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Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by smoke show, Nov 2, 2011.

  1. mminton

    mminton New Member

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    Eastern Shore MD
    Police Officer

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  2. smoke show

    smoke show Guest

    I didn't do it. :lol:
  3. Flammam

    Flammam Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    Messages:
    252
    Loc:
    Western, Ma.
    Lots of fun cutting titanium isn't it. We do some machining for the navy here and most of the time its titanuim.
  4. rb62

    rb62 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2011
    Messages:
    21
    Loc:
    ohio
    Yes it is. I also bend a lot of cp ti (grade 2) and C276 Hastalloy. We also do alot of stuff for the military. Fun stuff. Love my job though.
  5. naehring2000

    naehring2000 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2012
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    67
    Loc:
    North Shore, MA
    US Navy 2005-2010 MM2(SS) A-Gang

    Currently working as a valve tech for a company that builds valves for steam turbine shaft seal oil regulation systems.
  6. Big E

    Big E Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2012
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    126
    Loc:
    Upstate Panhandle NY
    work for State Govt. Teach people how to plow snow, melt snow, move snow,blow snow...
  7. stoveguy2esw

    stoveguy2esw Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2006
    Messages:
    5,609
    Loc:
    madison hgts. va
    former helicopter armament mechanic, US Army, no longer active duty Nightstalker (C co 1/160th SOAR) currently i am the Senior Customer Support Technician for England's Stove Works Inc. in Monroe Va.


    NSDQ
  8. 4Dtvman

    4Dtvman New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2012
    Messages:
    63
    Loc:
    East Bay of Rhode Island
    Electronic tech. Worked all my life with 12 volts now 480 3 phase (sucks) and a lot of current. Also Marine electrican.


    .
  9. FFRKing

    FFRKing Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2011
    Messages:
    16
    Loc:
    Kansas
    Electronics Technician with United States Postal Service for the last 4 years. Before that, I was a sheetmetal mechanic building Boeing 737's for 5 months, Blowmolding supervisor for a year and a half and injection molding for 16 years. Most of my working life was with Tweco Products Inc., making welding supplies, mig guns, electrode holders, etc. before they moved to Mexico.
    With the current state of the USPS, I hope to hang on until retirement, although that is a long ways away.

    As a hobby/side business, I make and sell the FlagSaver. This is a product invented and patented by my fathers lifelong friend. My father passed away in 2002 and his friend in 2004. When I am making them, it brings back a lot of great memories. It is a great product and saves anyone who flies a flag 24/7 a good amount of money. Most of my customers are school districts and businesses, as well as a lot of residences.


    Chris
    www.theflagsaver.com
  10. smoke show

    smoke show Guest

    I'm a 24/7 flyer.

    I'd like to know the average flag life using the flag saver before I drop 60 bones on a 4x6.
  11. FFRKing

    FFRKing Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2011
    Messages:
    16
    Loc:
    Kansas
    There are so many variables that affect the life of your flag.

    I live in South Central Kansas. When I first started making the FlagSaver, I approached the principal at my daughter's high school one day when he was replacing the flag. He told me that it was normal for their 3x5 to need replaced after 6 weeks, but he would leave it up for 8 weeks to try and save a little money without flying a tattered flag. This is the flag in the video that is on my website. After installing the FlagSaver, he didn't need to replace the flag for 32 weeks. I would consider this a best case scenario and find it typical that flag life is typically tripled.
    Also on my website is a recommendation letter from the Kansas Turnpike Authority. They initially tried one 5x8. 4 weeks later they bought 3 4x6's. 4 weeks after that they bought 2 more 4x6's to send 100 miles north towards Topeka, KS. 4 months after buying the first one, they ordered enough to put one on every flag along the turnpike. Most toll booths have 2 flags on each pole, plus maintenance yards and headquarters. They now have 61 total. When I first approached them about the FlagSaver they were contemplating removing all flags from toll booths except the North and South entrances into Kansas and at Headquarters in an effort to cut costs.

    2 days ago I took an order to replace one for a 10x15 flag at a school district just down the road from the Kansas Speedway by Kansas City. This was the first one I had made for such a large flag and had met the maintenance supervisor at a trade show I had set up a booth at. The cost for it was $288. It was destroyed in a bad storm last week and he wanted one to replace it. After 15 months, he said he had saved over $1500 in flags. Before the FlagSaver he was replacing a $300 flag every 6 weeks. After installing the FlagSaver, he was averaging 14-15 weeks.

    I am in no way a salesman. A huge drawback for me with a product like this. The examples I gave are just some of the comments that I have received since I start making them 2 1/2 years ago. I personally make each one and have sold over 240 to date. My biggest fear is to have one fail. At this point, the 2nd one I made broke (the local high school) after 6 months and the 5th one I sold was stolen. I repaired the broken one free of charge and have changed what failed.

