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The BIG Oak

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by intermediatic, Nov 2, 2012.

  1. intermediatic

    intermediatic New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2011
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    Loc:
    New Jersey
    Alright, I've seen the monster pines and the big trees Sandy took down.

    How's this one? At least I saw it go down. I'd say it's 3' in diameter, maybe more. The biggest, oldest tree in the property. So sad. At least I saw it go down. Kind of amazing in a car crash sort of way.

    [​IMG]

    You want it? You're welcome to have it right now. We're in Northern New Jersey. Only one hitch. It's lying on top of an electric pole, a transformer, and the cables leading to them. Probably ok though, right?

    So assuming there are no takers, what do you suggest we do once PSE&G gets to it? I'm thinking they will carve up just enough to get the cables back up (why don't they put em underground… beats me?).

    But what then? Would love to see this milled, but it's at the bottom of my property which means the bottom of a steep hill, no road access. Probably going to have to add it to my growing wood pile.

    Any ideas on how to tackle a tree that big with my Husky 435? I have an 18" blade, but how much good is that going to do me?
    Backwoods Savage likes this.

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  2. nrford

    nrford Minister of Fire

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    Feb 26, 2011
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    NW lower Mi.
    18"+18"=36", 36"=3". your bar should do the job. Seen many a 20" bar cut 40" trees down.
    Thistle and Backwoods Savage like this.
  3. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    I've cut much bigger trees than that one, with a 70cc saw and a 20 inch bar. It can be done, when you take your time and use your head. Get you some wedges and some good solid advice on proper techniques (lots of good guys on here to help walk you through it). The big thing is, be VERY careful around that thing until the power company does their thing and gets the danger out of there. Stay with us, there's lots of good firewood in that tree. We'll help you through it.
  4. swagler85

    swagler85 Minister of Fire

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    NE Ohio
    I took an oak this summer that was 40" with a 20"bar you can do it.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  5. Senatormofo

    Senatormofo Member

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    Jan 16, 2012
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    Loc:
    Cockeysville, Maryland
    That looks like a nice project you have on your hands! Take your time and you should be fine. You came to the right place for advice!
    Backwoods Savage and NYLife like this.
  6. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    A fun challenge.
    Cut up what you can with your saw. Might be able to buck it all the way.
    Maybe have PSE&G cut on the big end a few times & you can do the rest.
    Thistle and Backwoods Savage like this.
  7. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Michigan
    Welcome to the forum intermediatic.

    Those big oaks can make a pretty good noise when they come down. I love it!

    Tackle that thing! Remember, if it is 3' at the butt, it is smaller than that as you go up. That is some prime firewood and you should get it all. Stack it up and burn it 3 years from now; you'll not be sorry.
    Thistle likes this.
  8. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    As others have said . . . with your "blade" (actually called a bar) being 18 inches you can actually go as far in as you can and then do the other side. A lot more work to be sure. I might start (after the utility gets done) at the top and work your way down to the butt . . . both as a confidence booster and it will make rolling the tree a bit easier. A cant dog or peavey would help a lot in rolling the tree . . . heavy equipment would be even sweeter.
  9. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    beyond the obvious disapointment of a great tree coming down I would be stoked to had a giant oak land in my yard. There is probably a years worth of heat in that thing - 3+yrs from now.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  10. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    Grab everything down to 2" diameter if you can.The big monsters arent as easy & can be dangerous,but take your time,think things through & you'll be through it in no time.Lots of work but you'll have a LOT of incredible wood in 3 yrs to look forward to on those bitter cold nights.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  11. intermediatic

    intermediatic New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2011
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    Loc:
    New Jersey
    Hi all, thanks for the encouragement.

    PSE&G came and put up a new pole. They cut up some of the upper parts of the tree to get to the site. I took the opportunity to watch their chainsaw operator take on the limbs and asked him a few questions. In the meantime, my Husky 635 fried somehow and is unable to start. I wound up getting a Stihl 290 from a servicing dealer within walking distance. I'll fix the other saw when service shops have time to look at it and will either eBay it or keep it as a backup. The Stihl is a dream. At this stage, I've managed to saw up much of the upper section of the tree as well as some other things it took down.

    Did I mention how happy we were to have the Morso fireplace insert we put in last year after the last power outage? We took the old smoke dragon Leyden down to the lower fireplace (our hillside house is inverted…kids bedrooms below, ours and living room above) for events like this. With the two going, we never got below 62 in a house that had no heat whatsoever for ten days, the majority of which were in the 30s at night and no more than 50s during the day. I made sure the smoke dragon was stoked hot so it wouldn't build up creosote. It'll probably get used a couple of more times this year max. It was a big difference in smoke output and wood consumption between the Morso 5660 and the Leyden though.

    I'm thinking of getting a two man cross cut saw for the biggest section of the trunk though. If it's not rotten, it could make awesome table tops.

    The pole raising is below.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  12. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    West Friendship, Maryland
    An electric line running through all those trees. Then we wonder why there are so many power outages. Not much forward thinking when they were putting up those lines.

    As everybody else said. Take your time and tackle what you are confident about doing. The hardest part, getting the tree on the ground, has already been done for you. The Stihl should be an awesome saw for you and I think you can run a 20" bar on the 290 without too much trouble.
  13. intermediatic

    intermediatic New Member

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    New Jersey
    Nope, not much forward thinking. I'll look into the 20" bar. Thanks for the tip.
  14. intermediatic

    intermediatic New Member

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    Arrgh. Bad memory. It's not the 290. The 250.
  15. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Definitely not a 20" on the 250. It might work on a 290 but not a 250.

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