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Yet another stove-lighting thread...

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Jimbob, Oct 17, 2007.

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  1. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    My method is a bit different, because I don't use kindling.
    Stove is a P.E. Summit freestanding, but any stove who's firebox is as deep as it is wide should be able to use this method.
    Times may vary, depending on the type of wood, and the amount of chimmney draft. This way of lighting it works for me just about every time.

    First I start with a log.

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  2. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    ...Then another one along the other side.
    Then tear up some cardboard.

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  3. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    Put the cardboard in place, topped up with some newspaper. Then add a couple of peices across the two original logs, forming a bridge...

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  4. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    Add more pieces front to back, notice they are not exactly kindling. Looks like Tamarack and Poplar right now, and maybe a piece of ash. There is a total of 9 pieces in there.
    Light 'er up!

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  5. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    After about 2 minutes, close door this far...

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  6. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    Door is still open after 7 minutes from time stove was first lit. Note the plastic bottle on stove, showing top is still fairly cool.

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  7. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    A couple more minutes have passed, time to latch the door, 9 minutes after being lit.

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  8. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    11 minutes after being lit, pop bottle is no longer sitting on top of stove. Surface-mount pipe thermometer shows 450 F.

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  9. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    Fire has been going for a total of 18 minutes now, time to turn it down...

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  10. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    29 minutes: Pipe temp @ 500F, Stove top thermometer shows 625F.
    36 minutes: Blower control kicks on.
    60 minutes: Pipe temp @ 525F, stove top @ 800F.
    1H 8M Turned draft all the way down.
    1H 20 mins: Pipe temp now @ 465F, top up to 825F.
    1H 30 mins: Pipe temp @ 300F, top temp settles down to 575.
    2H 50 mins: Pipe temp @225F, top @450. Would be time to load 'er up if needed, but not necessary tonight.
  11. Burn-1

    Burn-1 Feeling the Heat

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  12. thephotohound

    thephotohound New Member

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    As clearly evidenced by the number of my posts, I am by far an expert on stove temp. However, is the 825 degree stove top temp just a smidge high? And how about that pipe temp of 525? Maybe it's just me...
  13. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Naaaa, its a SUMMIT. They use those to kick start Nuke plants. :p

    I will admit, I don't like to see ANYTHING over 800 on the stove top, but have got there a couple of times by accident. I usually try to keep 650 or less. Maybe hit 700 plus on startup, then let her settle in.
  14. tutu_sue

    tutu_sue New Member

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    Not just you - I get nervous when the needle creeps a hair above 600F..
  15. fbelec

    fbelec Minister of Fire

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    yep but only when the pipe starts crackling :eek:hh:
  16. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

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    That is about what I was thinking on my first read through... "If I had 7+ splits in my stove at one time, that sucker would hit 800F +" If this works for your situation, then by all means, go for it. I think most will regard the 800F region as 'getting a little hot'. Due to my set-up (a lot of space to heat, but little thermal mass) I have to run my stove at more moderate temps for longer times to get a more even heat.


    Corey
  17. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Sue, I wouldn't get nervous until the stove gets over 750-800. When burning fir we had the F3 regularly up to 700 with no ill effect.
  18. tutu_sue

    tutu_sue New Member

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    Kewl. If I'm ever in an emergency heating situation, I now know I can push her a little bit. Thank you for peace of mind BeGreen. :)
  19. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    I only run the stove pipe @ 625 or so when first lighting the stove, and just after a fresh re-load for 10 or 20 minutes, then I turn it down so the pipe stays just over 500.

    The stove top runs about 800 with the control lever 1" from the lowest setting, measured at the outer end of the lever, turning it right down seems to keep the top @ about 600 or so. I just started with the stove top thermometer, so these temps may vary as we make our way into the heating season. I should also note I keep the thermometer on the hottest part of the top.

    That 3 hr. burn time was just on that first small load of wood.
    When I re-load onto a big bed of coals, I fill the firebox right up and let it burn on high for about 5 munutes, then turn it down. Doing this gets me a burn time closer to what it should be. Most of the wood I burn is fairly soft, so I won't get the LONG burn times you people further east would get.:)

    The main intent of this thread was to illustrate a way to start a fire without kindling or store-bought firestarters, then I got side-tracked.
  20. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    Bumping this for the new members.....:)
  21. madison

    madison Minister of Fire

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    jimbob,

    i searched unsuccessfully, but was curious if you have ever compared temperatures of your stovetop and upper door corner on your freestanding summit. I am curious as a T6 user, and after reading the the summit insert users experiences with various door front temperatures wondered how that compared to the stovetop. Especially this thread: http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/forums/viewthread/5506/ from the past.

    thanks
  22. bsruther

    bsruther Minister of Fire

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    This is basically the method that I use, except I have andirons that take the place of the two NS splits and instead of cardboard, I use stringies that I pull off the splits.
    It works great for me most of the time. If the stove has been cleaned out, I need a little kindling to get it going. Having a little ash in there seems to make a big difference.
  23. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    Madison, I hadn't really checked front corner temps before, But as our Summit works it's way through a load of Poplar right now, the readings I have;
    Stack. 460
    Top 550
    Front. 525

    All temps are in F. Stack temp is a surface reading taken 18" from flue collar.
    Top temp it taken slightly ahead of and to the left of the flue exit.
    Front temp is from upper L.H. corner above door.
  24. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    Now the front corners are down to about 475-480, with the L.H. one being the warmer one.
    Much of the top is around 480 although there is a spot at about 525 deg. F. about 4" diagonally in from the left front corner.
    Stack has settled down to 365 F.
  25. madison

    madison Minister of Fire

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    jimbob,

    Thanks for the effort and info, very interesting, especially the hotspot.... I have been interested in the coorelation of stove top to door temps, as there have been a couple of summit insert temp threads which are door front temp readings, and as a new t6 user, i'm always looking for info on burning the big box PE stoves.

    thanks again.
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