1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

When do you stop cutting for the year?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by CowboyAndy, Oct 16, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. CowboyAndy

    CowboyAndy New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    744
    Loc:
    Chateaugay, NY
    This is our first year, so we are still working out a system, but basiclly we have been cutting non stop since march. Cut 7 cords for this year, and 4 for next year. We go for 2-3 hours at a time, a few times a week. My plan now is to have half of next years, and resume in early spring getting the other half for 09/10.

    Do you have a certain time in the year when you stop cutting?

    Do you keep going as long as you can to get as much as you can?

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. MadTripper

    MadTripper New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Messages:
    40
    Loc:
    Northeast PA
    I had a triaxle delivered this year so I'll stop when it is all cut, split and stacked. I personally like cutting in the winter months because it gives me a reason to get outside more often. With the wood we have from the delivery and some other stuff I will scrounge, we will have 2 years worth.

    Tripper
  3. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2008
    Messages:
    3,700
    Loc:
    CNY
    I try and do wood related chores for 30-60 minutes a day weather permitting so progress is made and the drudgery is eliminated. The only time that we work over an hour per day is in late fall when trees are harvested. Then it's one tree a day till about 20-25 logs are staged up for spring C&S;-ing. Mostly snow and wind are the show stoppers.

    Harvesting is the hardest work cause we aren't looking for the easy takes. It's starts with the biggest trees, then the forked trees...there's a pecking order and often times a ladder and rope is involved to avoid hang ups.

    Last month a bunch of dead trees were marked with engineer tape and they'll be cut during the winter...mostly as something to do but dead trees are also in that pecking order above.

    Andy once you turn the corner and get a year and a half ahead you'll notice real progress cause you're not behind the 8ball. It's a different state of mind knowing you don't HAVE to C&S;anymore you doing it because you enjoy it.
  4. countrybois

    countrybois Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2008
    Messages:
    127
    Loc:
    NE Illinois
    I like to have my logs cut to length by the time winter gets here and then split all through the winter months. There are a couple of reasons for this. One, who wants to be splitting when it is 90 outside, I'd rather, as they say, let the wood heat me twice, once when I'm splitting it, and again when I'm burning it. Second, it splits nicer once it is frozen. This is more of a bonus if you split by hand. I like to have them cut to length prior to winter because it is easier on the chains.
  5. CowboyAndy

    CowboyAndy New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    744
    Loc:
    Chateaugay, NY
    Well, my situation kind of forces me to stop for the year...

    Personally, I enjoy felling, bucking and splitting. The problem is the kids. They aren't old enough to stay home by themselves, but they are old enough to help... but thy are pretty spent from this summer and I don't think its fair to them to make them keep going, plus with homework and all that stuff it leaves less time in the day. Shoot, I would keep going if I could.
  6. MarcM

    MarcM New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2007
    Messages:
    140
    Loc:
    CT/MA/RI border
    *shrug*

    Growing up, we only cut wood in the winter. I only cut this summer so I could have a supply for my first year in my new old house.

    My father cut 4 - 5 cords per winter just on the weekends, with my sister and me helping. I far prefer to cut and split in the winter. I reconfirmed this by cutting my supply this summer. Chainsaw safety gear or maul splitting plus hot weather = major suckage.

    That mindset originated from my father when he was a dairy farmer though. Summer was full of growing feed, winter was for trimming fencelines and cutting wood.
  7. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,471
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    Year round project. More like continual weeding.
    A little here, a little there, it all adds up.

    I have a good size pile of logs t cut that have been placed in the pile all year.
    Cut and split when it gets too cold to garden, or when the back-hoe and bucket come off the tractor and the plow gets put on.
  8. moshiersr

    moshiersr New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    68
    Loc:
    Horseheads NY
    Stop cutting wood?? This is a new concept to me LOL

    year round here... a day here and there.. It better than trying to do it all in a couple weekends.. It's good routine exercise
  9. CowboyAndy

    CowboyAndy New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2008
    Messages:
    744
    Loc:
    Chateaugay, NY
    I agree about the good routine excercise. My biggest set back is having a 2 year old and a wife that doesnt work a set schedule. I am at the mercy of her days off most of the time.

    Im not a big winter person, and it gets pretty cold up here. I could not imagine being out there in anything colder than 40* or so.

    For all those that cut in the winter, what do you do with your saws and stuff around the snow?
  10. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    Messages:
    15,972
    Loc:
    Anderson, Indiana
    Same here I stop when it gets to cold,rain,or just plain run out of wood
  11. MarcM

    MarcM New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2007
    Messages:
    140
    Loc:
    CT/MA/RI border
    40 degrees? Lol, that's approaching my upper threshold for woodwork. I'm comfortable at about 25 degrees. Plus, wood splits much nicer (especially if you do it all by hand) when it's frozen through.

