Advice on buying and installing a 1997 PE Pacific insert series D

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mojoliveshere

New Member
Sep 16, 2022
22
Victoria BC
Hi all,

I'm new to the forum but not burning for heat. I've search the site and the lighter net but can't find the information I'm looking for on an insert in my area.

The attached stove is for sale close by for $100. I took a look yesterday and it looks to be in pretty excellent shape for its age. I'm fairly confident it hasn't been used for a better part of a decade. I'm hoping to buy it and install in a masonry chimney but I can't find much information about the stove online, probably due to its age. I have a few questions that I hope some of you can assist with.

- do Pacific energy manuals cover a range of years? Would I have confidence in following the specs in the attached guide for a 1997 unit even though it doesn't specify that is what it is for?
- should I be concerned using a stove it hasn't been active for many years?
- any general knowledge to share about Pacific energy stoves from this vintage? From reading here I don't think it has EBT.... Anything else worth noting?
- the blower cord was torn during removal. Is this something that can be replaced or repaired on an insert of this period?
- a question about liner installs.... do chimney liner kits come with couplers or the like for attaching the liner to the stove itself?

I think that's it for now. I appreciate any information or advice you all can offer. I've reached out to Pacific energy but don't expect to hear back until after the weekend. Conveniently, the factory is only about 45 minutes from my home so if need be I'll just run up there and ask in person I guess!

Cheers,
m

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,392
South Puget Sound, WA
One of the nice things about a PE stove is that the design has stayed consistent over many years, so parts, if needed for older stoves are still available. The Pacific Insert became the Super, but inside it's the same 2 cu ft firebox. The blower cord should be easy to replace. There is no EBT on this stove, but it may have the coupled secondary air control that helps extend the burn. Member Dix has been heating with this insert for over a decade.

Not using the stove shouldn't affect it much unless it was in a damp area and rust set in. How does the interior of the insert look? Do you have any pictures of the firebox and baffle? It that area is ok, grab it quickly. This is a great price.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,392
South Puget Sound, WA
Chimney liners need an appliance adapter that couples the liner with a band clamp and fits into the flue collar of the insert. These also come in shallow angles if the liner is not plumb to the flue collar. Note that most liners need to be insulated.

liner appliance adapter straight.png
 

mojoliveshere

New Member
Sep 16, 2022
22
Victoria BC
Chimney liners need an appliance adapter that couples the liner with a band clamp and fits into the flue collar of the insert. These also come in shallow angles if the liner is not plumb to the flue collar. Note that most liners need to be insulated.

View attachment 299090
Many thanks begreen for these comments.

It's great to know that Pacific energy hasn't changed their design much, this gives me confidence with the dimensions and the install process. I think I'll be okay with a standard adapter but I won't know until I get the liner down past the damper.

The inside look to be in pretty good shape. I didn't have time to really look it over too well but I plan to do so before I fully commit (it's as good as mine, though. The seller is demolishing the house and doesn't really care about the stove, only the removal of it).

I'll snap some more pics when I see it next and we'll post them for review. Thanks again for the advice and info!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,392
South Puget Sound, WA
Sounds like a steal of a deal. Grab it quickly. Stoves like this are often the first one to show up gets it.
 
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john26

Minister of Fire
Oct 27, 2008
783
Wildwood MO
I have the Identical stove and absolutely love it. I completely dismantled and cleaned mine even repainted the outside of the firebox. The stove has one lever on the bottom that controls primary air (inlet on front under the door) and a secondary air (inlet at the rear) proportionally. Check the top right comers of the door openings and the air wash plate mine has hairline cracks but doesn't seem to effect performance.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,392
South Puget Sound, WA
I have the Identical stove and absolutely love it. I completely dismantled and cleaned mine even repainted the outside of the firebox. The stove has one lever on the bottom that controls primary air (inlet on front under the door) and a secondary air (inlet at the rear) proportionally. Check the top right comers of the door openings and the air wash plate mine has hairline cracks but doesn't seem to effect performance.
I would drill a small 1/16" hole at the end of the crack to stop its spread. It might also be good to have a welder come and weld it up as a preventative repair.
 

john26

Minister of Fire
Oct 27, 2008
783
Wildwood MO
I will if it gets worse or if I have to pull it out.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,392
South Puget Sound, WA
I'd be proactive about it to keep the issue minor. It could be a PITA if the crack decided to spread in the middle of the heating season.
 

mojoliveshere

New Member
Sep 16, 2022
22
Victoria BC
Hi again,

I finally picked up the stove and got it home for a good inspection. aside from the issues above, the only problem I can see is a bit of surface rust inside the firebox. Nothing feels soft, etc. and I'm confident it's minor. FYI, the pics were taken before a wipe down, so it looks worse than it is. (Funny enough, I noticed today that there is no cap on the chimney and the previous owner didn't recall there being one, so I'm not surprised that moisture got in in over the years of (presumed) inactivity).

I've searched for answers but still have a few questions:

Should I paint the inside of the firebox?

Is there a optimal method of painting the exterior, and can I paint the vent flanges , surround, etc. with the same paint?

I've attached a picture of a piece of iron that was inside the firebox when I got it - is it part of the baffle? baffle protection maybe?

Which reminds me - there was insulation above the baffle which blocked the hole that vented to the liner - is this required, and if so, would ceramic insulation be suitable? I'll likely have extra after wrapping the liner.

I think that's it. Many thanks for the info and advice!

m

PXL_20220926_000229489.jpg PXL_20220926_003228612.jpg PXL_20220926_000243126.jpg
 

mojoliveshere

New Member
Sep 16, 2022
22
Victoria BC
Me again.

