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You will burn more wood if your house is shaded.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by RedRanger, Dec 5, 2007.

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  1. RedRanger

    RedRanger New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2007
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    Loc:
    British Columbia
    I replied to the post about how much wood have you burned so far this season. Well, here it is Dec.5th and I have already gone thru 1and a quarter cords. Insert works like it is supposed to. But we get no sun, while our neighbors are basking in passive solar heat, none here-zilch. Our house sits in the middle of a one and a quarter acre, with 100 year old Douglas Firs and Western Red Cedars surrounding us. We only get the sun in here during May thru August, when we don`t need it.lol I recall going outside middle of Sept and the temp was warmer outside than inside"I`m not kidding". And the big problem that I personally have is that whenever I cut down a tree, the better-half threatens me with horrible consequences. So, long story short, we live in a moderate climate, but probably burn for a longer period than some of you in the colder climates. Guess, it`s all relative though, nice and cool here in the summer-time. Something to think about for those of you maybe involved in building and planning to heat with wood. LEAVE SOME SPACE FOR THE SUN...

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  2. KeithO

    KeithO Minister of Fire

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    Aug 8, 2007
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    Loc:
    Jackson, MI
    It sounds like you should have lots of dead fall to keep you toasty through winter. And if not, a single tree would probably provide all your heating needs for a couple of years. If you need to fell something, pick trees that would open up that southern sky as a priority. The trees to the north and west will provide somewhat of a barrier to the worst winter weather.

    During the 3 years I lived in germany, I was on a north facing slope of a tight valley. I could look out my front windows at the homes on the opposite side of the valley where the residents would be sitting out on the porch in shorts and shirt sleeves where I would have been wearing sweaters for 4-6 weeks already. I swear that winter was 2 months longer on my side of the valley than the opposite side. Since that time, I can assure you that the site location and solar exposure is something that I will not compromise on when I build my next home.
  3. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    That's the reason for planting evergreens to the north and northwest of the house. Southern areas should be shade trees in the summer and then drop their leaves for sunshine to hit in the winter. However, I have yet to see any recent new housing with these characteristis in mind. Seems not many want to work with nature...but some do.
  4. RedRanger

    RedRanger New Member

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    Nov 19, 2007
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    1,428
    Loc:
    British Columbia
    Thanks for the comments Keith: I have done lots of thinning, but even that is a "touchy thing". Have gone so far as to quickly clean up the branches after falling and bucking. and then planting Rhodos almost on top of the felled trees. Sometimes she has discovered what I have done, and sometimes not-it`s hit and miss. :) But both you and I know that a 90ft spindly tree can not compete with a huge tree within 8ft of it. It just grows taller and is an eyesore and eventually will have to yeild to the majestic giants next to it. Isn`t married life wonderful--lol Only saving grace for me is that I`m retired and she is not. So, I do my falliing and bucking when she is at work.heh,heh. In reality though, it really is those wonderful giants that are blocking most of the sunlight, and they were here before us, so not about to cut them down. Kinda crazy I guess, like my gardening, rhodo gardens all thru the woods, and left the huckleberries, and the salmon berries, and oregon grape, for the same reason, they were here first,and deserve to survive. Having said that, if I had my way, I would remove all the trees on the South-West side of this acreage, and plant decorative ones, then,we too could enjoy that passive solar heat. But me thinks, I`m fighting a losing battle in that regard. Pro`s and Con`s, you are right about the windfall, lots of scrap to burn in the fall.
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