    Snow and ice are both softer than steel. They don't dull your chain. Bar oil is hydrophobic. A little snow on the wood doesn't hurt things.

    For safety, I'll use a traction aid of some sort on my boots if it's real slippery out.

    The real concern is losing my favorite wedge in the snow... :)
  12. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,471
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    Try not to lose it. :)

    Hemlocks and pines usually have no snow under them and the snow is usually wind driven. If the base of a tree is buried you move on. Or shovel.

    I'll have tarps over piles near the garage.
    You pick the good days when you can get at it sometimes.

    I've even taken the snowblower into the woods near a pile where I knew there were no branches to give myself a spot to work.

    Sometimes packed down snow is better than the mud under fresh snow.

    10 degrees isn't so bad if ya keep moving. The wind is what's nasty.
  13. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    14,766
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    Huh???? Thats the best time there is, in my opinion. Thats when you can really get down to work without the sweat dripping in your eyes. I love a nice, crisp, calm, 20 degree, clear winter day. Gets the blood pumping. I'll be down to a sweat shirt and loving it.

    Signed: Big bear Jags. ;-P
  14. moshiersr

    moshiersr New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    68
    Loc:
    Horseheads NY
    I agree, about 25-30 is ideal splitting temperature, maybe even a bit colder if the wind isn't blowing.

    This year I have it easy, I have a pile of logs to cut up into rounds and an already cut up pile of rounds that will probably take me most the winter to split up, but it will get me through 2009-2010 and get me started on 2010-2011 wood.. :)

    The latest project is moving the seasoned stuff into the shed for the winter.. I've got to figure out a better way rather than be moving wood 2-3 times.. lol

    Never had a problem with my saw in the snow..
  15. deadon

    deadon New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2008
    Messages:
    101
    Loc:
    Central Pa
    I cut all year long if the wood is avalable and most times it is. I plan to cut up 6 pickup loads this weekend. A friend has some property that was timbered and tops are laying around. I have enough cut for about 3 seasons for home and at my cabin, about 25 cords. Fall is my favorite time to cut. It is beautiful in the woods and not 90 degrees. I have a husky 350 , 30 ton splitter and a old Ford Ranger woods truck (not road worthy) Have a great time.
  16. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,471
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    Another advantage to cutting and splitting in the Winter is one can stand in one spot , sometimes for hours, without 10 acres of (fast moving) mosquitos fighting over your Deeted epidermis.
  17. deadon

    deadon New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2008
    Messages:
    101
    Loc:
    Central Pa
    Husky sells a winter kit for their saws. Makes cold weather running much easier. Just keep the saw and chain from getting to much snow or being to wet. Great time to cut. I live in the north central region of Pennsylvania, and yes we get the snow.
  18. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,400
    Loc:
    S.NH- Mass's smoking section
    The snow gets too deep, or it's bitter-bitter cold. I am getting better about getting ahead on wood. It's not drudgery at all to me- it's more like a dependence :)

    Wish I was out making trees into neat piles right now.
  19. Dill

    Dill Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Messages:
    329
    Loc:
    Northwood NH
    The only time I don't do wood is mid summer to late fall. I'm just too busy getting hay in to do much else.
    But I try to drop a bunch of trees in the spring to skid out and work on in fall/winter, just in case like last year when there was so much snow I couldn't get into the woods. Then early spring its sugaring season so while I'm cutting its pine and not for the house.
  20. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,471
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    I quit cutting for 2007, does that count ?
    2006, too.
    :)
  21. eba1225

    eba1225 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2007
    Messages:
    312
    Loc:
    Chester Springs, Pa
    Woould have to say that the only time I do not collect wood is Summer as it is to hot. Other than that usually 1 - 2 hours a weekend. I vowed that I would stop when I have obtained 2 years worth of wood stacked, hasn't happened yet but it may happen this year.
  22. pdboilermaker

    pdboilermaker New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2007
    Messages:
    140
    Loc:
    North Central Indiana, Kokomo
    Stop?
  23. Catskill

    Catskill New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    168
    Loc:
    Northern NJ / Northern Catskills NY
    I stop in the summer when it's real hot or when there's snow on the ground. Other than that I just keep cutting.
  24. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,400
    Loc:
    S.NH- Mass's smoking section
    Around here- when there's snow on the ground in the summer, I stop cutting wood and try to fly or time travel. I mean- it could be a sign.
  25. bdog

    bdog New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2008
    Messages:
    48
    Loc:
    Western NY
    I stop when I don't have any wood to cut. Usually I cut less in the summer (bugs, busy with the kids and fishing), and then crank it up big time in the early fall before hunting. Never know, sometimes you find a new spot to look for Bambi's dad. After hunting get going again. Best time of year is during the winter as long as the wind is not howlin', start a fire in the outdoor pit and toss some of the scraps in.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page