The real stacks!

Cross Cut Saw Posted By Cross Cut Saw, Jun 14, 2012 at 8:12 PM

  1. Cross Cut Saw

    Cross Cut Saw
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    Mar 25, 2012
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    Loc:
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    So I might not have wood to last me through 2074 like some of you guys but I got some stacks here that are sure to make at least a few of you drool...
    2012-06-13 12.20.47.jpg 2012-06-13 14.33.50.jpg 2012-06-13 14.34.24.jpg
    That's about 1/2 of the 275, 150lb. bags of un-roasted coffee I received yesterday.
    I get to play with fire all day at work roasting coffee!
     
    zap likes this.
  2. bogydave

    bogydave
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    Oh to be down wind in the morning:
    I love the smell of roasting coffee in the morning. :)
     
  3. MasterMech

    MasterMech
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    150 lb bags, wow. _g I remember 100lb bags of feed. They stopped using those figuring they caused unnecessary wear & tear on the farmers. :confused:

    How big is a bag?
     
  4. mtarbert

    mtarbert
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    Feb 23, 2006
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    Sure would be nice to have coffee for the weekend (any) that I knew was roasted on Wednesday ! And a couple of cloth bags the beans came in......Mike
     
  5. Cross Cut Saw

    Cross Cut Saw
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    Mar 25, 2012
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    They're about 42" x 40" bags, it's all "green" so the equivilent roasted would take up about twice the space after expansion and moisture loss.

    The coffee goes through two popping phases, one at about 390 degrees when it expands and loses moisture, the second at about 430 degrees when it starts to become exothermic and generate it's own heat which I often describe to people as being similar to the crackling of a fire log...

    We give away all of the burlap bags, I don't throw any away, you can come up with a million uses for them...
     
  6. buggyspapa

    buggyspapa
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    Nov 26, 2011
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    That is a lot of beans! What company do you roast for?

    By the way, how is the wood collection going? Have you managed to get any in?
     
  7. PapaDave

    PapaDave
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    Feb 23, 2008
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    I neglected to read the text AFTER the pics.....first go round. Thought that was bags o' pellets.
    That much coffee, in MY garage....................wow. No sleep for you!
     
  8. ScotO

    ScotO
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    [​IMG]
     
  9. Cross Cut Saw

    Cross Cut Saw
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    Mar 25, 2012
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    Loc:
    Boulder, CO
    I'm going to have to buy my wood, that's just the way it is right now, but I did find a good deal in Georgetown, only about 10 miles south of me that makes sense and I'll save over $100 per cord for some nice wood that has been cut and stacked for 9 months already!

    I have bought and stacked 3 1/2 cords for $750, I'd like to keep it around $1000 per year which would save me about $2500 per year over using propane, and my house will actually be warm, not 62 degrees...

    I just keep looking for people moving on Craigslist...

    http://maine.craigslist.org/zip/3080651888.html it would cost me $300 just to go pick it up in a uhaul, which is a lot to spend for "free" wood, if only the uhaul guy would trade me coffee for using the truck...
     
  10. amateur cutter

    amateur cutter
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    Aug 20, 2010
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    Coffee for a truck, dang I wish you where a little closer. A C
     
  11. Dune

    Dune
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    Jan 14, 2008
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    Are those still known as grass bags? I used to buy bales of them. We used them to ship surf clams but the processors gradually shifted to re-usable metal cages.
     

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