The lil HI300 that could... insulation question

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by TTigano, Nov 28, 2013.

  1. TTigano

    TTigano
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    Well folks, this is my third year burning with this stove and as my firewood stack seasoned over the past few years, so did my love for this stove. I'm actually surprised at how well it heats the house. I've yet to turn the heat on yet in our 4 bedroom cape. My concerns though are this....just recently I realized how poorly my attic and eaves are insulated..... As a matter of fact, there is none in a large part. I am considering blown in as it is very tight in the attic and I'm not the smallest individual. I had an insulation company come out and quote $800 to do the job eaves and all but I just curious.... Don't the eaves need to be vented? Does blown in insulation still allow air movement? I don't want a few years to go down the road and all of a sudden produce respiratory problems due to mold. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Happy Thanksgiving to everyone.
     
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  2. egclassic

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    Yes I believe the eaves need to allow air in, as to vent the attic through the roof vents.
    They actually sell pre-formed baffles that attach to the trusses to prevent blown in insulation from blocking vents at the eave.
    Although these may be harder to install in a cape cod style home, than say a Ranch style.
     
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  3. CenterTree

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    The eaves would need vented, but you MUST have a ridge vent ALSO. You must have both.
    Air moves across the ridge and draws from the eave vent.


    We installed new shingles last year and took advantage to add both ridge vent AND eaves vents. We have a cape cod so we had to use a special eaves vent. (since there is no room for a conventional fascia vent there.)

    I will try to find the info.
     
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  4. #4 CenterTree, Nov 28, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 10, 2013
    CenterTree

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  5. TTigano

    TTigano
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    There are soffit vents and ridge vents as well as vents on either end of the the house in the attic.... My question is this... The soffit vents need to be able to flow air up to the attic, i get that... but does the actual roof "plywood" need vented as well.... because I could run some pipe down the eaves to vent but since the house is finished and sheetrocked I cannot install the styrofoam vents that you staple to the underside of the plywood. I'm not sure if that makes much sense but I tried...lol
     
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  6. NRGarrott

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    Yes, the actually roof deck needs to be vented, it prevents moisture from building up on the underside of the roof deck, causing the plywood to go bad. It also prevents the shingles from getting too hot and curling. Also you don't want gable vents and ridge vents. It short circuits the venting system.
     
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