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Tools for Saw work! Husky' or saws in general.

Post in 'The Gear' started by Sean McGillicuddy, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. Sean McGillicuddy

    Sean McGillicuddy Burning Hunk

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    What type of tools are needed?
    What compression tool?
    What clutch tool?
    Were can you find a 6" t-25 bit for drills?
    Every one can participate!
    Is there a list some were?
    Should there be one in the stickies?
    Thanks
    Sean
    Jon1270 likes this.

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  2. computeruser

    computeruser Feeling the Heat

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    Buy this Wiha tool kit for starters: http://www.baileysonline.com/itemdetail.asp?item=WTK&CAT=

    [​IMG]

    If you can find a T27 bit for a drill (Stihl is T27, not T25), do let us know. But the t-handle one in the Wiha kit seems to work really well, even if a drill-mounted one might be a touch faster. From there, a pressure/vac tester wouldn't be a bad idea. A tachometer and compression tester could be added in, too. If you end up needing a clutch tool, you can probably make one out of a junk socket for most saws with external clutches.
    TreePointer likes this.
  3. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    When I put a new top end on my Makita 6401, I got that Baileys Wiha set mentioned above and the piston ring clamp set, too. Worked great.

    Piston Ring Clamp Set

    Compression tester for chainsaws needs to have a Schrader valve. Also at Baileys.

    There are home methods to test spark, but a cheap spark tester is nice to have.

    Tachometer: I've been using the DTI Fast-Tach lately. A nice model.
  4. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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  5. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    Locking clamps (aka hemostat) for pulling fuel lines and other hoses through tight areas.
  6. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    Picks for pulling small or thin parts (gaskets etc.)

    Telescoping magnet for getting that screw/bolt out of the crankcase. D'oh!
  7. Boog

    Boog Minister of Fire

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    I have found a "Piston Stop - Clutch Removal tool" to be particulary useful for removing clutches to clean them, and the oil pump area behind them. I also get by with just one nice T27 "Tee handle" tool (and a 4mm allen one for 031AVs). A pair of curved tweezers (or fine needlenose) also helps. Everything else is just standard stuff off my workbench.


    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Piston-Stop...150?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1c2f2ecb56
  8. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    How serious do you wanna get? ;) ;lol

    I have a small cordless screwdriver that accepts 1/4" hex bits. The small impacting ones are even better.

    Mine is a Snap-On CTS561 (it's a few years old now, still a champ). Really saves a lot of time with housings that are held together with a ton of screws. Your hands thank you at the end of the day.

    I have Snap-On T27 bits, in 3" and 6" lengths, with 1/4" hex drive. They last a lot longer than cheapies and strip far fewer screws. I also hit screw heads that are filthy with a shot of compressed air to clear the drive before I try to remove it. Stihl also sells extended length driver bits in T27. Many dealers carry them for their techs. They are good quality but don't have a lifetime warranty. ;)
    Pressure/Vac testers, the adapter and block off bplates to go with them are a must for anything beyond casual DIY work. As are a good tach, (mine is a Stihl EDT-7), and compression tester (mine is the Craftsman/Mity-Vac kit).

    Adjustable gap spark tester. The neon light kind (which I like for other types of work) will give a positive result even if the plug isn't firing under compression.

    Air compressor for clean-up and running small air tools. Cleaning a saw without one gets old real fast. Plus you will use it around the house and on other jobs as well. Doesn't have to be big and bad either. Small units with a pancake or hot dog type tank work fine for inflating tires, moderate blow-gun usage, and quick bursts from an impact gun. I have a 26 gallon Craftsman professional compressor that is a bit small for my needs but does 80% of what I need with ease. Doesn't like my air drill or die grinder for more than a minute or two however. ;)

    Clutch removal on most saws is best accomplished with a 3/8" impact and deep socket. Most air compressors will run a 3/8" impact for the 5 sec burst it takes to bang off a stubborn clutch. There are great cordless electric units out there too. If you get saws that require special sockets/wrenches to remove them, aquire the tools. They pay for themselves quickly, even if you're only working on your own equipment. Piston stops are recommended but not absolutely necessary. Rope works well and I often use compressed air in the cyl.

    Small 1/4" drive torque wrench for sure. Cylinder hold down bolts should be torqued. This is an absolute must if you work on other peoples' saws.

    Get a crank seal puller tool. Unless you only work on your saws and are willing to chance screw-ups. Messing up 1 saw performing what is a very simple task with the right tool, will cost you much more than you'll pay for the tool.

