adventures in chimney sweeping

beermann

Burning Hunk
Jan 16, 2017
248
canada
So a read somewhere that it's possible to attach about 10lbs to a sweep brush and drop it down the hole. Then just pull it back up and repeat a few times..... So I grabbed a rope and some weights and went to it. After shoving the brush into the hole about one foot......it was stuck. The weights didn't help to pull in down and the angle of the bristles only allowed the brush to go in one direction....it was STUCK.

I ended up heading out to grab some rods, attached them and pushed it all the way through, back and forth a few times and cleaned it good.

Anyone new to chimney sweeping like myself I advise you to just get the rods.
 

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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,408
central pa
So a read somewhere that it's possible to attach about 10lbs to a sweep brush and drop it down the hole. Then just pull it back up and repeat a few times..... So I grabbed a rope and some weights and went to it. After shoving the brush into the hole about one foot......it was stuck. The weights didn't help to pull in down and the angle of the bristles only allowed the brush to go in one direction....it was STUCK.

I ended up heading out to grab some rods, attached them and pushed it all the way through, back and forth a few times and cleaned it good.

Anyone new to chimney sweeping like myself I advise you to just get the rods.
I would be very careful cleaning a lightwall liner like that with a stiff brush. Especially one that fits that tight. The liner is very thin and can easily be damaged. I would recommend a soot eater and cleaning from the bottom with your regency
 

Ludlow

Minister of Fire
Jun 4, 2018
1,062
PA
Drop a rope down, tie brush on and pull it up. Drop rope back down, push brush into pipe, go below and pull it back down.
 

Mike.O

Member
Dec 20, 2017
106
CT
I would be very careful cleaning a lightwall liner like that with a stiff brush. Especially one that fits that tight. The liner is very thin and can easily be damaged. I would recommend a soot eater and cleaning from the bottom with your regency
I didn't know a brush was not good for these liners. His pic looks like the same liner I (and most) have, the T316. Mines from Rockford. Should I switch away from the poly brush?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,408
central pa
I didn't know a brush was not good for these liners. His pic looks like the same liner I (and most) have, the T316. Mines from Rockford. Should I switch away from the poly brush?
I wouldn't use one that is to stiff or to tight. Brushes are fine if they are the right ones. Yes many people have light wall liners like that but there are many other types as well. There is nothing wrong with those they are just very thin
 
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Ctwoodtick

Minister of Fire
Jun 5, 2015
1,060
Southeast CT
I didn't know a brush was not good for these liners. His pic looks like the same liner I (and most) have, the T316. Mines from Rockford. Should I switch away from the poly brush?
Definitely look into the sooteater. It’s inexpensive, easy to use. I know it sounds odd to think that a chimney brush could be bad for a liner but those very stiff poly brushes can be a little bit wider diameter than inside of liner, thus becoming stuck. The sooteater functions like a weed wacker but is gentle on the liner. It comes in a standard size and you can trim the “brush” part of it to meet you liner size.
I wish softer poly brushes were readily available. I did with you did a while back with a previous liner. It was not a fun experience.
 
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Mike.O

Member
Dec 20, 2017
106
CT
I wouldn't use one that is to stiff or to tight. Brushes are fine if they are the right ones. Yes many people have light wall liners like that but there are many other types as well. There is nothing wrong with those they are just very thin
Not to totally take this off topic, but what is a "lightweight liner"? Is it just a general term for all the 316Ti flexible liners? I didn't intend to skimp on anything safety related when I installed my stove setup, but you have me nervous. And really concerned that my poly brush is doing, or has done, damage. I don't recall it being overly tight on either stove setup, but I do have one offset on the downstairs stove that takes a little coaxing to get it through.

This is my liner.

https://www.rockfordchimneysupply.com/chimney-liners/316ti-flexible-chimney-liners/316ti-flexible-chimney-liner-kits

Maybe a soot eater is in my future.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,408
central pa
Not to totally take this off topic, but what is a "lightweight liner"? Is it just a general term for all the 316Ti flexible liners? I didn't intend to skimp on anything safety related when I installed my stove setup, but you have me nervous. And really concerned that my poly brush is doing, or has done, damage. I don't recall it being overly tight on either stove setup, but I do have one offset on the downstairs stove that takes a little coaxing to get it through.

This is my liner.

https://www.rockfordchimneysupply.com/chimney-liners/316ti-flexible-chimney-liners/316ti-flexible-chimney-liner-kits

Maybe a soot eater is in my future.
A lightweight liner refers to the thickness of metal used. They are either .005 or .006. heavy wall liners like we typically use for wood are constructed differently and use .014 or .015. there are also midweight liners that are usually .010. then there is rigid which is thickest. But a pain to install.
 

Mike.O

Member
Dec 20, 2017
106
CT
A lightweight liner refers to the thickness of metal used. They are either .005 or .006. heavy wall liners like we typically use for wood are constructed differently and use .014 or .015. there are also midweight liners that are usually .010. then there is rigid which is thickest. But a pain to install.
Thank you for the info! Wish I knew better when I purchased my liner.
 

HomeinPA

Minister of Fire
Jan 4, 2018
510
Central PA
Not to totally take this off topic, but what is a "lightweight liner"? Is it just a general term for all the 316Ti flexible liners? I didn't intend to skimp on anything safety related when I installed my stove setup, but you have me nervous. And really concerned that my poly brush is doing, or has done, damage. I don't recall it being overly tight on either stove setup, but I do have one offset on the downstairs stove that takes a little coaxing to get it through.

This is my liner.

https://www.rockfordchimneysupply.com/chimney-liners/316ti-flexible-chimney-liners/316ti-flexible-chimney-liner-kits

Maybe a soot eater is in my future.
As long as you use the proper size brush and aren't trying to jam a 6" brush down a 5.5" liner....or an 8" down a 6"...you should be fine with a poly brush. If the liner was crushed somewhere when it was installed that would be a different story though. The stiff poly brush will go, should go, down the liner even with a slight bend to it. They also make a soft bristle poly brush which is what I prefer to use however the sooteater system is also quite convenient and it can keep you off the roof. It sounds like you were using too large of a brush for the liner.

BTW - avoid using a metal straight-wire brush to run up and down a stainless liner.
 
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