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What surge protector should be used on a pellet stove?

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by Wi Thundercat, Feb 10, 2010.

  1. Wi Thundercat

    Wi Thundercat Feeling the Heat

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    Going to pull the trigger on a pellet stove and will be installing it next week. Wondering if someone could enlighten me on a good surge protector. I have read these are a must have item! Thanks to the members of this forum for all the help you have provided! :coolsmile: Wi T-Cat

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  2. Excell

    Excell Feeling the Heat

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    Any thing in the $50.00 range that is on sale ,should be good .
  3. opus74

    opus74 Member

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    You may want to consider a combination UPS & Surge Supressor.
    I got a Tripp-Lite model that lasts about 20 minutes if everything is on high speed.
    It was only about $80, and keeps the fire burning during short outages.
  4. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    I just fried two surge protectors when using my genset for backup power last weekend. The voltage regulator had gone bad and it was sending 138 volts down each leg of my house's panel and surge protectors begin to dump voltage at 125 volts so in time they were cooked.

    The UL boys set a standard UL1449 that applies to surge protectors. Be sure your has this listing, even cheap ones will have it but not all of them.

    There are a couple of ratings that are meaningful on surge protectors but none are more obvious than the joules of energy that they will absorb. This is what you will find that drives the cost. If you can find a UL1449 protector with less than 1 nanosecond reaction time, 330 volt clamping (not higher), and a healthy 3000+ joule rating then it will be good. I like the protectors that claim to be "conditioners" as well but the specs are loose on those.

    Cost is not a way to buy a protector. They are all made in China, look at the specs.

    Another thing I do is pick them up. I would rather buy the heavier one.
  5. Augmister

    Augmister Minister of Fire

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    Are you running a generator, when the electricity goes out, for back up power when the stove is on? A surge protector alone won't cut it. You want a unit that will also act as a power conditioner and regulate the spikes that generator power can create. Very much a must have for all computers, (this is a hard drive KILLER) and other "precious" high tech gadgets, toys and necessities.....
  6. Wi Thundercat

    Wi Thundercat Feeling the Heat

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    Yes i have a boliy pro 3600SI+ that i could use it there was a power outage.
  7. imacman

    imacman Guest

    Just picked up 2 of the TrippLite TravelCube units. I was looking for something small & compact for the kids computer and the pellet stove, as I decided that the new iMac and wireless router system needed the TrippLite UPS I had more than the stove did.

    Surprisingly, the specs on the TravelCube are pretty good, and I paid $22 for both including shipping from ewiz.com.

    SURGE / NOISE SUPPRESSION
    AC suppression joule rating 950 joules
    AC suppression response time < 1 ns
    Protection modes Includes full normal mode (H-N) and common mode (N-G / H-G) line surge suppression
    Clamping voltage (RMS) 150V
    UL1499 let through rating 330V - UL Verified
    EMI / RFI filtering Up to 20dB
    $10,000 Ultimate Lifetime Insurance (US & Canada only)
    Approvals Exceeds IEEE 587 category A&B specifications

    Attached Files:

  8. rad3110

    rad3110 New Member

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    why not use a Ground Fault interupter outlet? or why not plug a surge strip into an existing outlet? I guess these Tripplite's are throw aways?
  9. imacman

    imacman Guest

    The "surge strips" you see people use for their computers are mostly junk.....won't protect anything. And some stove manufacturers don't want you to use a GFI on a pellet stove.

    Yes, I'm assuming they are throw aways....but at the price I paid, it's not a big deal.
  10. rad3110

    rad3110 New Member

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    your absolutely right. the umits you bought are a buck or two more then a GFI
  11. lmjr

    lmjr Member

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    Sorry but GFI's by design are NOT for lightning/surge/voltage spikes.

    GFI's are for protecting people from everyday 120vac electrocution.
  12. lmjr

    lmjr Member

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    More Bang for your buck:

    Whole-House-Surge-Suppressor-Surge-Protector

    @ 950 joules

    This is one example...a Google Search will give you many to choose from. :)

    If you needed 2 or 3 Good Strips...might make more sense to do your whole house at service panel.

    My 2 cents...YMMV!
  13. twojrts

    twojrts Feeling the Heat

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    I got a Cyber Power Battery Back up. 390 watts . guaramteed Lightning & Surge protection. Got it at Comp USA.

    Hope I didn't waste my $$.
  14. imacman

    imacman Guest

    What are the specs? Joules? Clamping voltage, etc?
  15. twojrts

    twojrts Feeling the Heat

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    Input Votage on Utility - 90V to 140V.........Input Frequency - 57 Hertz to 63 Hertz..............On-Battery Output Voltage 120VAC (plus sign w/minus sign under it)5%..........Transfer time 4mns typical

    Joules - 890

    Not sure what you mean by Clamping Voltage, etc.

    What kind did you all get and where did you get it? Would I be better off to return this one and check out a stove store?
  16. timjk69

    timjk69 Member

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    I understand that a GFCI outlet is for shock protection only. Someone above said that it is not recommended for pellet stoves stoves. Explain that?
  17. imacman

    imacman Guest

    I think that the stove manufacturers don't want a GFI on a pellet stove due to the high initial surge of current during start-up....it could "fool" the GFI into thinking it was a short, and trip the unit. For someone who has their stove on a stat and relies on it to heat the house during the day while no one is home, this could create a problem.

    This is the info that Englander has in their owners manual about the subject:

    "Test your 110-volt outlet for current and then plug in the unit. (Must be a 15A circuit minimum, should be 20A if circuit is GFIC protected. We highly recommend a surge protector for our unit, as the control panel is electronic)."
  18. relxn88

    relxn88 Member

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  19. lmjr

    lmjr Member

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    Exactly correct...and also if you are away from home or asleep and GFIC trips you have a Power Failure Situation and a hot stove full of smoldering fuel and no motors that do their job.

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