Any problem with building a vertical wood stove ?

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Poodleheadmikey

New Member
Feb 20, 2011
68
Southern New Jersey
Whenever people build cylindrical stoves they always seem to be horizontal. Is there any good reason for this? I would like to build one from a water heater but leave it standing upright so as to have a smaller footprint. Does anyone know of a reason not to use the heater upright?

PHM
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Backwoods Savage

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2007
27,812
Michigan
Most of the old stoves were vertical. As a young lad, our house was heated by two stoves and both were vertical. We didn't seem to have any problems.
 

jeff_t

Minister of Fire
Sep 14, 2008
4,205
SE MI
Seen someEuropean stoves like that as well. They're usually not very big though. I would think a big load might be difficult to control? Maybe?
 

Backwoods Savage

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2007
27,812
Michigan
Jeff, we had no control problems with the old stoves, but they definitely had to have a pipe damper.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,123
South Puget Sound, WA
Godin still makes vertical stoves in the classic and in contemporary style. Many new European stoves are also essentially vertical burners. Like this Rais for example.
 

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Stephen in SoKY

Feeling the Heat
Nov 20, 2008
333
Southern Kentucky
I wonder how close to size a Warm Morning would be? A 523 is a pretty serious (100 lb) heater. Cast iron top and base might be a reasonably close fit to a water heater cylinder.
 

firefighterjake

Minister of Fire
Jul 22, 2008
19,371
Unity/Bangor, Maine
Not sure if you are serious . . . or are just thinking about building one for fun . . . but like the other poster I would be a bit concerned with the gauge of the hot water tank, insurance, etc.
 

raybonz

Minister of Fire
Feb 5, 2008
6,208
Carver, MA.
Backwoods Savage said:
Most of the old stoves were vertical. As a young lad, our house was heated by two stoves and both were vertical. We didn't seem to have any problems.
Interesting! Did you sit on a milk crate while loading it? Starting to see a pattern here!

:cheese:

Ray
 

Poodleheadmikey

New Member
Feb 20, 2011
68
Southern New Jersey
Yes; I am serious. I already have the water heater. Although I am now thinking about using a smaller water heater as the steel-tubes wood stove I built last year puts out Way too much heat.

I will check when cutting but I picture water heaters to be about 10 gauge steel. Which is much heavier than the 55 gallon drums people (not me <g>) build those "barrel stoves" out of.

PHM
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firefighterjake said:
Not sure if you are serious . . . or are just thinking about building one for fun . . . but like the other poster I would be a bit concerned with the gauge of the hot water tank, insurance, etc.
 
P

Pallet Pete

Guest
We had a vertical boiler growing up I would say it almost burned as good if not better than horizantal stoves.

Pete
 

sebring

Member
Oct 3, 2011
148
PA
I will buy the one you have that puts off too much heat. Would you be willing to trade for an old pressure tank.
 

Poodleheadmikey

New Member
Feb 20, 2011
68
Southern New Jersey
All my life-safety considerations are serious.

The vertical wood stove would be built and installed in my cellar.

Water heaters aren't galvanized and I wouldn't use one if they were as welding galvanized puts out some kind of nasty fumes.

I am stuck with a 6" flue pipe as that is the size chimney liner I just installed. Or smaller I guess.

I had started out with the idea of using an electric water heater tank but just now I'm thinking that a gas unit would be better as I could re-use the central flue pipe as a top-down air inlet pipe. To supply combustion air to the bottom of the fire box.

Although . . . I do want to use an 'inserted' flue pipe to create a heat-chamber at the top of the stove body - above the actual exit point of the wood smoke. So maybe I could re-use the existing central flue pipe of a gas water heater for both: leave a 12" stub sticking down at the top and also leave a 2" stub sticking up at the bottom. And then just take the combustion air in at the center bottom.

Your construction opinions?

PHM
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greenteam said:
I think I would make some serious life safety considerations. What gage metal is the tank? is it galvanized metal, if unlisted unlabeled, should you need to file an insurance claim
would it be covered? Engineering would govern what size chimney is required? Is it going in your home or an out building like a shed?. Lots of things to consider but most important your own and your family's life and safety
 

Poodleheadmikey

New Member
Feb 20, 2011
68
Southern New Jersey
Why don't you come by and see it in action if you're not too far away? I'm about 20 minutes southeast of Philadelphia - in NJ.

Getting it out of my cellar might be a trick though. <g> Although, that being said; if anyone can get it out of there - it's me. <g>

I would sell it for materials cost.

poodleheadmikey @ yahoo.com (just take out the two spaces <g>)
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sebring said:
I will buy the one you have that puts off too much heat. Would you be willing to trade for an old pressure tank.
 

Poodleheadmikey

New Member
Feb 20, 2011
68
Southern New Jersey
Something like that but taller - about five feet tall. But with a better loading door. And with a grate and an ash door under the loading door. And now with air intake centered in the bottom. And my insert-flue pipe idea in the top.

But vertically the same. <g>

PHM
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with
Pete1983 said:
Hot water heater wood stove
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yc6gNSkLsJ8&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Is that what you are thinking about making?
Pete
 

Backwoods Savage

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2007
27,812
Michigan
raybonz said:
Backwoods Savage said:
Most of the old stoves were vertical. As a young lad, our house was heated by two stoves and both were vertical. We didn't seem to have any problems.
Interesting! Did you sit on a milk crate while loading it? Starting to see a pattern here!

:cheese:

Ray
I would have Ray except they were top loaders and they were quite tall too. Hum. Maybe I could have tried a bar stool but then, we didn't have one then.
 

raybonz

Minister of Fire
Feb 5, 2008
6,208
Carver, MA.
Backwoods Savage said:
raybonz said:
Backwoods Savage said:
Most of the old stoves were vertical. As a young lad, our house was heated by two stoves and both were vertical. We didn't seem to have any problems.
Interesting! Did you sit on a milk crate while loading it? Starting to see a pattern here!

:cheese:

Ray
I would have Ray except they were top loaders and they were quite tall too. Hum. Maybe I could have tried a bar stool but then, we didn't have one then.
LOL you always have comeback! But aside from that yes they were top loaders.. Not sure I would like a top loading stove as it seems easier to get burnt loading it..

Ray
 
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