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What are YOUR usual temps? taking a poll

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by jimmieguns, Jan 2, 2013.

  1. neumsky

    neumsky Minister of Fire

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    Huh?

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  2. WhitePine

    WhitePine Feeling the Heat

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    He has three stoves. And he is being a smart azz. ;)
  3. neumsky

    neumsky Minister of Fire

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    Ok...you got me lol
  4. Bub381

    Bub381 Minister of Fire

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    450 to 550,all we use are floor fans.Had it to 600 once.About 350 shoulder season.The double wall pipe is usually 150 but i have had it to 350 after a reload when i forgot to close it up soon enough.I close the bypass before the air and it drops like a rock.
  5. Trilifter7

    Trilifter7 Feeling the Heat

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    400-450 during long burns. 500-600 when I want to bring the temp up quick. Flu temp almost always stays between 180-220
  6. MnDave

    MnDave Guest

    I am using a Quadra Fire 5700 using a 160 CFM fan on max with just-ok wood. Stove top measured with IR handheld is 350-400F. With my best wood it runs 450-500 even though I have the air control set at minimum and the damper fully closed. Could be that extreme cold (-10F) created a super strong draft.

    I get an 8-10 hr burn out of a 3 cf load. It heats an 1800 sf house when it is 0F outside. Average overnight temp is 68F. Ranges between 66 and 70. My hope is that with harder and dryer wood, the house will be even warmer and the burn time will get to 10 minimum.

    MnDave
    neumsky likes this.
  7. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    Hottest part of the top plate that I can find will generally read between 550-700, depending on the load. My air settings are basically always within a 1/4 of an inch of a certain spot on the handle. The temp will vary depending on how much fuel I put in, how I loaded the wood in, and how hot the coals were I loaded on.

    pen
    neumsky likes this.
  8. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    Got into a conversation with my wife when she came home from work just after I put a full load into the 30. Forgot about the 30. Came running into the room to the stove top at 790.

    Closed the air down quickly in short stages, got the fan going and the stove top didn't get any hotter. It was mighty warm in that room for a while...
  9. River19

    River19 Member

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    Normally 400-450 however when I need to really heat up a cold cabin I will run it at 500-600 for a bit then crank it downt o the normal range.
  10. etiger2007

    etiger2007 Minister of Fire

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    I always run my fan on high, so lastnight I wanted to try something different so I loaded the stove and put the fan on the lowest setting. The stove crept up to 625 as measured on the stove top and was radiating heat like never before so I decided to leave it and went to bed. ( I loaded 2 ash splits with one small black locust split on that, this was at 9pm house was around 72 degrees) I got up for work at 4am (19 outside temp) the house was at 71 and the stove top was at 275ish and I still had one ash split that had the shape of the split but fell apart once I hit it with the poker, I also had not one bit of charcoal it was all fluffy ash. The fire box was cleaner than ever before, sure my bricks always look like new but even in the corners of the bricks were clean and the ends of the secondary tubes were crystal clean. So I loaded the stove again and left the fan on low and went to work. Im thinking for whatever reason that running my stove with the blower on high was killing the effiecency of the stove and the burn. I will keep doing this and see how it goes.
  11. ailanthus

    ailanthus Feeling the Heat

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    That happens occasionally to most of us who run one stove - let alone 3!
  12. TradEddie

    TradEddie Minister of Fire

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    400-500 unless I need it hotter, which is rare. Blower thermostatically activates after about 10 minutes above 400, usually kept on lowest speed. Blower gets switched off if room goes over 80F, but I honestly don't see a big difference either way.

    TE
  13. etiger2007

    etiger2007 Minister of Fire

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    Just called the wife and got the low down on how the 4am load is going (almost 5 hrs later), 400 stove top and a 72 degree house fan on low, 80 in the stove room.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  14. neumsky

    neumsky Minister of Fire

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    I would suggest not doing it in stages...but shut that air down...right away. I've done that...and it takes longer for it to take effect. I love my damper for that reason!
  15. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    The problem with closing it down completely, that fast, with that much going on in the firebox, is that you risk a woofing of some sort. Where everything builds up in the stove and kind of freaks out.

    The short, controlled shutdown worked while having no negative results.
    pen likes this.
  16. neumsky

    neumsky Minister of Fire

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    What's woofing? You mean administering air back into it? I've never heard of that...and it's the only way...I've been able to get my temps stabalized and on the way down. I've tried the slow way...and the temps will continue on the rise!
  17. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    Yep, and someday it just might "woof" at you as the gasses that built up which couldn't be ignited take off all at once and blow the door open, ash pan open, pipe out of the top of the stove, seam open on a pipe, etc.

    Make sure you have 3 screws in EVERY joint, and attached so that it can't come out of the thimble if going into a masonry chimney for that day you experience what BBar is talking about for yourself.

    pen
  18. neumsky

    neumsky Minister of Fire

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    This is what we call burping on the big green egg! And even tho...it's only because of administering air back into it to soon.
  19. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    That's the problem, there is a bunch of air entering that stove that the operator can't control with an epa unit. When woofing would happen on my fisher if I turned it down too far on a hot coal bed, there would be flames that would shoot right out the draft caps !!!
  20. neumsky

    neumsky Minister of Fire

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    So the best way would be to get the fastest way to cool down would be to close it down with both the inlet air and damper...than crack both??? To keep the woof away??? haha
  21. MaintenanceMan

    MaintenanceMan Burning Hunk

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    Cruise around 450-550 stovetop. Blower on low constantly until she comes back down to 350.
  22. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Lol....me too! I have a Fluke IR thermometer, but really don't use it to monitor the stove. It'd be kinda hard for me to get a combined stovetop total anyway, can't get that reading off of the NZ3000.........it's stovetop is hidden by the decorative shroud.

    I know its enough to keep us toasty and warm even in the coldest temps!
  23. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    Just don't let the fire rage out of control, then slam the air shut. Only way to keep the woof's at bay is to close the air down in stages as the stove is warming up. If I find that I'm an hour into a burn, the air has been closed down for 30 mins and the temp is still climbing, then I start closing down the pipe damper.

    Once that firebox is hot, the wood will be out gassing. Normally it has enough oxygen to burn. However, if it's hot enough to out gas, and there isn't sufficient oxygen for it to burn, the flammable gasses will build up in the stove. The "woof" will happen when it just so happen to get enough air or just right right spark.

    If I made a mistake, and didn't turn the air down quick enough during the initial start-up, an option is to close the pipe damper, and close the air down most of the way, but make sure you still have flames. Never close things down so much that the fire stops as that's a recipe for it to "woof"

    Another option with dealing with an initial start that has gotten out of control is to open the door right up (you must stay in attendance of course) for a min or a few. This stops secondary action, sends a ton of air up the chimney, and basically turns your stove into an inefficient open fireplace where the extra movement of air will cool things down. Once things are controlled, then I close the door, close the pipe damper, and turn the air down as far as it takes to keep things controlled but not out.

    pen
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  24. neumsky

    neumsky Minister of Fire

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    This is much appreciated...and well excepted. I think you hit the nail on the head...keep a flame going. I keep referring to the Big Green Egg as where there is no flame in it...just hot coals and have had my share of flashbacks and it's scary as hell. Keep the flame!
    pen likes this.
  25. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

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    The woofing is also commonly called back puffing. Not the same thing but kinda feels like water hammer when you slam a faucet shut.

    I also get back puffing if I close down fast. The whole load is off gassing like crazy and suddenly you starve the airflow. Shutting down in stages helps the fire slow gradually. On my catalytic stove I dont have to keep any flame in the box, so long as i shut down slowly.

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