him a pretty penny!
    Earlier this year I bought a super old version and shortened it down and use it exclusively as a drill press.
  3. blades

    blades Minister of Fire

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    Thin Kerf blades, 2 styles ( 10"), first is the complete plate at about .075 thick with a kerf in the .087-.095 range what we do to keep these from fluttering is add stabilizer discs on either side of the blade. Second style is Thin Rim, 2-2.5" depth is the .075-.087 plate thickness and then the plate steps up to the .095 or so range ( built in stabilizer section). On the 12" chop saw stabilizer discs are sort of a must have especially for the in-expensive Dewalt and Old Ham and similar priced blades of the thin kerf variety.
    Joful likes this.
  4. Foragefarmer

    Foragefarmer Member

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    This, I agree with everything said in this post. But then again I also have a Powermatic and run Forrest blades. I would say wait it out on CL and try to find a decent saw.
    Joful likes this.
  5. timfromohio

    timfromohio Minister of Fire

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    To me the table saw the heart of a shop. Agree with other posters and get something decent - not saying you need a 3hp cabinet saw (though these make me drool), but I'd stay away from a cheapy direct drive saw. I have a Ridgid TS3612 - there table saw that's 2 or 3 generations old - has the cast wings, but they are not solid they are the hex pattern. It has excellent rip capacity - 36" right of blade. Blade tilts both ways, great fence, and with a good sharp blade it does very well. For ripping very large sheet goods I almost always cut down with a clamping straight edge and my circular saw, then do fine cuts on the table saw.

    http://www.ridgid.com/ASSETS/88E78849BA6F4A5696DDF96F7D8755AB/TS3612_Table_Saw_Man.pdf
  6. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    Ended up finding a lightly used Delta 36-979 with a nice fence system. $250.
  7. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Good to here that, That's a good price for a good saw.

    Does it have cast iron wings ?? did it come with maybe, a 30” Beisemeyer Fence ???
    Does it have a mobile base ???
    Inquiring minds want to know :)

    Put a set of machined steel pulleys and a PowerTwist link belt on it and you’ll be amazed how smooth it will run.

    Where is the pics :)
  8. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    Cast wings...delta t2-30 fence...mobile base...router table not pictured...and kreg precision miter gauge. Can't imagine it running much smoother or quieter than it does now.

    Attached Files:

    HDRock likes this.
  9. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Very nice :)
    Check this out, Saw Performace Packages and Pulleys & Belts
    You can reduce vibration by up to 80% in your bandsaw, contractor's saw, drill press, jointer or lathe with Power-Twist drive belts and these accurately machined pulleys.
  10. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    It does need a new belt...current one has a couple knarly spots in it.
  11. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    Had this for only a couple days, but I've used it quite a bit and so far I really like it. I didn't realize how crappy the picture above was when I posted it, but you can see that the top had some light rust. It also had a fair amount of wood glue and general crap on it. I got the big chunks off with a razor blade and cleaned the rest up with 000 steel wool and mineral spirits, followed by a light coat of paste wax. It is slicker than snot now and makes ripping and miter cuts very easy and precise.

    The miter gauge that came with it is really nice...I like it a lot. I'm sure there are better ones out there, but I can't see myself needing anything more than this.

    It has a thin kerf blade. I'm not sure I like it. Seems to have too much flex side-side. This has a 1.5 horse motor wired for 1210VAC, but can be wired for 240. Couple questions on that:

    1. Would it run OK with a regular kerf blade on 120VAC?
    2. If not, would it run OK with a regular kerf blade on 240VAC?
    3. Should I wire it up for 240VAC anyway, keeping in mind that 2420 isn't as "portable" as 120?

    It has a dust collector setup on the bottom that directs a good majority of the dust into a pile right below the saw. I don't have a dust collection system, but is there a good relatively inexpensive bag I could fasten directly to the 4" port?
  12. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

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    1. Voltage has no bearing on horsepower, assuming your cordage is sized appropriately.
    2. Standard kerf blades do require more HP than thin kerf. If you're not seeing it struggle with thin kerf, I'd try a standard kerf. You can always step back to thin kerf for cuts in thick or difficult woods.
    3. Depends on your situation. I wire everything that will stay in the shop at 240V, but keep stuff that will be used away from the shop at 120V, for the reason you implied.

    These dual-voltage motors simply have three windings, two being run windings, and one being a starter winding. The motor wiring is configured such that each winding always sees 120V, and this is done simply by putting the two run windings in parallel for 120V operation, or series for 240V operation. The starter winding is kept in parallel with one of the run windings (usually handled internally, so you can't mess it up), so it always sees 120V, as well.

    The only "down side" to running at 110V, as you can now see, is that you need to pull double the current to feed the two run windings in parallel. This is more an issue of cordage and circuit capacity, than it is for the motor. The motor will still generate the same HP, assuming you can deliver the power to the motor. Because you're pulling twice as much current, your extension cords I^2*R resistive losses are higher, and that's the down side of 110V. Also, you need to buy heavier gauge and more expensive cords, etc.

    On the dust collector, I find a full-size (2.5" hose) shop vac works very well, as a dust collector for most saws. Just buy a rubber drain pipe coupling reducer, and modify to fit the saw/vacuum.
  13. blades

    blades Minister of Fire

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    Check around your local shops other wise the net for a pair of or at least one stabilizer plate ( an old 5-7.25" fine tooth plywood blade with the teeth ground off works real well). Mount that on the non motor side of the arbor against the thin kerf blade and that will settle it down some. Just got to remember to use a diameter that is not going to interfer with your depth of cut.. Two plates works better, one on either side it you have enough arbor length, most do as it is less than a standard set of stack dado blades or even (heaven forbid) one of those adj. wobble dado units. ( I am a little biased on these).
    Joful likes this.
  14. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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    As am I. Tried one, didn't like it. A stacked dado setup is well worth the extra $.
  15. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Kreg makes good stuff , that's a nice miter gauge, here is the instructions http://www.kregtool.com/prodimages/kms7102 miter gauge manual.pdf
    A 1.5hp I would just run it on 110.
    I run one 5" dampener/stiffer HERE even with a standard blade unless I need the full depth of cut, definitely use one with a thin kerf, if U use two with one against the arbor it will throw off your rip fence scale.
    A standerd kerf blade will do fine cutting 3/4 to 1 1/2 stock
    As said a shop vac will work for dust collection , U can buy an adapter or make one out of a large plastic cup, done that
  16. blades

    blades Minister of Fire

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    That Kreg miter rig is over a c note by itself new, I have one also and it is very nice. Plus has t slots in it so you can set up/make all kinds of jigs to go with it. The ability to adjust it to fit snug in miter slot in saw table top is also a plus, most slap around a bit.

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