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Would you school me on wood?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by snow4me, Jan 21, 2009.

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  1. snow4me

    snow4me Member

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    Hey there guys, I am new to burning and know nothing about wood. I was wondering if you could make me a list of the wood I should burn in my Jotul F100, starting from best to worst? My brother-in-law works for the city and I am able to cut wood from the trees they take down. With the small amount I will be burning each year, I can be picky. Thanks!!!

    Daryl

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  2. Mmaul

    Mmaul Minister of Fire

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    Muncie, IN
    Oak
  3. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    hedge apple
  4. FLINT

    FLINT Feeling the Heat

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    Western VA Mtns.
  5. ikessky

    ikessky Minister of Fire

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    If I only had one wood to burn, it would be hard maple. It doesn't take as long as oak to season, gives off good heat, and coals very well.

    I am fortunate that I have a good selection to choose from. Oak, maple, white ash, black ash, birch...... It all burns well, but you have to make sure you season your wood properly no matter what you cut. Even white ash, which is already low in moisture content, should be seasoned for a while before burning.
  6. Duetech

    Duetech Minister of Fire

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    All wood burns best when it is seasoned but not all woods are created equal. Use this link (http://www.chimneysweeponline.com/howood.htm) select, copy and paste to a word file. It's not an exhaustive list but it will give you a good reference point.
  7. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    well seasoned
    seasoned
    seasoned good enough

    not seasoned you don't want at all. :)
  8. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    If it's free and easy, burn everything cuz everything burns.
  9. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    1) free

    2) cheap
  10. snow4me

    snow4me Member

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    Nov 24, 2008
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    Loc:
    S/E Michigan
    Burn it all huh!!! My stove only has a burn time of around six hours and will only be used on the weekends since it's in my little 12X20 snowmobile/hunt cabin. I was just hoping to have her burn through the night as well as possible and spoil her a bit with the good stuff.

    Daryl
  11. karri0n

    karri0n New Member

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    The best wood will be dependent on your area. I'm not sure what grows native there in MI, but the hardest hardwood you can find that is readily available in the area is your best bet.
  12. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    Hey snow4me if you're just starting out why not consider hooking up with a wood burning buddy or neighbor to learn the ropes? Logs staged up the city green yard will almost be impossible for a new guy to ID cause they've limbed ' and chipped the smaller leaf bearing limbs. Otherwise cut what's easiest for you...it's all good if its free.
  13. Pagey

    Pagey Minister of Fire

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    Well, your hardwoods will definitely hold up much better for those longer, overnight burns. They tend to coal much longer, too, so they make morning restarts much easier. Softwoods are great for milder weather and quick, hot restarts. I have some white pine that is great for mild weather, and it lights off almost instantly on a good coal bed. However, if I use it for an overnight burn, I have to do a cold start in the morning. If I bank the fire at night with red or white oak, I have a full bed of coals for the morning restart.

    Whatever you burn, make sure it's nice and dry. Get a cheap moisture meter from Amazon or Harbor Freight if you want to be sure. Split a piece of wood and take a reading from inside the fresh split. Ideally, you'll be at 20% or less.
  14. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    In your area you should be able to find more white ash than you know what to do with. It is all dying. Another one is elm. You'll see them in fence rows or ditch lines with the bark falling off. It takes only a couple minutes to stop and ask a landowner about those dying trees and many will be happy if you take them...so long as you also take care of the brush, which usually only means stack it instead of just leaving it where it was cut. That ash and elm will do all you need and more.
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