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Woodstock Fireview. What to do if stove top gets hot.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Backwoods Savage, Jan 18, 2013.

  1. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    Yes, this happened to my Fireview and once I fixed it, it was a whole different animal. .75-1 is where I ran my Fireview and it would only get up into that 700 range at the lower end with no flame.

    The Keystone may look similar fire box wise but there's one big difference, the Keystone has a small 1/4" hole drilled into the back of the ash pan housing that allows a little more combustion air into the fire box. I have found I can burn the Keystone on much lower settings than the Fireview on the same chimney. I also think the Keystone has a little more control than the Fireview and I've had many less OH CHIT moments.

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  2. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    I think I learned about this from you.:p
  3. fox9988

    fox9988 Minister of Fire

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    I double checked the air restrictor plate, it is sitting flat in the bottom, looks good to me. I do loose flame below ~.75, but the cat still glows. I probably burn at lower temps than most of you; mild climate, 1536 sq.ft. heated, well insulated and VERY tight. It looks like I will get by with 1 (one) cord of wood this winter, burning 24/7, only heat source. Yeah, I'm a light weight.;)
    Todd thanks for weighing in, you're one of the few that have owner both stoves. There isn't much Keystone discussion going on this year, so I try to relate the FV tips/techniques to my stove. I also didn't know about the 1/4" air hole. I'm wondering why a full load of ashes doesn't block the hole and change the burn? I'll have to check that out. The Keystone cat assembly seems to insulate the stove top and thermometer form the heat until the cat is engaged and active (creating a huge lag in STT). I'm typically through the whole reload process (regulating single wall pipe temp at ~450), cat glowing, before I see Any change in STT. I use the STT more like an odometer than a speedometer. Is the FV cat set up the same and do FV owners see such a long lag?
    In bypass mode things can change in a hurry. My single wall pipe can rise ~100::F per min on full draft. After initial flames, I cut the draft back to 2 for ~20, then engage.
    Dennis, sorry to derail your FV thread with Keystone talk. I'll try to keep the hijacking at a minimum from here on out.
    charly and Backwoods Savage like this.
  4. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    You can open the bypass and the stove top will cool but if you are doing this you may have to do it several times or else just leave the bypass open for a longer period of time. But if you do it by giving it more air then you are not wasting any heat at all and are getting the full benefit.

    Once the stove top temperature is down to maybe 680 or lower, you simply then go to your normal draft setting and enjoy the heat and the fire show. Our normal burn setting is about .75.
    rideau likes this.
  5. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    If you are getting back puffing, then you want more air rather than less. And yes, closing down in increments is usually a good way to go. Many times I'll set the draft at 1.5 when engaging the cat then after maybe 5 minutes drop it to the normal operating setting.
  6. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Not sure what you are doing wrong Matt as you don't state how you are operating the stove.

    Reloading too soon? Not sure what you mean there but when the stove gets down to coals, it is time to reload. If we have a large coal bed then I'll just level them out before putting wood in. If for an overnight load, then I want to push the coals forward a bit so that the bottom rear piece has very few if any coals underneath it. The rest of the load is just a matter of fitting in the pieces.

    Then we wait until the wood is fairly charred which can be anywhere from 5-15 minutes but normally close to 10. We watch both the stove top and flue temperature. Stove top we want to 250 or more. Flue we go from 400-500. I do think perhaps this could be different on a vertical flue. Ours is horizontal so I think perhaps we get a hotter reading sooner than with a vertical flue.

    So the flue is at, say 450. Stove top is at 250 or more and I turn the draft down to 1.5 and engage the cat. Then wait a few minutes, normally not more than 5 and if all looks good the draft then goes to .75 and I go to bed.

    Daytime reloads are very similar except that we just level the coals and not push them forward. Usually these loads do not fill the stove either and most times when engaging the cat we can go right to .75 and all is well.

    Hope this helps.
    charly likes this.
  7. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    I see discussion on taking up to 45 minutes to get the Fireview to 200 stove top. For sure if you are starting a cold stove the stone could be heated to quickly but I doubt it would be for that time. Most times we have engaged the cat by 30 minutes and we engage at 250 or above. The big key to getting the Fireview warmed up is to not leave the draft open full with the bypass opened. By doing this most of the heat just goes flying up the chimney. Once we get the fire going good we drop the draft to 50% and this warms the stove much faster.


    And Fox9988, I did not take your posts as highjacking the thread. All is well.
    charly likes this.

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