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Vogelzang The Colonial

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Corriewf, Dec 3, 2009.

  1. Corriewf

    Corriewf New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2009
    Messages:
    290
    Loc:
    Central VA
    Well, I noticed that gap on mine as well. Not sure if it will make a difference or not if it does get sealed. This is my first year using a wood stove and I am pretty sure in a few months when im done for this year, I am going to discover a few things I will want to fix. I am glad you reminded me of that crack. I also think that where my liner goes into the stove could use some sealing. One thing I wonder is if it is ok to seal that gap or will it shift too much as it expanded with heat etc. Another concern of mine since I have never used cement is if it is easy to remove. If I use it to seal the gap with my SS liner and then later get a different stove, can I simply hit it with a hammer or something?

    Went to Lowes today out of curiosity to see if they had the cement. I know ACE around the corner has stuff for pointing up a fireplace mortar... Same stuff?

    Good luck with the stove and please let me know how it goes. FYI, buy some longer screws at home depot to attach the blower. I have my blower about 2 inches off the wood stove for better circ. It's a nice 73 degrees in here tonight with 69 upstairs. :)

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  2. sbowers22

    sbowers22 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2009
    Messages:
    24
    Loc:
    North Texas
    I have been getting temps ranging from 350-550 degees. I have wood in al kinds of condition and have really noticed the difference in temp depending on wood quality and condition. Except for the small fire box this stove has surpassed all my expectation. We hardly use our furnace at all anymore, usually just a few minutes in the morning and maybe a when we get home from work. We were without power for 3 days last week and it kept most of our 2300 sq. ft. house at 65+ degrees with outside temps in the 20's and 30's and that was without the fan blowing since we had no power. Next year I plan on having good cured split wood to burn. I have only been using it since the first of the year but by using all the information from this website it just keeps getting better. The best info on here is that "It's all about the wood".
  3. Corriewf

    Corriewf New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2009
    Messages:
    290
    Loc:
    Central VA
    What is your technique if you dont mind me asking. I have one which I posted on this thread that seems to work good, but I like to experiment. Seems when I leave the air open, instead of getting a hot burn, I get a shorter burn that isn't really hot at all.
  4. jockum

    jockum New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2011
    Messages:
    12
    Loc:
    michigan
    NEWBIE HERE needs advice: First of all, I think this is a great forum for woodburners, and I found a lot of good tips regarding the Colonial. I am a veteran wood burner with wood stoves, and my dinosaur 23 year old masonry fireplace, but not with an insert. I pulled the trigger on the Colonial, and installed yesterday. The problem I am having is with backdraft when reloading.My house does have a make up air installed to my ductwork, and leaving a door open while reloading does not seem to make a difference. My chimney had a 12"x12" flue. I had to remove the damper and cut part od the damper frame out to install the liner, which was the Simpson stainless steel 6". No problem there, as the tiles were all nice and straight and in good condition. I then installed the top plate to cover the flue and siliconed it to the tile. The cap was installed above it.I used a 15' length of liner and cot 2' off, leaving me with 13' total. My thought is that I may have to install insulation around the liner so it heats up better, increasing the draft. Outside of this, and the blower issue, it seems to be burning well and doing a good job heating my 2000 ft. home. Again, thank you all for contributing on this site, any any advice would be appreciated!
  5. Skyco

    Skyco New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    SC/NC
    Ooops...the Colonial manual says-

    "2. Chimney Size. Minimum chimney size is 6Ë (152mm) diameter. Maintain a 15 ft. minimum overall chimney height measured from the top of appliance to the top of the chimney. Chimneys must extend at least 3 ft. above the roof and at least 2 ft. above the highest point within 10 ft. of the chimney top. See the Chimney Connections section of this manual."

    I'd extend it and insulate it.
  6. jockum

    jockum New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2011
    Messages:
    12
    Loc:
    michigan
    I did install a 6" liner, through the masonry chimney, which is 5' higher at the top than the nearest point 10' away.My house is a ranch, and the existing fireplace has a brick hearth 18" up from the floor. That is why I only have the 13'.The funny thing is, it barely backdrafts now after the first day of using it. I may have to insulate the liner though. Thanx for your input.
  7. Fake coal burner

    Fake coal burner Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2008
    Messages:
    229
    Loc:
    Salt Lake City Utah
    Try putting a small box fan on the floor at the far end of the house blowing cold air towards the stove. Try on low speed. should even out the heat for you do you has a block of plate istalled with insolation?
  8. EddyCA

    EddyCA New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2014
    Messages:
    1
    Loc:
    Concord, CA
    Colonial review after 4 winters:

    I have use the Vogelzang Colonial for four relatively mild California winters and I joined the forum to leave a review.

    The unit is constructed in China but seems well constructed. It carries an EPA (level 1) certification and does not have a catalytic converter. If I recall correctly, the efficiency is 76% which is not as high as some units but is quite good for this price range. We have a small home, only 1200 sq ft, and the fireplace is our sole source of heat during the daytime (I actually removed and discarded our natural gas burning furnace at the same time as I installed the insert. We use electric mattress heaters and portable space heaters in the bedrooms during the night).

    The unit produces sufficient heat to warm our home. The firebox holds a decent amount of wood but is smaller than many. It holds enough wood, if well packed, to heat the house for a full day (if using hardwood) when it's not too cold. On the colder days, I usually let the first fire completely burn out and build a smaller second fire (generally just softwood) in the evening. If I add wood before the first fire goes out, we generate too much heat. Indeed, producing too much heat is usually our problem, but I've learned to judge how much wood I need after a few winters. Of course, we're in coastal California and I've insulated my house well and swapped in modern dual-pane windows. But I would expect this unit to be adequate for a small home even in the coldest reaches of the north.

    The unit is attractive and the glass door is a good size. Overall, the size is small but it is a good looking unit, except for the panels which surround the unit, they're plain and a bit cheap and rickety -- need to tighten bolts annually.

    I do not like the included blower. It is quite loud, rattles at startup and at lower speeds, but produces a good airflow. It's about as loud as our wall AC unit when on high. But at lower speeds, it rattles annoyingly such that it cannot be used at those speeds. I do not think it's the same quality as the insert itself and I am now looking to replace it. Fortunately they are cheap. I haven't found a replacement yet. Indeed, it was my search which lead me to this website.

    In short: box great, panels acceptable, blower unacceptable, price great.

    Since the unit was so cheap, I don't mind replacing the blower.

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