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  1. f100

    f100 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Messages:
    3
    This is my first post but I have been reading the informative posts of others for several years now. Here is my predicament, I have an older home built in 1920, I installed a JotulF100 in the existing brick fireplace which has outside exposure on 3 sides. The first 4 feet of chimney was relined with flexible stainless steel liner (to bend around the smoke shelf) and then connected to rigid stainless steel liner to the top of the brick chimney. The brick chimney, being close to ninety years old, is looking a little worse for wear. Rather than tear the brick chimney down the the roof line, would thermix be a way to reinforce and at the same time provide some additional insulation to the stainless steel liner. The existing liner is uninsulated now but I have not had a draft problem in the 4 seasons that I have been burning. Thanks for your help.


    Eric in MT.

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  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,288
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    I think a poured cement and insulated liner would strengthen the entire masonry structure.

    But, if the chimney already has a tile liner, perhaps not. In other words, the best results are when the poured liner can become integral with the masonry structure around it.

    Even better are systems like Ahrens, which involve an installation tool which presses the cememt against the interior walls.

    In your case, it might be good to do some work from the outside - such as waterproofing, crown repair and possibly repointing.
  3. jabush

    jabush Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2006
    Messages:
    385
    Loc:
    Howard County, MD
    My insulation was poured in around the liner. IIRC my tiles are 7"x7" so there was not a whole lot of space to fill. My point being that it most likely did not add any structural integrity to my chimney because in most places the insulation is less than an inch thick. If you have a larger flue...say a 10"x10" I would think that the thermix would give you enough mass to help beef up the chimney once it sets up. Of course, the thermix won't keep your chimney from falling away from your house, if that's the issue.

    just a thought...
  4. f100

    f100 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Messages:
    3
    Thanks for the responses. The chimney in question is a brick fireplace chimney without a clay liner. The inside dimensions are approximately 10" x 24". The part above the roofline is what I was concerned about. Weather and age have caused some corrosion on the brick and the mortar above the roofline. As near as I can tell, the chimney is not going to fall down anytime soon but I would rather be safe than sorry.
  5. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    No the theromix will not help your situation there is one permanent fix a tear down to below the roof line and a rebuild.
    If it as you say a little mortar in the joints is not going to get it done. There is no magic elixir that I know of that will solve it needing a rebuild
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