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WinterWarm - changes gaskets and now not enough heat

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by DeanBrown3D, Oct 29, 2006.

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  1. DeanBrown3D

    DeanBrown3D New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    193
    Loc:
    Princeton, NJ
    Hello all,

    I have a VC WinterWarm (large) fireplace, and it was giving me plenty of heat, until I replaced the damper and door gaskets (replacement went well, nice and easy job).

    Now I have a loooooong burning fireplace that keeps hot coals alive overnight and even all day. However, since the leaks have gone I can't seem to get it piping hot any more, I mean it terms of standing in front of it 6 feet away and really feeling the heat. I do get loads of heat from the exchanger blowing out and floating up, but in my cathedral ceiling home they are mostly wasted.

    Any tips of making it hotter? Do I need to clear a vent or something? I almost want to remove some of the door gasket, or something.

    Thanks for any help,

    Dean

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  2. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,859
    Loc:
    Eastern Nebraska
    What kind of wood are you burning ?
    How big is the home ?
    Are you saying its not getting hot enough to heat the room or the whole house ?
    Are you running ceiling fans ?
    Are the cathedral ceiling through the whole house ot just the 1 room ?
    Whats your Location?
    Whats the outside air temp as you are running the stove ?
  3. DeanBrown3D

    DeanBrown3D New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    193
    Loc:
    Princeton, NJ
    Maple, Oak.
    3000 sq ft
    Room.
    No Fans.
    One grand room (living room), with cathedral ceilings to a hallway upstairs. Both floors open to other rooms and whole house.
    NJ
    30-40 degrees F.
  4. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,859
    Loc:
    Eastern Nebraska
    High Efficiency - 78% - more heat from less wood,
    Large fireviewing area with clean, durable, ceramic glass,
    Easy swing-out ash pan with cover,
    High heat output - up to 50,000 BTU/hr,
    Rheostat controlled twin fans for heat circulation,
    Very low smoke emissions - 2.1 grams/hour,
    Standard sparkscreen for open fireviewing,
    Solid, durable cast-iron construction,
    Long overnight burn times,
    Solid brass trim around door,
    Conveniently located controls,
    Thermostatic control for steady, even heatOptions,
    Two porcelain enamel color choices: Sand and Midnight,
    Optional Outside air kit,
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    Optional Surround panels to compliment a variety of facing materials for a neat, finished appearance
  5. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,859
    Loc:
    Eastern Nebraska
    Sounds like right off hand you are in need of some ceiling fans to push the heat back down and to move the heat around .

    How hot is it getting up stairs ?
  6. DeanBrown3D

    DeanBrown3D New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    193
    Loc:
    Princeton, NJ
    Now that sounds like a good idea (the fan) - never thought of that. Here's a pic of the room (its a mosaic of 2 pics so I could get it all in).

    Dean

    Attached Files:

  7. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,859
    Loc:
    Eastern Nebraska
    O" Yeah , Your getting the heat ....... up stairs . :)
    50,000 max BTU stove FP with 3,000 sf of home , Lot of house for the stated stove.
    I bet its nice and warm up stairs. Your getting a lot of convection heat ( heated air ) with your stove and it goes straight up. I would think for something like this home set up a radiant style heater to heat the surrounding would help keep some of the heat down stairs to keep it down stairs.

    I think best bet IMO would be to go with a ceiling fan on either side of the hearth as high as you can get on the ceiling.
  8. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Dean I think you were so used to maxing out that stove that 500 /600 degrees seems cool

    It sounds to me that now you have the control you always needed Stoves work best at 24/7 usage constantly building and maintaing heat
    You have to now judge the lenght of burns over a constant 500/ 600 temp range

    Good to see the gaskets on the door was your main problem for overfiring
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