1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Wood shed as privacy barrier?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Badfish740, Jun 2, 2014.

  1. Badfish740

    Badfish740 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2007
    Messages:
    1,404
    My neighbors to the rear and one side have 6' stockade fence surrounding their property, so I get a nice privacy barrier for my yard as well. The neighbors to the other side have a 4' chain link fence. My only option for a privacy barrier is to put up a stockade fence, which would probably cost about $700 for the panels, posts, fasteners, and other miscellaneous stuff I would need. Plus, all I'm left with is a fence, which is not very functional for anything other than privacy. I think I may have come up with another option though. Town code allows for "accessory structures" (sheds, decks, etc...) less than 100 SF to placed 5' off of the property line (fences must be 2' off)-additionally there is no permit required for such structures. Here's my thought:

    Along the front half of my property line (5' off) I'll set ten 4 x 4 x 10 posts in the ground 12' apart forming a rectangle 48' long and 2' wide. The posts will be buried Once the posts are set and squared I'll notch them 6" above grade to accept 2 x 6 x 12s. The 2 x 6 x 12s will be supported mid-span by short 4x4 supports that are cut off flush with the top of the 2 x 6s. This way the 2 x 6s are only spanning about 6', which should be plenty for handling the weight. Up top, 2 x 6 x 12s will be run between the ends of the post to serve as bracing, and as something to attach a roof to at some point. Basically this will give me a single row stack 6'-6" high, 2' deep, and 48' long, which is enough for nearly 5 cords of wood. Most importantly, the actual structure will only be 96 SF, exempting me from the permits, and allowing me to take advantage of the 5' setback. It will cost a little less than $400 to construct, so about half as much as the fence and much more useful.

    Eventually I'll put some kind of roof on it, and maybe even a back wall so that even when it's empty in march I'll still have a privacy barrier. Also, since I'll still have 5' between the shed and the fence I can store rounds or split wood that needs a few years before "finishing" in the shed. Here's a rough drawing of what two sections would look like (it would have taken too long to draw the rest):

    [​IMG]

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2012
    Messages:
    1,314
    Loc:
    Upstate NY
    What do they call those cement things in Iraq? T- walls? If only you could really use woodpiles to block out your neighbors. $400.00 is cheap for such a thing.
  3. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    Messages:
    3,654
    Loc:
    Central Mass
    I think its brilliant, you going to stack two rows deep? You can just overhang the roof a bit to keep the wood dry if you do that.
  4. peakbagger

    peakbagger Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    Messages:
    1,595
    Loc:
    Northern NH
    My concern would be frost. One side will have different sun exposure than the other and the fairly tall skinny structure may slowly tilt in the direction that has more sun exposure.
  5. tsquini

    tsquini Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2009
    Messages:
    552
    Loc:
    North Shore, MA
    You are on to something here. I would not set posts into the ground. Something more fluid and flexible may be beneficial.

    Attached is an image from a few years on the hearth.com. This kind of set up would allow you to move the racks around the yard where needed.

    Attached Files:

  6. Badfish740

    Badfish740 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2007
    Messages:
    1,404
    I've seen that type of setup before-it looks like there are some shims jammed into the voids in the block to stabilize 4x4s. Definitely easier to adapt and move around as needed.
  7. TradEddie

    TradEddie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    701
    Loc:
    SE PA
    Minus the 'legs' that's essentially what I use as a privacy fence, but using 2x4's, keeping each rack small, your 6ft+ high stack of wood isn't something I'd like to load, or have topple on anyone. Mine hold about a face cord in each. I used Onduraga brand corrugated roofing with a slight rearward slope, it's cheap and looks good. I don't have a rear wall because I want good air circulation, the racks get filled back up eash spring.

    TE
  8. macattack_ga

    macattack_ga New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2013
    Messages:
    50
    Loc:
    Fairfax, VA
    can you work a lattice back into the design so you will still have privacy when the rack is empty?
  9. bobdog2o02

    bobdog2o02 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2014
    Messages:
    483
    Loc:
    Lancaster, Pennsylvania
    Thats a good idea, allows airflow and gives privacy
  10. STIHLY DAN

    STIHLY DAN Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2013
    Messages:
    529
    Loc:
    So NH
    I have a 150 ft privacy fence 6/61/2 ft high 5 ft wide. works great wont fall over and you can stack it right on the line. no taxes, permits, or money, and frees up the yard for other things.
  11. WiscWoody

    WiscWoody Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2011
    Messages:
    779
    Loc:
    NW Wisconsin where us fools live
    I make these racks and at 5 1/2 foot tall they are tipsy during the thaw. You can put long patio blocks down to stabilize them and it helps, or support riggers. It's what you see in my avatar pic. image.jpg
  12. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    15,072
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    Wasn't it Carbon Neutral that had that really nice woodshed/fence ... along with a secret stash for his primo wood?
    RockyFordOak78 likes this.
  13. blades

    blades Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Messages:
    1,514
    Loc:
    WI, Milw
    Fence- 40 yards worth two rows deep mosly 18"+ splits. about 5.5' high

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 2, 2014
    pma1123 likes this.
  14. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Messages:
    1,032
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    wait, your fence will only be 4 ft long?
  15. NRGarrott

    NRGarrott New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2013
    Messages:
    87
    Loc:
    Annapolis, MD
    1 apostrophe means a foot. 2 apostrophes mean inches. So 4" is 4 inches. 48' is 48 feet.:)
  16. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Messages:
    1,032
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    yes, didn't see it correctly. have you considered whether your neighbors would like seeing 48' of drying wood? also, would they blame you if a ant/spider/mouse issue develops along the stack?
  17. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2013
    Messages:
    1,032
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    i guess this could used for a wall or 2 of a storage shed. I need to build a small 8x6 shed to get my tractor and yard tools out of the garage.
  18. macattack_ga

    macattack_ga New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2013
    Messages:
    50
    Loc:
    Fairfax, VA
    48' of drying wood (2 rows deep 5' high) looks pretty good to me and adds a lot of privacy! (that's a "tree house" on the right)

    IMG_20140627_203338_539.jpg
  19. brokenknee

    brokenknee Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2012
    Messages:
    140
    Loc:
    about 30 miles NW of Bemidji MN
    Back when I lived in the city, the city had an ordnance just for firewood; had to be 5 feet off the property line. The neighbor had thier firewood right on my fence. I did not have a problem with it until she started a neighbor war; even though they had their wood there for years, once the war started I called the city. They ended up moving there wood.

    Just saying make sure about city regulations before you build. You may get along with your neighbor now but you don't know years down the road or if a new neighbor moves in.

    I have since moved to the country and can not even see my closest neighbor, we get along fine.

Share This Page