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Took the plunge!!

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by dyerkutn, Apr 1, 2013.

  1. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    De Boomdokter seems to think so.==c


    I got a Fiskars because I needed an axe, and they're all the rage here on hearth.com, with a dissenting opinion from Dennis and a few others. It has a non-stick coating that supposedly reduces effort. I haven't used enough axes to have a strong opinion on it, but for $35, I'm happy. :)
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/fiskars-splitting-axe-maul.102859/

    Processing firewood is definitely back-breaking work. I wasn't suggesting that you split lots of wood, but measuring the moisture on the outer surface instead of splitting it open would not give you useful data.

    If you're not going to split it before measuring, then I suggest the marimba method. Tap on it with a hammer, if it "plinks" like a bowling pin or marimba note, it's good to go, IME. If it gives more of a dull thud, there's too much water in it.

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  2. dyerkutn

    dyerkutn Feeling the Heat

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    Ha Ha
    --I was thinking that if I saw a good deal for split wood I would take my MM along to check it out. Or maybe if I get some delivered to see how long it will need to be "seasoned" more

    I am going to try this right now on the wood that I didn't use because it was too long for my stove (but will fit in my new stove when it gets installed)
  3. dyerkutn

    dyerkutn Feeling the Heat

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    OK thanks
  4. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    http://southcoast.craigslist.org/zip/3732251563.html
    If this is near you and still available this is fantastic!

    Ray
  5. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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  6. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    Just to clarify. . .it doesn't matter if the wood has already been split. It needs to be split at the time of the moisture reading. Wood dries on the outside relatively quickly, and only a reading on a fresh split will tell you what the condition of the wood is on the inside, so take your MM and your axe. Whatever piece of wood you want to measure, split it open and measure on the inside. ;)
  7. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    If one has the space it is worth the trip Den ;) I don't know how much space the OP has there so it may work for them or someone else here.. I'd be all over that if it wasn't 1.5 hrs. away from me..

    Ray
  8. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    I agree. Anything cut short enough to fit in the stove and already split is certainly worth a local trip.:)
    Just pointing out the oak issue. You know, don't expect to burn it before ~ 2015.<>
    raybonz likes this.
  9. dyerkutn

    dyerkutn Feeling the Heat

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    Yes that is now very clear. Thanks
  10. dyerkutn

    dyerkutn Feeling the Heat

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    I have plenty of space in my back yard--just no structures to store it with and my land is a little slopey--rock shelf underneath. I just got a set of 4 foot high metal wood rack ends and 2 8 foot 2 by 4's so that is one eight foot storage area and I have another one of my porch that can be moved. So this is going to be a process of building bit by bit!
  11. dyerkutn

    dyerkutn Feeling the Heat

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  12. dyerkutn

    dyerkutn Feeling the Heat

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    This is a whole new level of dryness and being scientific about it than I am used to. As I have mentioned before, I have been burning in my little CDW for about 10 years and I thought I had gotten to know pretty well what is more dry and what is not. One year I had wood that sizzled. But otherwise I thought my wood was very dry and it burned great and hot. But from this forum I can see that you experts would probably have told me that the wood is not seasoned enough. THat old stove is so dirty that if there was a lot of creosote I don't think I would have noticed and the stove pipe didn't generally get clogged (except once) and I have been very thrilled to have a source of heat outside of oil--an option I fell into when I bought the house.

    However, with the brand new T5 coming (hopefully next week) I want to heed the advice from all of you who have given it, but without any chance in the foreseeable future of owning a truck or having the capacity to split. I am optimistic that this is possible, though maybe not as cheaply as it would be if I could do it myself.
    raybonz likes this.
  13. dyerkutn

    dyerkutn Feeling the Heat

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    We'll see!
    Checked this out at a local place--looks like an interesting alternative for me. Does it create flames? Does it work any differently than wood as far as the secondary burn? Any other down sides?
  14. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    If you're getting plenty of heat, and your chimney stays clean, your wood is "good enough," scientifically speaking.;lol

    Most of the folks here who process their own wood do so because they enjoy it. We have a running joke about "saving money" with wood heat. . .
    Stove $2k
    Truck $10k
    Trailer $1k
    ATV $10K
    Splitter$1k
    Chainsaw $500
    Chainsaw #2 $500
    Gas, Oil, Maintenance for AOTA $
    Chainsaw Chaps $100
    Axe, Peavey, etc. $100
    Heating with wood. . .priceless. ;lol

    That said;lol, even if you have your wood split & delivered, sometimes you need to re-split some pieces. . .to get them to fit into the stove, to dry more quickly, to measure moisture, or for kindling.
    You might want to look for something like this:

    http://www.amazon.com/Pow-Kraft-655...p_1091946_1_14?ie=UTF8&qid=1365873463&sr=1-14

    http://www.lowes.com/pd_241483-5339...rentURL=?Ns=p_product_avg_rating|1&facetInfo=
  15. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    Burns like wood, only better!;lol
    Guaranteed low moisture, 'cause it's made from sawdust, and before it became dust, it was probably kiln-dried lumber.


    Downsides:
    You can't leave them in big piles out in the yard like firewood. If wood bricks get wet, they turn back into sawdust. OTOH, you can store them in your house without worrying about bugs.

    You would be deprived of the gourmet aspect of wood burning.
    "Hmm. . .what shall we have this evening? Hickory. . .with a bit of cherry for flavor?"

    I saw some complaints this season about varying quality in different batches (different mfr's?) of bricks from Tractor Supply Co.

    Kinda pricey, but if you're looking at kiln-dried wood, you're probably in the same ballpark.

    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/biobrick-vs-real-wood-whats-the-deal.81581/

    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/biobrick-experiences.58214/

    http://hearth.com/econtent/index.php/wiki/BioBricks/
  16. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    A shelter is a luxury item. Pallets are free just place them end to end and top cover only and you'll be fine..

    Ray
  17. dyerkutn

    dyerkutn Feeling the Heat

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    Always good to hear I might be doing something OK;lol

    Humor greatly appreciated--puts things in perspective
    ditto on humor

    Read the threads--very helpful. Thanks
  18. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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