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Wood Storage...where?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by jmhpsu93, Dec 10, 2008.

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  1. jmhpsu93

    jmhpsu93 New Member

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    Now that we're about to get out wood stove installed, I'm anticipating the need to store (season) several cord of wood on my property. I don't exact have a "back 40", or even a "front 2" for that matter, so where would be a good place to store wood?

    If I store 3-6 cord of wood near the house (within 15-20 feet), should I be concerned about the bug population (including but not limited to: termites, spiders, wasps, European hornets) if I store it not touching the ground?

    Or should I store it as far away from the house as possible?

    I'll be storing the wood that's ready to use during the winter on our covered porch.

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  2. Shipper50

    Shipper50 Minister of Fire

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    I would worry about the sun and air the wood can get and not let the bugs be a main concern. I used to store my wood in an area that I thought was good for seasoning till I moved it more into the sun and wind and it sure made a difference. If you have an area that is close without being on top of the house, and it gets good sun and wind, that is where I would put it.

    Shipper
  3. Risser09

    Risser09 New Member

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    Since most property lines are straight, stack your wood along them. Make sure to find the spot where prevailing winds will strike perpendicular to the stack and where a lot of sun will shine. Try not to have it too far away from the house.
  4. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    1) I've never noticed a difference in bugs regardless of the type and condition and amount of firewood I have stored.


    2) Store wood off the ground
  5. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    This is what I've done, I've used my wood to create a border/fence. What I did was stake out the property lines and then ran a string down them to keep the rows straight. I bought 4x8x16 blocks and PT landscaping timbers from home depot to stack the wood on. Seems to work very well for me.
  6. eba1225

    eba1225 Feeling the Heat

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    Good advice from all but I unfortunately do not listen to it. I have two stages/locations for wood. When I aquire it it goes directly to stage one which is at the back of my 2 acres at which point I cut to size, split and stack for seasoning. At the beginning of the burn season I move that years wood closer to the house (30'). I feel that by keeping a majority of the wood away from the house/in the back of the property it keep the rest of the property neater and cleaner.

    All wood is stored off the ground once it gets split.
  7. Risser09

    Risser09 New Member

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    Sounds like someone who is lucky enough to have 2 acres. =-)
  8. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    For what it's worth = if storage area is minimal a Holtz Hausen type stack is known to house many-o-cord with a small foot print. If interested, use the search function and you will find hours of reading material.
  9. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    I was going to top that with my 18 acres but to the OP's point, it's irrelevant.

    A holtz hausen sounds like it could be aesthetically pleasing if one doesn't have the option to build a nice woodshed.
  10. cityevader

    cityevader New Member

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    I'll reply to the bug question (although I'm no entomologist!)....You can't do anything about it!

    Carpenter ants and termites tend to damage wood as a result from nesting. Ants certainly don't go out searching for wood to eat. Some subterranean termites may possibly surface to feed on wood, but they don't "travel" for it.

    However, once a year, both will send out huge swarms on the wing and fly all over the place, so it doesn't matter how far away from the house the woodpile is...kinda like believing locking your doors are going to stop a determined thief from robbing you. Best thing to do is not worry about it to the point that it robs you of your sanity.
  11. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    I'll just chime in and suggest to MMandm that in a partially shaded area it's best to store wood so it can at least get morning sun. The morning sun will help season the wood by preventing prevent mildew/moss from accumulating.
  12. JBinKC

    JBinKC Feeling the Heat

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    Spiders and wood borers seem to be my biggest pest problems. The wood borers seem content in the wood and all they do is make a powdery mess. Spiders in the wood pile doesn't bother me while the wood seasons as they serve a purpose killing other pests and they are either dead or dormant when you need the wood.

    It might be wise to store your wood in a large covered plastic bin to confine the wakening dormant bugs when you bring the wood inside when you need it.

    Termites and carpenter ants are really an overexaggerated problem. As long as you take precautionary measures and deprive them of water or mud the wood will stay free of those pests and even wood infested with those pests will not survive.

    In terms of storage I don't have much room either as I really don't even have a yard but I manage to store 2 1/2 cords of wood. All I can say is you get creative.
  13. xjnuttier

    xjnuttier New Member

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    Hey guys, I actually used to be a pest exterminator, and actually yes termites do travel for food, and a wood pile is ideal they are subterranian, and do travel through mud tubes. those are the workers, the ones you are refering to that swarm in spring, which means there is an active colony, out searching for food, AKA wood. they are the swarmers. The termite colony is quite complex and very sofisticated,a nd never underestimate there power. termites are one of the most destructives pests anywhere. the worst termites are the formosans, which live in the south they can destroy a homw within a year. amazing but very true. always keep wood supplies away from your home, dont keep your stockpile close to buildings. I mean i keep my week supply on my back porch but I keep my main supply back about 50 feet from the houise and away from any other wood structurres. The problem with termites is you usually dont realize you have them until you have an issue witht eh ome, and then it costs a lot of money unless you know what to look for, including those swarmers. I would seriously consider having a professional come in and do a inspection of your home for termites, it is usually free, and walk with him and learn a lot, you will be amazed. the reason i suggest an inspection is because they do travel for food and if you see swarmers you have an active establisehed colony, and acolony usually consists of several million wood eating pests.. termites like damp they need to travel back into the earth daily because they need moisture. if you dont have downspouts and let the rain run right into your foundation not to mention damp basement, perfect area for termites,a nd of course put some frsh cut right up against a home and free dinner. termites are blind they travel by there other senses, and they think wood. they are the workers then you have the soilders which defend the colony from attacks, and of course the swarmers which hunt food. and a king and a queen which stay in the colony. of course to produce more termites. honestly they are amazing like i said earlier, they all have there own job and do it 24/7 and 365... the workers actually travel back to feed the colony every day along with getting into the moisture of the earth...
  14. xjnuttier

    xjnuttier New Member

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    I did not touch on carpenter ants, but they are as destructive as termites but enter usually from an opposite source. limbs haging over roofs is the biggest culprit of accessing carpenter ants into your structure. so if you have overhaning limbs get up there and do some trimming , I just dealt with them at my moms house, right off of a chery branch was the access... and the key sign you will find from ants and actually wood boring beetles is frass.. aka very fine sawdust, and if the ants are big enough fairly larger pieces of chips is you would ant size chips.. wood beetles are easy to erradicate, and are carpenter ants. termites are the real devils to deal with especially if your home is on a well for your drinking water, much more expensive treatment.
  15. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Termites and ants need a moist place. If there is a termite or ant problem in the house, most likely there is also a moisture problem. If you store wet wood in the house, you provide a moist habitat both in the firewood and in the moist house that the wet wood creates.
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