    Parts washer big enough to dunk an entire saw crankcase in (10-12 gallon minimum, mine is a 20). Sooner or later you will get a saw that can't even see what brand or model it is until it gets a bath.

    If you play with big, expensive saws, (60cc on up) then you might think about tools to split cases. This cannot be done properly without special tools that you either fabricate (a proper clutch-side splitter isn't hard to build if you're handy with a welder.) or buy. They will be $$ so don't worry about getting them right away unless you have a big job to do right off.


    THE MOST IMPORTANT ASPECT OF CHAINSAW REPAIR

    Make yourself a sharpening expert. Saws that leave your shop running well, with properly dressed bars and expertly sharpened chains, will do a helluva lotta advertising for you, the good kind. ;) Units that come in for simple tune-ups and adjustments can leave feeling like a whole-new machine.
  9. Sean McGillicuddy

    Sean McGillicuddy Burning Hunk

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    Man Will have to play lottery.
    Great info , will need to get a compression tester.
    Just cause the first question you guys ask is what is the compression!!!!!!!!!!!
  10. Halligan

    Halligan Feeling the Heat

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    I probably have invested a minimum of $10,000 in hand tools over the past 20 years but still could not properly disassemble my saws if needed. So a month ago I went to Bailey's and ordered the Wiha tool kit, clutch tools for both my 346XP and 372XP and a compression tester. Up next wil be a tachometer and piston ring clamp set. I even went so far as to purchase a toolbox which I dedicated to chainsaw tools and parts so I know everything is in one place when it's "saw time".
  11. Sean McGillicuddy

    Sean McGillicuddy Burning Hunk

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    He who dies with the most tools win!!!!!!!!!!!!
  12. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Saves a lot of time & frustration. Lots of saws/trimmers/blowers come in with "carb problems" and wind up being shy in the compression readings. You can fart around with that carb all day, replace it, and the engine still runs like crap. Compression test is easy, inexpensive, and tells you in about 5 minutes if you're wasting your time or not.
  13. Sean McGillicuddy

    Sean McGillicuddy Burning Hunk

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    So were to get a decent priced Compression tester?
    Check local Sears not impressed To much $.
    Will try an Auto Zone.
    Sean
  14. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    This is the same set I own, I paid about $50 for it 10 years ago.

    http://www.tooltopia.com/mityvac-mv5530.aspx

    ^^ A really nice site for tool junkies like me. ==c Order $100+ and it ships free. :cool:
    [​IMG]
  15. Sean McGillicuddy

    Sean McGillicuddy Burning Hunk

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    Special order around $70 @ Auto Zone.
  16. Advance auto has an OTC kit for 70. But you can get 25 off of 70 with coupon code a124. Or 15 off 100 and a 50 store credit with code ja21.
    MasterMech likes this.
  17. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

  18. Sean McGillicuddy

    Sean McGillicuddy Burning Hunk

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    Hard to sneak them into the tool box that way.::P
  19. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    Mine complains about tool purchases and I look at her and ask "You did marry a mechanic, right?". :p
  20. Mischa Shashumshkavich

    Mischa Shashumshkavich Member

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    .....well, i just read this older post(at work) and did a stock check, i found some APEX T27 bits in our ''non-stock'' items....about 1" long.....would work nice in a magnetic bit holder.....bit holder may not fit into tight spots tho
  21. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    You're right about the tight spots. For removing covers and similar parts, any torx bit or driver should get the job done; however, the longer bits (like 6") are needed to go through the length of the cylinder to reach cylinder bolts.
  22. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    Here's what you want. I bought a pack of the same ones last year, kept a couple and resold the others. They're good quality and cheap.
  23. Mischa Shashumshkavich

    Mischa Shashumshkavich Member

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    thanks....im'a take a looksie for some 6" T27's.....if i can't find any, i'll check your link....
  24. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    Sure. I've also been wanting to pick up a similarly long 4mm Allen bit for working on Husqvarna saws. The only source I've found sells them 10 at a time, so if I do get them I'll have extras again, in case anyone is interested.
  25. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    I love T-handles for removing tough fasteners, but I've actually broken a cylinder bolt with one while installing a cylinder. That's why I use a torque wrench with a long torx bit on cylinder bolts, as I mentioned earlier:

    I haven't used those Irwin torx bits, so I can't attest to their quality and fit. I have been pleased with the Wiha bits I've used.

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