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Timberline Chainsaw Sharpener

Post in 'The Gear' started by george2c, Mar 1, 2013.

  1. george2c

    george2c Member

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    I came across this tool on here and read all the threads on it, but I haven't seen any recent reviews on it. Anyone out there using this and what do you think of it? I have always just used a file and a guide from stihl. I may not mind picking one up if they work good and the carbides last a good while. Man they are very expensive.. Thanks very much

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  2. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    A search will give you some info on this sharpener - I had thought about it too, but real pricey and seem slow - but a cool looking tool. If I decide to spend some cash on a sharpener, I think I'll spring for a grinder. Cheers!
  3. KodiakII

    KodiakII Feeling the Heat

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    I have a grinder that sits idle in my basement...waiting for a real unfortunate chain catastrophe. I love my Timberline and wouldn't trade it for a skid of files. Many guys are reporting that the carbides are lasting for hundreds of sharpenings...just don't turn them counter clockwise.
  4. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    I used to touch up with a file after every tank of gas. I ran four tanks thru the other day, and was still throwing good chips. That was cutting only dead, dry ash, which is usually hard on chains for me.

    Don't know why it's that good, but it is. By the time the chain needs sharpening, so do I.
  5. ArsenalDon

    ArsenalDon Minister of Fire

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    Looks too easy....way easier than my file...hmmmmmm...next toy?
  6. ArsenalDon

    ArsenalDon Minister of Fire

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    Uh...never mind my last post...just saw the price...for a fin and a quarter I can buy a lot of files and they work fine for the money
    n6crv likes this.
  7. george2c

    george2c Member

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    Thanks to all for the comments. My wife is gonna kill me again..
    MasterMech and fox9988 like this.
  8. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy Minister of Fire

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    Here is one more, just to push you over the edge for sure. The Timberline is fantastic! Sharp and accurate beyond belief! Much better than most folks can do with a file. If you aren't an artist with a film you must have one. Also enter the code "Hearth" when you order and get 10% off! Takes a bit of the sting out of the purchase.:cool:
  9. BrianK

    BrianK Guest

    The Timberline is well worth the investment, no regrets. Excellent tool, easy to use, small, portable, always makes the chain just as sharp every time and removes very little metal. Just make sure you have the carbide well seated in the cutter and you clamp the device down tight on the bar.
  10. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Probably the most fool-proof system I've seen for sharpening. Grinders are great, especially for chains with rock/nail damage, but hand filed is sharper. I'm sure the Timberline gets it just as sharp as a file too.
  11. HillbillyDlux

    HillbillyDlux New Member

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    From what I have seen I am sold, however I just received a grinder from Northern Tool at the door two weeks ago..
  12. jeff_t

    jeff_t Minister of Fire

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    I had a couple of chains that had a good amount of hand filing. I couldn't get the timberline set up to sharpen both sides equally. Must be the way I filed the opposite cutters. The chains cut straight before I tried to sharpen with the timberline, but not after. They were both so bad they bound up and bogged the saw down.

    Chains sharpened with a grinder have a different profile, too. It's best to start with a new/newish chain.
  13. Redbarn

    Redbarn Burning Hunk

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    + 1
    STICK likes this.
  14. Dyno625

    Dyno625 Member

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    Used a hand file for years, and thought it was a fine way to sharpen a chain. Was also a little turned off by the price of the Timberline. After getting one as a birthday gift and using it a couple of times I can say I have no use for a hand file any longer. I would gladly pay for one if I had to after using it. I believe that you can improve a new chain with, it works that good. And it is consistent, virtually no way to not get a perfect chain with it.
    Dakotas Dad and BrianK like this.
  15. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    A lot of people say it is a very good tool
    When U buy it U get one size carbide cutter right ? what size ?
    Lets see , I would need 3 sizes, tool, $125, 2,cutters $20 each , about $165 + shipping ,hmm
    How many chains can U sharpen before the cutter wears out ?
  16. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    It is far far more accurate than hand filing and it also means much less taken off the tooth which means longer chain life. Did I show you my chains with the tiny teeth left on them those where timberline sharpened and held out forever. The $6 dollars per chain cost vs the cost for the timberline does add up to savings over time. The best part is its retard strong it still looks like new after all the abuse I give it ! The cutters still look new as well and they really take the metal off fast clean and without effort.