I determined that the iron piece is the boost manifold, which appears to lay horizontally across the front of the firebox.

I'm still wondering about the insulation -should it be blocking the exhaust hole? - and whether I can/should use the same paint for the surround, ash lip, etc. that I use on the insert?

Also - PE let me know that they use Stove Bright metallic black. I'm interested in a more 'cast iron' sort of look. Should I repaint with metallic or with Satin?

Thanks, all. This site is a huge resource.

m
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,392
South Puget Sound, WA
I've searched for answers but still have a few questions:

Should I paint the inside of the firebox?

Is there a optimal method of painting the exterior, and can I paint the vent flanges , surround, etc. with the same paint?

I've attached a picture of a piece of iron that was inside the firebox when I got it - is it part of the baffle? baffle protection maybe?

Which reminds me - there was insulation above the baffle which blocked the hole that vented to the liner - is this required, and if so, would ceramic insulation be suitable? I'll likely have extra after wrapping the liner.
I'd use the recommended paint color. No, don't paint the inside of the firebox. It would burn off quickly. Rust is natural result of humidity. Heat accelerates oxidation. This stove may be old enough that the brick retaining baffle rails are steel and not stainless. No big deal, they look in good condition. What does the baffle look like? Do you have the firebrick? This stove takes pumice firebrick if replacements are needed.

Clean the exterior and go over with fine steel wool. Clean well, wipe with a tack rag, then wipe down with alcohol. Paint in light coats at room temp in a very well-ventilated space. The fumes are toxic so wear a mask if ventilation is poor. The paint dries quickly. Plan on 3 light coats for good coverage.

Yes, that is the boost manifold cover. The holes face the interior of the firebox.

The insulation blanket lies on top of the baffle. There should be a 1-2" gap above it and the roof of the firebox.

Remember to put a gasket around the secondary tube before putting it back in.
 

mojoliveshere

New Member
Sep 16, 2022
22
Victoria BC
I'd use the recommended paint color. No, don't paint the inside of the firebox. It would burn off quickly. Rust is natural result of humidity. Heat accelerates oxidation. This stove may be old enough that the brick retaining baffle rails are steel and not stainless. No big deal, they look in good condition. What does the baffle look like? Do you have the firebrick? This stove takes pumice firebrick if replacements are needed.

Clean the exterior and go over with fine steel wool. Clean well, wipe with a tack rag, then wipe down with alcohol. Paint in light coats at room temp in a very well-ventilated space. The fumes are toxic so wear a mask if ventilation is poor. The paint dries quickly. Plan on 3 light coats for good coverage.

Yes, that is the boost manifold cover. The holes face the interior of the firebox.

The insulation blanket lies on top of the baffle. There should be a 1-2" gap above it and the roof of the firebox.

Remember to put a gasket around the secondary tube before putting it back in.
Thanks begreen for answering each question. I'd be lost without this site as even PE can't give me a straight answer on some of the questions I have about this older insert.

And thanks for the tip about the gasket! I didn't see on when I cleaned the stove and would have installed it without a replacement.

Would the firebox in this 1997 stove be the same as other that have ash clean out on the bottom? I ask because there is a square section on the firebox floor that looks like it would pop out/ cut out right where the ash port is on other models such as the Alderlea.

Cheers,
m
 

john26

Minister of Fire
Oct 27, 2008
783
Wildwood MO
My series D has a square piece of steel welded on the floor I suspect the floors where maybe stamped out on a punch press then models with out ash clean out had a plate welded on?
 

mojoliveshere

New Member
Sep 16, 2022
22
Victoria BC
My series D has a square piece of steel welded on the floor I suspect the floors where maybe stamped out on a punch press then models with out ash clean out had a plate welded on?
That's probably it. Mine looks the same - as if the square was filled and welded in place.

Thanks for the feedback!
 

JNF

New Member
Oct 30, 2022
7
Oregon
Sounds like a steal of a deal. Grab it quickly. Stoves like this are often the first one to show up gets it.
Hello!
You look like the OG of inserts, and I'm hoping you can help. We have a Pacific Energy Series D. We need a new flame shield. We've got these numbers.
Original Part #WINS.513 but we can't find the original part dimensions anywhere online or in our manual. My husband measured the DEFORMED old part at 11.125" x 12.25".

Then he found SKU 80000397 (summ 31155) with 11.75" x 16" dimensions
Hence, I hope you have the answer...
Do you know exactly which Flame Shield part # to order and where to buy it? Or the material that needs to be used and maybe a local metal expert/welder is going to be able to make it for us?
Thank you!
 

john26

Minister of Fire
Oct 27, 2008
783
Wildwood MO

FireUpTheChainsaw

New Member
Oct 17, 2022
21
Trumbull, CT, USA
One of the nice things about a PE stove is that the design has stayed consistent over many years, so parts, if needed for older stoves are still available. The Pacific Insert became the Super, but inside it's the same 2 cu ft firebox. The blower cord should be easy to replace. There is no EBT on this stove, but it may have the coupled secondary air control that helps extend the burn. Member Dix has been heating with this insert for over a decade.

Not using the stove shouldn't affect it much unless it was in a damp area and rust set in. How does the interior of the insert look? Do you have any pictures of the firebox and baffle? It that area is ok, grab it quickly. This is a great price.
Any idea how managed this feat? The new EPA regulations are from 2020, but it sounds like they were mostly there with the old designs.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,392
South Puget Sound, WA
Any idea how managed this feat? The new EPA regulations are from 2020, but it sounds like they were mostly there with the old designs.
What feat, meeting the new regs? It looks like they just tweaked the existing baffle, adding more secondary air holes in a wider pattern. Not sure what else. Maybe more insulation in the baffle?
 
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