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Wood stove/fireplace surround update HELP!!

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Zee20, Apr 22, 2013.

  1. Zee20

    Zee20 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    Oregon
    We've got this wood stove, with a brick surround fireplace and mantle that I desperately want to update while still keeping the stove. (I've already got plans to update the surrounding shelves and we installed the red oak flooring ourselves a few years back).

    I'd like to do some kind of tile over the brick, but could suffer with just a paint job on it. As you can see from the photos the wood stove rests directly on the brick and I can't see how to get around it. (I don't think we are going to be able to remove the stove, do the work, and put it back in. It just weighs too much and I don't want the risk of hurting the floors.) Also, what kind of tile etc. should I use??? All the tile over brick updates I've seen don't have a wood stove... If paint, what kind can tolerate being so close to the stove?

    Next is the mantle, in the picture below you can see how there is kind of heat deflector plate attached to the existing mantle. We'd really like to do something beautiful for the mantel (it has so much potential!), but I am worried about the heat coming off the stove and ruining it.... Must we have a deflector plate? Any and all advice welcome!!!

    I've done a lot of research, but not seen a set-up like ours. Am I just kidding myself or is this a doable project? Should I just hire a professional? I love DIY, but just researching this has been a pain.




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  2. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    4,472
    Loc:
    southern Indiana
    Hire a pro to remove the stove, and if there is any money in the budget, replace it with an efficient one. A nice looking stove or insert would IMHO go further in appearance than re-doing the brick and mantel.
    If you end up re-facing the fireplace, remove the stove. Otherwise you will always wish you had taken the time to do it right.
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    48,165
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Stoves this heavy are moved all the time. I like to put down sheetmetal to slide it out on. A square of plywood underneath it will protect the floor while it is out. Fireplace can be tiled. Technically this installation may not be up to code. An unlisted stove like this is supposed to have 36" clearance to the sides unless there is a UL plate on the back specifying closer clearances. If that is the case heat shields on the side woodwork would also be advised. The mantel shield can be painted with high temp paint to blend in with the new look, but is necessary as long as the mantel is combustible.
  4. Dave A.

    Dave A. Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2013
    Messages:
    617
    Loc:
    SE PA
    If you want a wood mantle without the heat shield you're going to have to go about 48" above the hearth (bottom of the stove) -- probably about a foot higher than you now have it. So you'd have to fill in about 1' above where the brick stops with tile/masonry -- non-combustible material before any wood can be safely placed (unless you go with a very small stove/insert with lower clearances). As was implied, if you go with a stone mantel or cast cement material (non-combustible) you won't have to raise it.
  5. Zee20

    Zee20 New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    Oregon
    Thanks guys,

    I believe the last time we had the fireplace serviced, they said the stove was no longer up to code. (Installed in 1977), and if they had to pull it out for any reason they wouldn't be able to put it back in.(I think, maybe that was just moving it one location to another, but he was pretty adamant about NOT moving it)

    I will look into replacing the stove, but I welcome any more comments or suggestions.
  6. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    Messages:
    4,945
    Loc:
    Ridge, LI, NY
    Hi Zee, welcome to the forums !!

    I have to agree with installing another stove/insert, as well as suggesting that the bookcase framing (at least) close to the FP be removed (those damned safety & clearance to combustible issues, ya know!!??!!) Depending on house layout, you've got a lot of options.

    Nice looking FP !!
  7. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Messages:
    10,358
    Loc:
    Bend, OR
    If you really want to do this thing the right way, then start researching modern, efficient, UL-listed, EPA-certified wood burning appliances...free-standing stoves and inserts. Also explore the world of pellet-burning appliances. Whoever told you that as soon as this thing is removed from where it is it can't legally be put back in is spot on here in Oregon. It needs to be replaced for at least a couple of reasons, anyway. Wood or pellet burning insert is probably your best bet, based on the masonry "infrastructure" you're working with. The combustible mantel can be replaced with brick by a competent mason, and be quite attractive. In any case, my $.02 is ditch the old stove and open up your mental solution space. C'mon, it'll be fun! :cool: Rick

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