    Pete
    STICK and Ralphie Boy like this.
  17. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    It looks like it would be far more accurate , and looks to be a quality tool .
    Ya , Pete , I remember the chains with the tiny teeth , that's a lot of use out of a chain :cool:
    Do they come with a 5/32 cutter or what, ? can U chose which size U want it to come with ?
  18. wh401

    wh401 New Member

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    Just ordered one on Friday after reading about it on here, can't wait to try it out. "Hearth," code was still good for $10.00 off too.
  19. george2c

    george2c Member

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    Thanks guys for all the comments, I will most likely order one soon..
  20. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Ok, U can get it with 5/32,7/32,3/16, or 13/64
    Carbides will last a minimum of 30+ Sharpenings
  21. Dyno625

    Dyno625 Member

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    It says carbide's last for 30 plus chains, not sharpenings. I think they mean for the life of 30 chains. That is a lot of sharpenings.
  22. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    I am way past 30 sharpenings !

    Pete
  23. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    Looks like one heck of a nice tool. I just got the Northern Tool grinder a month or so ago, but am thinking about getting this Timberline one too now. How do you adjust the rakers with this Timberline tool, or do you just use the raker guide and a file to adjust the rakers after sharpening the chain with the Timberline tool. The Timberline tool just looks so much more simplistic than a grinder that it isn't even funny. I played around with my grinder the other day and it seemed like a pain to get all the angles lined up, etc. Granted, I have no idea if the stone in the grinder was the correct one, which might have been the cause of the problems.

    The Timberline also seems like it would take a lot less metal off the cutter than a grinder, and there is no worry about excess heat on a cutter from the grinder. Would be something nice to have in the chainsaw box too for on the site sharpening when you are having a really bad day.
  24. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    For the saws you have Fabs, should be a 3/16" wheel on the grinder. 1/4" or 5/16" for the rakers.

    Going back and forth between grinder and file/Timberline will eat up chain quicker than sticking to one method. There is a slightly different profile left behind by each method. The grinder often will also take a bit more off of a new chain but once the first sharpening is done, you just barely touch each tooth to restore the edge.
  25. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    This (Carbides will last a minimum of 30+ Sharpenings) I did not type in ,I copied and pasted it from their web site

    Paste
    ProductHighlights
    Tungsten Carbide Cutters are designed specifically for the Timberline Chainsaw Sharpener. 4 diameter sizes are used to properly fit different sizes of chain.
    7/32″ is used for 3/8″ pitch chain as well as .404″ pitch chain
    13/64″is also used for 3/8″ pitch, but is slightly smaller and recommended on Stihl chain.
    3/16″ is used for .325″ pitch chain
    5/32″ is used for 3/8″ small Low Profile chain
    7/32″ = 5.5 mm
    13/64″ = 5.0 mm
    3/16″ = 4.8 mm
    5/32″ = 4.0 mm

    Ask any machinist and they will tell you tungsten carbide is extremely tough and durable and will outlast any hardened steel file period. Because of its durability it is difficult to claim an exact lifespan. However, much testing and customer feedback allows us to confidently claim a minimum of 30+ sharpenings. Users may very well exceed 100+ sharpenings with careful use by not binding the carbide cutter and always spinning clockwise.
    It is recommended to sharpen the chain often instead of waiting until it is extremely dull. This will make sharpening even faster with a quick touch up while reducing wear on both the carbide cutter and the chain itself.
    STICK likes this.

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