Blaze king new install king model

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Newbieblazeking

New Member
Nov 23, 2021
3
Kentucky
New to the the site have enjoyed reading everyone’s posts. I have ordered a Blaze King king 40 model. Is it acceptable to have 8” double wall from top of stove to celling ~65” then reduced to triple wall 6”for another ~14f?. This is my current set up with a older Appalachian stove. If left this was what would it hurt if anything ? Attached pictures of current set up. Thanks for everyone help.

E6D3F232-390F-4344-8BF6-70CF50DC29D6.jpeg FE0E3A1B-AD53-48D1-807E-C4645B672B5F.jpeg
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
6,282
07462
8" all the way is the manufacturer recommendation due to the 4.35cu ft fire box, in order to run the stove correctly you need to get the wood load to run on high setting so it all can catch (plus run on high weekly to keep the creosote that develops inside the firebox in-check) 6" flue pipe doesn't allow the air volume to allow the stove to run the way it was designed to run, especially in a warmer climate like 30's, 40's and 50's.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
2,860
Long Island NY
Yes, in Kentucky you'll likely run low quite a lot. But that needs a real good run on high before you dial down. And for that you need the flow of an 8" pipe.

Note this stove does best loading it full, stuffing it, and then setting to the output you need and forgetting it until the next reload (which could be two days from then).

How is your wood? It needs *dry* wood. Less than 20 pct ?/moisture content. Do you have a moisture meter? The stove will behave differently than your older stove, and to not be disappointed, it is important to do things right (chimney, wood moisture).
 

Newbieblazeking

New Member
Nov 23, 2021
3
Kentucky
Yes, in Kentucky you'll likely run low quite a lot. But that needs a real good run on high before you dial down. And for that you need the flow of an 8" pipe.

Note this stove does best loading it full, stuffing it, and then setting to the output you need and forgetting it until the next reload (which could be two days from then).

How is your wood? It needs *dry* wood. Less than 20 pct ?/moisture content. Do you have a moisture meter? The stove will behave differently than your older stove, and to not be disappointed, it is important to do things right (chimney, wood moisture).
I have mainly ash and white oak split and stacked in the dry. When I split it 3-6 months back my meter was trading 25-20 % so will keep a eye on that. How long do I need to burn on high like 12 hours weekly ?
 

ratsrepus

Minister of Fire
Jan 5, 2018
673
Howell, Mi
they said this wont work either Kenny

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brenndatomu

Minister of Fire
Aug 21, 2013
6,751
NE Ohio
8” double wall from top of stove to celling ~65” then reduced to triple wall 6”for another ~14f?
The good thing is that the OD of that 6" triple wall should be the same as 8" doublewall insulated, which I'd think would be much preferred, on a cat stove especially.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
2,860
Long Island NY
I have mainly ash and white oak split and stacked in the dry. When I split it 3-6 months back my meter was trading 25-20 % so will keep a eye on that. How long do I need to burn on high like 12 hours weekly ?

Ash may be good. Oak I'm not sure. Depends... :)

I don't think there is a real "need" to burn high - other than the half hour after reloading to bake the wood. I didn't do it more than that. Except at the end of the season I ran a full load high. This removes a lot off the build up (creosote) in the firebox or makes it brittle enough to be able to brush it out.

If you want a clean window all the time (even if you won't see flames all the time, because running low), then I suggest to run high after each reload until the window is to your satisfaction.

If you want to keep the inside clean, you may want to do more. Once every couple of weeks? But even that depends on how much build up you have i.e.wood type, moisture, Tstat setting, etc.

I wouldn't worry about it.
 
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kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
6,282
07462
they said this wont work either Kenny
Eventually it will fail, or cost the consumer unsuspected potential of what a proper setup can do, imagine owning a stove like that, hearing about long burn times but only being able to dial it down 1 click below full blast because the draft gets so weak that the stove keeps stalling, or clogging up the flue? Its kind of like owning a sports car, only putting in cheap gas and not going above 25mph because your afraid of leaving your gated community. You can say you own one, but do you really use it to its potential or can you actually brag about how well it runs when you just running it barebones? Or maybe your just looking for a rise out of me lol.
 
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ratsrepus

Minister of Fire
Jan 5, 2018
673
Howell, Mi
Eventually it will fail, or cost the consumer unsuspected potential of what a proper setup can do, imagine owning a stove like that, hearing about long burn times but only being able to dial it down 1 click below full blast because the draft gets so weak that the stove keeps stalling, or clogging up the flue? Its kind of like owning a sports car, only putting in cheap gas and not going above 25mph because your afraid of leaving your gated community. You can say you own one, but do you really use it to its potential or can you actually brag about how well it runs when you just running it barebones? Or maybe your just looking for a rise out of me lol.
roger on the last sentence
 

BKVP

Minister of Fire
It appears your installation is straight up and out. While others pointed out need for 8" system for performance reasons (and they are correct), spillage will be a concern on 6".

Each time you open the door to load or reload, you want to avoid smoke spilling back into the room. Smoke in your home isn't diluted as it is outdoors. It becomes a health hazard..

Folks from time to time have installed our products other than as suggested in the manual. A few suggest, "I've been burning wood before you were born. A little smoke ain't going to kill ya." We seldom hear from them again......
 

brenndatomu

Minister of Fire
Aug 21, 2013
6,751
NE Ohio

BKVP

Minister of Fire
Nomenclature is a pain in the arse!

Double wall is usually used in in conjunction with black pipe. Black single wall, Black double wall are used inside.

Class A pipe is chimney pipe (two layers of metal pipe) Class A is either "pack pipe" meaning inside pipe followed by insulation (pressed in under very high pressure) and an outer layer of pipe. You can confirm with @bholler, but I think this design has the smallest OD measurement.

Class A pipe can also be air cooled (triple wall). This pipe has three layers of metal, inner pipe, blanket of insulation, another metal pipe followed by an air gap followed by the third, outer most part of the pipe. Again, confirm with someone like @bholler, but I think this is the largest OD measurement.

When I installed my first King (before I worked here) I used the air cooled pipe. It was the most affordable. When I installed a King 1102, I switched to pack pipe. What a positive difference. The reason it made such a difference in my application is that most of my 15' of system is exterior. I did not need air cooled pipe! If OD measurements are not an issue and you can confine the vast majority of the installation within the confines of the home, air cooled may work fine....but I think pack pipe will still out perform!
 
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