BK Princess OAK

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DonTee

Minister of Fire
Dec 1, 2021
656
Upstate NY
I hear ya. I gotta talk my wife into double wall and why we need it. She still doesn’t understand why we needed a new woodstove when the other one still worked. Even though she wasn’t the one getting up in the middle of the night to reload it in the dead of winter. Lol.

As far as clearances right now, I have very close to 18” from the edge of the stove pipe to the drywall. The vertical run. I’ll measure it again when I get home. Even if I switch to double wall pipe the stove is staying where it is.

I know for the most part the pipe clearance is only really an issue in the event of a chimney fire or something similar. The pipe shouldn’t get that hot during normal operation. But it’s still a good reason to have the needed clearance.

A couple winters ago my uncle had a chimney fire. He said he was worried about the stove pipe catching the wall above the stove on fire because the pipe was glowing.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
6,202
Long Island NY
The pipe will get hot during normal BK operation, as it involves a charring phase where you're really burning hard. The flue probe could read up to 900 F then.

Also if you run at higher outputs when it's COLD, it'll be 500 or more.

So single wall can get hot also with a BK.

When you run low (black box mode), it is not very hot (259-300 max, I'd say).
 
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Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
17,573
Philadelphia
FWIW, if clearances are met and things are otherwise ideal, you CAN run a BK on single wall. I have about 6 feet of single wall on one of my Ashfords. Not preferred, and it may limit absolute bottom end (if going for 30+ hour burns is even your thing), but it can work.

Of course, you gotta make sure you're meeting minimum clearances, first.
 
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DonTee

Minister of Fire
Dec 1, 2021
656
Upstate NY
Looks like I have 15” on one wall and 17” on the other. That’s to the drywall behind the rock board. I still have the rock board with the 1” air gap. I believe you can reduce clearances wish that setup. I had the numbers on that at one point. I need to dig that up again.

I am curious to see how hot the stove pipe gets. I should’ve measured it last winter. The stove pipe itself is in almost the exact same spot. Since the flue collar is more towards the middle of the stove on the BK, and was hanging off the back of my VC stove.

Anyways, I should’ve measured the pipe temp last winter when I was running 650 degrees stove top temp in the middle of winter. I bet it was hot then. But the wall wasn’t super hot.

I’ll move the double wall stove pipe up my list towards the top regardless.
 
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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
6,202
Long Island NY
I don't know for sure that the 1" air gap allows to reduce clearance of a pipe? I know it can reduce clearances of a UL-listed stove IF the manual says so. But for pipe I'm not certain. @bholler or others will correct me soon enough :p

I would indeed replace the stove pipe as soon as you are able to. Better safe than sorry.
 

DonTee

Minister of Fire
Dec 1, 2021
656
Upstate NY
Yeah I’m not sure either. I did a bunch of research for the stove last year, but it was a different stove. And I don’t remember what it said about the stove pipe. I know I saved it somewhere.... :)

If I have to move this stove out 3” until I get different pipe then that’s what I’ll do.
 

DonTee

Minister of Fire
Dec 1, 2021
656
Upstate NY
Also a question about the Duravent DVL pipe. My vertical piece is 27” long, and the shortest telescoping piece I see is 29-46”. So what do I do about that? From what I understand you can’t cut this pipe
 

Ashful

Minister of Fire
Mar 7, 2012
17,573
Philadelphia
The insurance adjuster won't care how hot you thought the stovepipe gets, when they're filling out the claim paperwork after a fire.

18 inches is 18 inches, not much up for debate, if you care about receiving the coverage for which you are paying.
 

DonTee

Minister of Fire
Dec 1, 2021
656
Upstate NY
That’s why I come on this forum and ask you guys lots of questions ;)

Maybe bholler can clarify if the pipe clearances can also be reduced by using the rock board and air gap. Or I’ll move the stove out 3”. Or I’ll just get the double wall pipe.
I haven’t had a fire in it yet, so there’s still time to make changes.
 

DonTee

Minister of Fire
Dec 1, 2021
656
Upstate NY
From what I just read I can use a heat shield on the stove pipe to reduce clearance from 18” to 6”. The heat shields shown are a sheet metal piece that wraps around the pipe. Looks like a 1” air gap from the pipe. So I’m wondering if the rock board with air gap counts as a heat shield.

Like this

 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
Yeah I’m not sure either. I did a bunch of research for the stove last year, but it was a different stove. And I don’t remember what it said about the stove pipe. I know I saved it somewhere.... :)

If I have to move this stove out 3” until I get different pipe then that’s what I’ll do.
It is NFPA 2.11 that cites reduction in appliance clearances. However, we never tested for any reduction others than those in the manual.
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
That’s why I come on this forum and ask you guys lots of questions ;)

Maybe bholler can clarify if the pipe clearances can also be reduced by using the rock board and air gap. Or I’ll move the stove out 3”. Or I’ll just get the double wall pipe.
I haven’t had a fire in it yet, so there’s still time to make changes.
Try not to add any offsets more than you have too. Additional class A to make up for elbows is far more costly than DVL...
 

DonTee

Minister of Fire
Dec 1, 2021
656
Upstate NY
I want to use double wall. I have always intended to use double wall stove pipe with this new stove. I still have to figure out what pieces and adaptors I need to connect the double wall stove pipe to my stove/chimney.
It appears as though i will need a couple adjustable pieces, an adaptor for the stove, and an adaptor for the chimney.
The telescoping piece they sell for the vertical run is too long for my stove.
 

DonTee

Minister of Fire
Dec 1, 2021
656
Upstate NY
I got my Auber temp probe. I was wondering about how close I can route it to the stove and stove pipe. I’d like to tuck it in between the fan and the stove body.

The wiring is alumel and chromel, in a braided sleeve. I’m familiar with this type of wiring as used on jet engines (for EGT etc). But I didn’t remember the heat tolerance of this wire.

I’d like to tuck it as close to the stove as possible. I’ve already been warned by the wife that she doesn’t want to see any wires. Lol. Obviously the probe is installed on the back side of the stove pipe.

First pic shows how it is now. Second pic is proposed routing. It’s probably too close to the flue collar. Third pic shows alternate routing. Wire tie outside shielding.

B39DD3FA-3894-4890-889F-DB5CA09FE4D4.jpeg B0FD0FED-7E63-4AC3-AB7B-1B87CD5395E9.jpeg EE602D57-0E46-453D-A5D2-24D82CDD88F4.jpeg
 

DonTee

Minister of Fire
Dec 1, 2021
656
Upstate NY
My Auber alarm was set at 480 degrees from the factory. Kind of surprised me when it went off. Haha.

I think I set it to 1000 degrees now. I’ll have to read the manual again and see if I got it right.