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Wood Stove as a "Fireplace"

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by jimmiller2, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. jimmiller2

    jimmiller2 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2008
    Messages:
    43
    Loc:
    Tennessee
    I am planning to build a structure 26' by 36' to be called a garage/storage and later be turned into
    an apartment in the woods. I plan to make as the center piece a central all metal and brick 3 foot
    by 8 foot wide and floor to ceiling (8') room. It will house a lower wood burning element and above that
    a blower and heat exchanger coil for the split unit heat pump. My question is what to use for the wood
    burning portion. I am thinking about the following and would like opinions and advice. Create a lower
    shelf that becomes the ceiling above a Englander glass front stove that is framed in (all metal/brick)
    with the 6" stove pipe coming thru the shelf/ceiling into the upper chamber that will house the
    heat pump indoor components and on up thru atic and roof. In other words the wood stove will
    be recessed into a 8 foot wide 3 foot deep 3 foot high metal and brick enclosure and will look like
    a fireplace. The airflow of the stove's built in fan system will blow heat out the front like it normally
    would and the heat radiated into the enclosure will be extracted by another fan system. Would
    this work?

    Thanks
    JM

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  2. jimmiller2

    jimmiller2 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2008
    Messages:
    43
    Loc:
    Tennessee
    Since making this post I have looked at the photo gallery and found other options that will accomplish the same
    objective. I have also been looking at stoves. Does anyone have a first hand opinion on United States stove?
    Specifically the model 2000 which is sold thru Lowes and the company just happens to be a 45 minute drive
    from my house.

    JM
  3. swagler85

    swagler85 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2012
    Messages:
    1,195
    Loc:
    NE Ohio
    I have the 2500 model. Just a lil bigger than the 2000. I like it, it burns good. Don't get really long burn times out of it like some other stoves
  4. jimmiller2

    jimmiller2 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2008
    Messages:
    43
    Loc:
    Tennessee
    The stove looks good and the price thru Lowes is also a plus.

    Thanks
    Jim Miller
  5. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    14,641
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    Hmmm...doing it from ground up I would at least consider a masonry heater. Search the forum. Lots of posts on them.
  6. dougand3

    dougand3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    Messages:
    734
    Loc:
    North Alabama
    Basically, you're planning a stove in a brick alcove in the center of the room. Somewhat akin to a masonry heater. If someone lives there full time in winter, I'd guess it would work fine. If going there just on weekends, it would take longer to heat room with brick absorbing heat from cold start fires. Once heated, the brick will radiate heat longer. And added expense of blowers to move heat out of alcove.
    Depending on how well insulated structure is, I'd guess the us stove 2000 would be more than enough.
    Another option: Freestanding stove in center of room, air handler in attic, decorative surround box/table/counter around stove for the 7 months it's not used.
    I'm 45 mins west of South Pittsburg. You ever go to world famous cornbread festival?
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    46,003
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    I think I would let go of this idea and rethink the plan. First, heating and cooling have very different needs. Second, you will get much better efficiencies and lower costs by separating these functions. And last, why go to all this expense for a very basic, inexpensive wood stove like the 2000? My recommendation would be to install a high quality mini-split system with one or two interior head units. Mitsubishi, Fujitsu and Daikin all make good units for this application. Then build a nice basic hearth for the woodstove. You can veneer the back wall with brick or stone if you wish. The net heating effect will be about the same.

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