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Wood Dolly - She's A Beauty

Post in 'The Gear' started by WoodNStuff, Oct 22, 2011.

  1. WoodNStuff

    WoodNStuff Minister of Fire

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    For loading my wood into the trailer to bring it home. What do other wood haulers out there use to load wood?

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  2. shawneyboy

    shawneyboy New Member

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    here is what I use....

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  3. jimbom

    jimbom Combustion Analyzer

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    My goodness Shawney, your hands are on backwards. Learn to throw a baseball. You would be un-hittable.
  4. jimbom

    jimbom Combustion Analyzer

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    Looks good. How do you stack the wood on there to get a load? What keeps it from falling off? I have been thinking of something like this myself.
  5. REM505

    REM505 New Member

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    [​IMG]


    Well usually I bring my wood home in some sort of vehicle. Hopefully your wood supply is not too far from home.
  6. RNLA

    RNLA Minister of Fire

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    GLOVES!
  7. WoodNStuff

    WoodNStuff Minister of Fire

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    I use my new dolly to load large, heavy rounds, such as 36"x18" rounds. It makes quick work of loading all the rough cut logs and rounds into my trailer. I used to load this stuff by hand, whether rolling, dragging, lifting etc. With my new dolly I can load my trailer in 20 minutes with big rounds and logs.

    As for moving my split to the woodpile, I use a wheelbarrow. Then I use my hands of course to stack the stuff. Or better yet, I'll have my kids stack the splits.
  8. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    Used the hand truck for some large ash rounds a few weeks back. Had to move them about 75' with some help. Walking backwards with a huge round on there sure burns those legs pretty good...wow...even with some help holding the round on and pushing.
  9. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Bucked up wood loaded by hand to ATV trailer . . . ATV trailer to pick-up bed or ATV/sled/multi-use trailer . . . wood is split and hauled by wheelbarrow to stack outside . . . wood is then hauled by ATV trailer to the woodshed . . . wood is hauled to porch stack with wheelbarrow or canvas carrier . . . and then hauled inside by canvas carrier. Holy cow . . . just realized that I handle my wood excessively.
  10. ISeeDeadBTUs

    ISeeDeadBTUs Guest

  11. WoodNStuff

    WoodNStuff Minister of Fire

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    CTwoodburner, I know what you mean about the leg burn but at least I don't have to worry about the backache.

    firefighterjake, do you really handle your wood that much? Drive wood chunks using my good ole dolly from the the ground to the trailer. When home place wood directly into the splitter from the trailer. Toss splits directly into wheel barrow. Drive wheel barrow to free pallets in the backyard and stack neatly. Then when wood supply is low in the house. Fill wheel barrow with wood. Drive wheel barrow to backside basement window. Open window and toss splits into wood bin located in the basement. When fire low, walk downstairs into basement and retrieve a handful of splits.

    Wow, I handle my wood a lot also. On the up side, I get great outdoorsy exercise without paying $99 a month to get it.
  12. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Yup . . . when you really break down every step it seems like a lot . . . but in reality it doesn't seem so bad when you space it out over time . . . all part and parcel of heating the home cheaply.
  13. lowroadacres

    lowroadacres Minister of Fire

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    Here is what I use to haul wood to the house :)

    I also use a wheelbarrow, a half ton with a truck box trailer behind and on rare occasions I carry the wood across the yard.

    When we designed our basement layout we were able to set things up so the wood stove is right near a basement window which means our teenage boys hand the wood to one another through the window from the stacks right outside the house. Prior to accessing the stacks we use the pallet boxes on the tractor from the piles elsewhere on the yard.

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  14. rottiman

    rottiman Minister of Fire

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    Bring wood up to the house from the shed via loader on the tractor. I use my "Wood Chuck" from carts vermont to move it into the screenroom and into the house. Large diameter wheels make large heavy load e-z as pie to manuver.

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  15. pteubel

    pteubel Feeling the Heat

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    Here's that I used when I would fetch milling logs. 6x12 dump trailer, Warn 3700lb winch, and a couple ramps. Wrap the line over top of the log and back to the trailer. Winch in and the log would just roll up the ramp and drop into the bed....or climb over the other logs in the bed). Worked great even loading by myself.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I kinda miss that trailer. Towed EXTREMELY well, handy for those big CL scores, and a piece of cake to unload :) . But I sold it a couple years ago along with one of my sawmills, shortly after I moved (where I now have plenty of property to harvest, but only trail access).
  16. MrWhoopee

    MrWhoopee Minister of Fire

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    I finally got a little bit smarter. Instead of splitting and throwing onto a pile to be stacked, I moved my splitter right next to the stack. Now I stack directly from the splitter, move the splitter as needed. 8v))
  17. Danno77

    Danno77 Minister of Fire

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    WoodNStuff, load that up and post a picture of it. I'm not seeing how you can carry wood with it.
  18. basswidow

    basswidow Minister of Fire

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    Now that's Slick! I bet you do miss that trailer.
  19. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    Old school log loaders used to be something like that - except instead of rolling or sliding the log up the ramp, the whole 'ramp' would pivot/swing up (eg. around where your ramp pieces are bolted to the trailer) and the log would roll into place. So in this case, you could fasten a cross piece across the ends of the two ramp pieces, and fasten the winch to that instead of the log. Might need some little stakes at the end of the ramps to hold the logs on. Just to give more ideas...
  20. Kenster

    Kenster Minister of Fire

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    I learned that lesson recently when I did my first major splitting with my recently acquired Huskee 35. I moved it into position where I had previously stacked a couple of cords worth of rounds. About a cord of these rounds were fairly dry water oaks that was going to be placed in the stacks already set up and that will be burned either late this year or, most likely, next year. So I just tossed these splits into a pile to be moved later.

    But there was also at least of cord of rounds of post oak and still very wet water oak that I have planned to use in 2013-14. So, as I split these, they went right back on the pallets that had just been vacated by the 2012-2013 rounds that I had split the day before. Those pallets were in arms reach of the splitter. Right off the splitter onto the pallets. Working smart.

    In the future, I'll need to think ahead before I off load the rounds to be split. I'll want to dump or stack the rounds right where I want to split them. Maybe even better yet, when possible I'll split in the field and bring them home ready to go right on the stacks.
  21. ManiacPD

    ManiacPD Member

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    Here's how I move wood:

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  22. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    I'm super jealous of all you guys with your hydraulically assisted wood lifting devices...a.k.a tractor with FEL.
  23. Kenster

    Kenster Minister of Fire

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    Maniac, how much more weight could you handle? Just curious. Wonder how much you're carrying there.
    I thought about a pallet fork for the three point on my 8N. The hydraulics can handle up to 1500 pounds but the front wheels come up around 800. I figure I might be able to tote about as much as you're carrying there.
  24. ManiacPD

    ManiacPD Member

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    I don't know how much it weighs. The pallet is 5' wide x 3.5' high x 3' deep. That's about 52 ft^3, or about .4 cord if it is full. My estimate on how much is there is about 1/4 cd based on measuring and how many trips I made to fill my 8 cord storage area in the garage (31 trips). I'm guessing it weighs around 1,000-1,200 lbs. The rear tires are loaded which makes a huge difference.

    I did nearly fill it on one trip to the boiler room and half way there I hit a bump and did a faceplant. Had to drop the FEL quickly to get the rear tires back on the ground. That front tier puts a lot of weight out there ahead of the front axle and I'm guessing it had around 1600-1800 lbs of weight.
  25. WoodNStuff

    WoodNStuff Minister of Fire

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    Great idea! And if I could get the kids to stack directly from the splitter...well think of the workload savings.

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