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Two Degrees...

Post in 'The Green Room' started by agartner, Dec 21, 2010.

  1. agartner

    agartner Feeling the Heat

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    Loc:
    Southern NH
    ...and I couldn't be happier. Back in November I ordered some vinyl replacement windows to replace my house's 1970's single pane original equipment windows and storms. My main level digital thermostat is set for 68 degrees during the waking hours, and that's pretty much where the room stays. My woodstove historically has taken the lions share of keeping that temperature, but I could very seldom get that temp to rise above it.

    Well, the windows on the upper levels of the home have been all replaced today - the lower level where the stove is gets done tomorrow, and I"m reading 70 degrees and holding - exactly 2 degrees warmer than I've ever seen it. Me is very, very happy, and I totally not regret taking the money I spent on those windows and spending it on one of those fancy soapstone stoves. I've got you all to thank for posting that often seen advice in these forums - insulate, insulate, insulate!

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  2. cmonSTART

    cmonSTART Minister of Fire

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    Antrim, NH
    Excellent! We need to do the same in our place. The windows are old and the insulation could be better.
  3. Lighting Up

    Lighting Up Feeling the Heat

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    Loc:
    Roc City NY
    You will be very happy with the your new windows. Good e -double pane glass windows...wait till the sun comes out you will feel it like no other. Have a merry!
    md
  4. fishingpol

    fishingpol Minister of Fire

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    Merrimack Valley, MA
    I just put a new back door in my house Saturday. The mudroom stays nice and warm now. Should have done it years ago. Found plenty of gaps that received a good dose of expansion foam and caulking. Taking advantage of the energy rebate before the year is up. I have an older house so there was no insulation or caulking around the old door. There were plenty of spaces for air to enter. Sorry for the thread hijack.
  5. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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    Its a good feeling isn't it to see the fruit of an investment that is only just starting a long payback period.

    Actually, I'd say "seal, seal, seal" not "insulate, insulate, insulate". I contend that its almost useless to insulate until you address infiltration and I suspect that may be what you've really accomplished with your new windows. Your new windows' insulation (R or U depending on how you look at it) values may have increased a bit but windows are, in general, relatively bad insulation when compared to walls. I'd bet your new windows seal a lot better than the old ones though and that's probably what's making the biggest difference. I could be wrong though, and if that's the case, more power to you and your windows. Whatever works works.

    My wife's kindergarten classroom is a great example the power of sealing. Some contractors have been doing some energy upgrades on the '70s vintage building such as installing insulation and replacing light fixtures, probably part of Obama's "Cash for Caulker's" initiative or something similar. They've been doing different upgrades every weekend some of which included insulation installation. Last weekend they installed weatherstripping around all the doors and the change in the feel of the place was immediate and dramatic. Everyone that works there or visits mentions it.
  6. midwestcoast

    midwestcoast Minister of Fire

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    NW Indiana
    [quote author="Semipro" date="1292918194]
    Its a good feeling isn't it to see the fruit of an investment that is only just starting a long payback period.

    Actually, I'd say "seal, seal, seal" not "insulate, insulate, insulate". I contend that its almost useless to insulate until you address infiltration and I suspect that may be what you've really accomplished with your new windows. Your new windows' insulation (R or U depending on how you look at it) values may have increased a bit but windows are, in general, relatively bad insulation when compared to walls. I'd bet your new windows seal a lot better than the old ones though and that's probably what's making the biggest difference. I could be wrong though, and if that's the case, more power to you and your windows. Whatever works works.

    My wife's kindergarten classroom is a great example the power of sealing. Some contractors have been doing some energy upgrades on the '70s vintage building such as installing insulation and replacing light fixtures, probably part of Obama's "Cash for Caulker's" initiative or something similar. They've been doing different upgrades every weekend some of which included insulation installation. Last weekend they installed weatherstripping around all the doors and the change in the feel of the place was immediate and dramatic. Everyone that works there or visits mentions it.[/quote]

    +1 air sealing first & foremost then insulation. Low e-dual panes average R-3 while single-panes with storms around R-2. Can be a huge difference in air infiltration though.

    The Homestar Bill, aka "Cash for Caulkers" hasn't passed congress
  7. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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    Coincidentally I received a link to this article this morning. Its a great real-life example of what we're talking about.

    http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/blogs/dept/energy-solutions/comfort-and-drafts

    Tagline for the article:
    "Good Insulation Isn't Always Enough to Keep Your House Warm: Alex Wilson enlists the Draft Detective to find and stop the biggest culprits in uncomfortable old homes: air leaks. Learn how to find out if your home could be more comfortable and economical than it is."
  8. agartner

    agartner Feeling the Heat

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    Southern NH
    "seal seal seal". Yes that would be totally more accurate. I've got one of those IR guns and I've been on the hunt for weeks...lol.

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