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wood splitter question...

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by crow, Dec 25, 2005.

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  1. JAred

    JAred New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    125
    what if a log gets stuck on there and whops you in the head and takes your knee cap off?

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  2. crow

    crow New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2005
    Messages:
    88
    Loc:
    Ohio
    That's a pretty cool tool. If you have rear wheel drive...
    Did you watch the video? Makes it look SO easy. Who thinks up this stuff?
  3. carpniels

    carpniels Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    536
    Loc:
    Rome, NY, USA
    Hi Guys,

    I had to look up what you huys are talking about: Limbing? Bucking?

    limbing is cutting the branches of the trunk. I can see that being dangerous, since the trunk can move if you cut the supporting limbs off. Plus the tree trunk is not between you and the chain.

    Bucking is cutting the trunk is long sections. Is that correct? If so, who does that? If you are a pro, maybe, but certainly not a home user, right? I cut the trunk up in 18 inch sections. Works fine.

    Any comments?

    Carpniels

    PS. Limbing makes me nervous too. Tine branches and too much power. I know why some guys have smaller saws for that reason, but I can only afford one saw so I bought a good and powerful one. Not the best for 2 inch branches.
  4. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    I been meaning to get in touch with you,congrats on the Jotul. Too bad you never saw the advantages of a working combustor
    in that Intrepid. As I experiment with mine I am learning how to get longer fruitfull burn times. Made it threw the night last night 17 degrees woke up this morning at 7:00 am 69 inside with enough coals to easilly fire the added splits.

    Back to the post: The quickest way to limb, I use a sharp ax on all branches 2" and under. Most important advice is to get good footing, don't reach, and keep the work area clear. Another thing I do if the log is off the ground I put splits or blocks under them so when cut they are still off of the ground. Every situation and tree are different You have to look at it and plan your best approach.
    On instance it might be best to start at the top and work back Reducing the weight and binding potential some situations might mean working top and bottom to the middle all depends on that situation. one learns from experience
  5. crow

    crow New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2005
    Messages:
    88
    Loc:
    Ohio
    The Black and Decker Alligator Lopper came today. Looks much less intimidating than the chainsaw did.
    It's raining cats and dogs out here, so I have not tried it out yet.
    1st dry day we get , and I'll give you my report. It looks like it's a good size to deal with the size splits I need to cut .
    If this solves my problem, I'll be thrilled.
    If it doesn't , I'll have a great tool I can use to safely cut down a good deal of the growth that's taking over parts of my lot .
  6. crow

    crow New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2005
    Messages:
    88
    Loc:
    Ohio
    The alligator lopper works GREAT!
    I'm so relieved.
    We had a beautiful , dry day today. It was even sunny, and not too cold.
    So I split about a 16"x36"x8' pile of wood with my easy splitter, and then gave the Black&Decker lopper a run at bucking it all down to a size small enough to feed my little stove.

    It made pretty quick work of the job. Very little kick back. I really like that it has jaws, and that the outer edge of the blade is covered.
    Occasionally a log would rotate when the saw bites into it and there was a little torquing action, but if you have a good grip on the thing , it was no problem.

    The best part was bringing my wood inside, loading up the stove front to back (which I couldn't do before) doing a modified log cabin stack to capacity , lighting a super cedar firestarter in the center(thanks Thomas!) , and presto! the easiest fire I've had since I got this stove. JUST GREAT!
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