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The "Birthing Tree"

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Pagey, Nov 17, 2009.

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  1. Pagey

    Pagey Minister of Fire

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    Here's a site with some nice pics of a big oak tree known as the "Birthing Tree" in one of our neighboring counties. Supposedly settlers would stop under the tree on their travels, and children were often born under its shelter.

    That's the only oak I've seen in person with branches so large the ground has to help support them.

    http://videoscott.com/oak.htm

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  2. rphurley

    rphurley Feeling the Heat

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    Wow, that's quite a tree. I've never seen branches resting on the ground before. Thanks for sharing it with us.
  3. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    There's lots of firewood there!
  4. joshlaugh

    joshlaugh New Member

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    That is one nice looking tree.
  5. drewboy

    drewboy New Member

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    Cool. We have a state champion white oak in the next town over-rumored to be 400 yrs old,it's been in the local papers a lot lately due to it's decline in health. Some town officials mentioned cutting it down and you should have heard the uproar!
  6. Pagey

    Pagey Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, this one recently lost a branch, and The Southern Standard had a big write up. Can't blame them, it's a unique tree with an interesting history.
  7. bigtall

    bigtall New Member

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    It is common to see massive live oak trees along the coast in Georgia and other southern states with several limbs drooping down and "resting" on the ground. I was down at Jekyll Island a couple of weeks ago and there are some monsters down there that cover half an acre or more. I believe that I have some pics somewhere that I will have to post.

    Pagey- do you know if that is a Live Oak, or is it a massive Red Oak? I am curious to know if there is a Live Oak that far from the coastal plain.
  8. k3c4forlife

    k3c4forlife Member

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    Cut it, split it, and stack it... Burn it 2010-2011
  9. Pagey

    Pagey Minister of Fire

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    Taken from: http://travel.webshots.com/photo/2229197220017353410IUHfJq

    "Standing as a silent sentinel to the town (McMinnville, TN), this enormous white oak (Quercus alba) welcomes travelers into the city of McMinnville. While only 81 feet tall, the crown spreads 130 feet, with several of the lower limbs larger than many trees. However it is not its size that gives this white oak notoriety; the Birthing Tree is steeped in local folklore. The tree was a local landmark for settlers passing through the area. Travelers from North Carolina, Kentucky and Virginia would travel through Knoxville on the Old Kentucky Trail. These trails converged at Rock Island (the closest city at that time) and then passed under the spreading branches of this giant tree before continuing south to Alabama. The huge oak was a well-known meeting place for these weary travelers. Some waited for long periods of time for fellow settlers to join them. Others lingered because of bad weather or lack of supplies. Many local families also recount stories of grandparents who new someone born at the tree due to the extended delays. At one time it was even thought to have been part of the infamous "Trail of Tears" on the march to Oklahoma, although local historians discount this. However, the tree has been known for over 150 years and many local stories, rumors and family meetings have been held at the tree."
  10. muncybob

    muncybob Minister of Fire

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    Lately I see a large tree and think of how much firewood I could get....but when you see a tree like this you just have to smile and appreciate it. If only it could talk to tell of the things it has "seen".
  11. derecskey

    derecskey New Member

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    There is an oak tree about 15' off my back property line (near a ravine, near a property line (several actually) and you never could have got that thing out of there if you wanted to) that is 10' across at the base. It dropped a "branch" from about 20 feet up a few years ago that stretches across the ravine and is easily 26-28" in diameter. If it ever goes in my lifetime, I hope it falls in a southeasterly fashion, across the ravine, so maybe I can have at the tops! :)
  12. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Ah, but it's an oak . . . you would be better off burning it in 2011-2012. ;)
  13. lexybird

    lexybird Minister of Fire

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    we have a similar tree in our area that is said to be the oldest in the state ,rumored to be hundreds of years old with huge leads everywhere like that one
    some guy recently bought the property it resides on and the historical society will not permit him to cut it
  14. karri0n

    karri0n New Member

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    Take a look at the Angel Oak, I believe it is one of the oldest known living things in the world. It's over 1500 years old. LOTS of the branches that rest on the ground on this tree. And no, this is one I wouldn't dare think to use for firewood.

    http://www.angeloaktree.org/gallery.htm
  15. Pagey

    Pagey Minister of Fire

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    I knew I saw that somewhere once before, but I couldn't remember the name and location! Thanks!
  16. polaris

    polaris Feeling the Heat

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    It's had it's time in the sun, I think it's time to process it. Just kidding. (I think)
    Joe
  17. jadm

    jadm New Member

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    Thank-you for the picture. What a magnificent tree.

    I am amazed by the branches that are resting on the ground. Why don't the break??

    Around here any branch that is pointing down rather than upwards gets trimmed. :roll: (Has to do with snow fall and having them break and fall on ones house....) ( Oaks are not native here so we do not have an abundance of them - a lot of silver maple, ash, elm, linden, cottonwood and, that really dangerous species - the evergreen family of trees.)
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