    The only thing I can say is that it is such a simple product, but it does work.

    If you want, send me a phone number by email and a good time to talk in the evening and I will give you a call and answer any more questions you may have.

    Thanks,

    Chris
    www.theflagsaver.com
  12. smoke show

    smoke show Guest

    :lol:


    I think you've answered them all. Thanks Chris
  13. jim3854

    jim3854 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2011
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    Loc:
    Rhode island
    Concrete truck driver Southern Ma.
  14. dfolker4

    dfolker4 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2011
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    25
    Loc:
    northern Michigan
    I am a branch manager for company that does cleaning of department stores all across the country.
  15. The Ds

    The Ds Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2012
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    333
    Loc:
    Western PA, USA
    I am a Reiki Master and Karuna Reiki Master. Dave is a pilot scheduler with a major airline.
  16. pdf27

    pdf27 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2012
    Messages:
    143
    Loc:
    UK
    I'm a vacuum engineer working on a nuclear fusion reactor.
  17. hossthehermit

    hossthehermit Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 17, 2008
    Messages:
    2,095
    Loc:
    Maine, ayuh, by gorry
    I drimk alot
  18. Stovensen

    Stovensen Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    205
    Loc:
    Denmark, EU
    pdf27, please read this:

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/38966/

    Perhaps you have the knowledge to enlighten some worried minds over here.

    The pellets I've burnt for the last four seasons are all made in eastern Europe. Right now I'm burning some pellets from Poland ( Barlinek). In fact these Barlinek pellets have the highest heat output and lowest ash I've experienced so far. But, if they contain even the smallest amount of Caesium 137, then I certainly WILL change to some of the pellets made here in DK ( more expensive, though ).
  19. smoke show

    smoke show Guest

    of what?
  20. BobMac

    BobMac Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2010
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    54
    Loc:
    Mid Michigan
    I was a Tool&Die; maker for 37 years,retired now part time wood stove installer
  21. pdf27

    pdf27 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2012
    Messages:
    143
    Loc:
    UK
    The original article's long since expired, so I can't get any quantitative numbers to go on. A couple of things I can say though:

    1) As isotopes go, it's relatively nasty - the salts are water-soluble and in the UK at least notification to the appropriate government agency is required for relatively small quantities (~3ng)
    2) The actual concentration in Polish soil and in the pellets is likely to be massively below the legal limit*.
    3) Any Caesium in the pellets (and I guarantee you that any pellets you buy WILL contain some Caesium, if in extremely low quantities) will be concentrated in the ash, with next to nothing going up the chimney.

    Personally, I wouldn't worry about it at all - your ionising radiation dose rate from medical X-rays and cosmic rays when flying will dwarf any dose rate you get from a wood stove unless you're buying pellets made in Chernobyl. However, if you're worried there are two things you can do that will reduce your dose rate from incredibly insignificant to too small to measure:

    1) Don't eat the ash ;)
    2) Don't spread the ash on any part of the garden you're growing things you intend to eat in.

    In reality, Brazil Nuts are a far greater radiation risk than your wood pellets are likely to be (no joke - we've had a discussion at work recently where we decided that by the rules we work to if you've been eating Brazil Nuts and use a toilet, then technically you can't flush it without permission from Health Physics. We're thinking of waiting until the 1st of April to try explaining that one to them :) )


    * The legal limit is almost certainly many times below the safe limit. Legal limits are set by taking cancer rates in those whose exposure rate is known - in reality almost exclusively atom bomb survivors - and assuming that cancer rates drop off linearly with dose. We're almost certain that this isn't true and that human beings can cope quite well with low radiation doses - witness the fact that cancer rates in areas with high natural radiation levels are much the same as those with low levels - but it's a sensible precaution. This suspected safe level is divided by ~10 to give dose rates for registered radiation workers (whose health is followed for the rest of their lives - when I signed up for my current job I had to let them have full access to my medical records for the rest of my life). The radiation worker dose rate is divided by 20 in the UK to arrive at the permitted dose rate to the public.
  22. neumsky

    neumsky Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2011
    Messages:
    624
    Loc:
    Oklahoma City
    There is some double standard stuff going on here...this should have been moved to another section.
  23. hossthehermit

    hossthehermit Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 17, 2008
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    2,095
    Loc:
    Maine, ayuh, by gorry
    Usually Gold Crown vodka, but if yer offerin' something else, I ain't picky.
  24. smoke show

    smoke show Guest

    I always have beer on hand.
  25. movemaine

    movemaine Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2011
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    480
    Loc:
    Central Maine
    I am a Web Developer at L.L.Bean - additionally, on the side, I do web development web design, logo & branding design, etc. etc.

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