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What about new growth after cutting?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Backwoods Savage, May 20, 2013.

  1. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    We've seen a few posts by folks wondering what happens after trees get cut and how long before the trees start growing again. This is just one example but it does show that trees can make a comeback rather quickly.


    Many will remember that we cut off a lot of our pines back in December 2011. We sort of wanted to clean up because there is lots of slash all over but then we considered if we clean it up and don't get new pines or something growing quickly the we would have the old problem of blowing sand. So we've done very little cleaning up.

    The first picture is actually a pile of slash that ranges from 4-7 or 8 feet tall. We did not want to burn it because of a couple trees that are still close. You can't see it much in the picture unless you click on it to get regular size but then you can see we have several cherry and maple trees already growing out of it.

    The second and third pictures show lots of new cherry and some maples. The tree you can see in the second picture is a cherry and there is a smaller maple close to it on the other side.

    So right now we are quite pleased as we've found cherry, maple, oak, pine and popple growing. Future firewood.


    New growth on slash 2013.JPG New growth-sand-1.JPG


    New growth-sand-2.JPG
    Thistle, ScotO and zap like this.

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  2. jdp1152

    jdp1152 Minister of Fire

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    Clear cut about a 1/5th of an acre last year. I've already got 50-60 4-5inch maples sprouting up. Thinking about moving them to pots for a later date. Already transplanted the eastern hemlocks last spring.
  3. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Ya, that is nice to see that new growth so soon. Is there a reason you want to move them rather than letting them grow where they are?
  4. jdp1152

    jdp1152 Minister of Fire

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    I cleared the area so I could make a level yard for my 4yr old to play in. I moved the Hemlocks to the front to create a privacy hedge. Not sure what I'll do with the maples since the canopy isn't really favorable for new growth. Maybe my brother would want them. Either way, if I move them to to pots I've got plenty of time to figure that out and can have a little fun teaching my kid to take care of them.
    ScotO likes this.
  5. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    That should work out well then.
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  6. jdp1152

    jdp1152 Minister of Fire

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    Here a few shots I just took. There is one hemlock still back there waiting to be transplanted, but it's a bit late and I've got new grass growing so perhaps in June when I get back from Europe and the grass is better established. Easy enough to get a single tree some extra TLC in the warmer months to get it through (also going in a pretty shady area). The rest are maple and two red oaks growing between the ash roots (amazing that ash is sprouting after not having a bit of green on it standing for two years)

    The last picture is where I already transplanted the hemlocks to the front. Not sure why they look so huge....range from 1-3 ft.

    Attached Files:

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  7. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    I'm always potting & moving small birch & spruce.
    Tree management along the property lines :).
  8. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    Me too, with the lawn mower or chainsaw though. :)

  9. paul bunion

    paul bunion Minister of Fire

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    Yes that vegetation comes back real quick. I bet you will have a good succession of animals in there too. If you are into birding you will probably see some different birds on the saplings and then I'd imagine you will have some grouse thriving as it gets a bit thicker and taller. The deer or moose should be in to browse also, but some slash can act a natural fence to keep them from eating everything. Last fall we made three patch cuts on our land totaling 10 acres. I'm pretty excited to watch it grow back over the rest of my life. Almost all of it left as pulp, as result of it being high graded 50 years ago by the logger who used to own the land and then by us 15 years ago when we weren't any wiser. Hopefully this time some quality saw logs can be grown there and the wildlife can benefit also.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  10. pyroholic

    pyroholic Member

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    What's high graded?
  11. paul bunion

    paul bunion Minister of Fire

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    When you cut the valuable timber and leave the crap. 30 years later the worthless trees are still worthless, just bigger. Do it again and it gets worse. You have nothing but pulp or firewood, which only nets you about $30 per truckload.
  12. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Indeed we have lots of birds and animals. No moose though. Lots of deer and we really enjoy them. We sort of helped them through this winter because last fall we had no acorns nor apples. We have lots of wild apple trees and the deer love them in the fall but with no fruit and no acorns, they went into winter a bit lean. We had 14-15 visit us daily. We laughed many times though because if they weren't here, before I'd go in the house in the late afternoon, I'd call them. Sort of like calling cows. They would come on the run! As soon as things greened up, we don't see them as often. Also having the turkey hunters out got the deer a bit on edge.

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