Cement Board

mass_burner Posted By mass_burner, Jun 28, 2018 at 10:06 AM

  1. mass_burner

    mass_burner
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    Thinking of cement board as siding option. Any experience out there? Durability, especially to sun, paint adhesion, installation?

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk
     
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  2. peakbagger

    peakbagger
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    I will be interested to see the replies. I would like to swap out my unpainted cedar on the sun exposure sides as the nail pops are real annoying. Also like the fire resistance.

    I have seen a few local government buildings sided with Hardy Plank that are looking great at close to 20 years. The local environment is pretty extreme (from 95 F in the summer to -30 F in the winter with snow and wind. The complaints I here is that Hardy Plank has all sorts of rules and requirements to keep their warranty in effect and typical contractors skip some and hope they are retired before any warranty issues arise. Breakage can be a issue for contractors used to wood or clapboard. Its heavy and they end up going slower. I think ever plank needs to be painted both sides and every field cut sealed. Not sure if a DIYer has any hope of warranty.

    Note that there are new OSHA standards for dust exposure that many small contractors are currently ignoring, I expect any cement board probably will need compliance which means dust collection on the saws and possibly respirators for the workers unless there is pulmonary testing to prove the dust exposure over 8 hours is below the limit.
     
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  3. begreen

    begreen
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    Never done that but it should be durable. Getting the seams sealed could be an issue and potential leak area. I think using cement planks (hardiplanks) is a better option as they are tapered to allow for overlap and water shedding.
     
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  4. blades

    blades
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    revisiting what used to be pretty normal prior to the 60's
     
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  5. begreen

    begreen
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    Do you mean asbestos cement tiles? You still see them on some old places around here.
     
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  6. peakbagger

    peakbagger
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    The asbestos got swapped to some other fiber abut 25 years ago. The common name was "Transite" Legally getting rid of Asbestos cement siding is expensive. In theory the homeowner can DIY but to transport it requires a special license is and it has to be disposed of in specially permitted landfill usually for a premium. Its a big surprise for folks who are starting out flipping homes and get burned by buying a house with asbestos cement siding.

    Supposedly EPA is going to back off on the regs for this type of "encapsulated" Asbestos.
     
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  7. My_3_Girls

    My_3_Girls
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    Cement siding:
    Not tapered, but still lays/laps just fine. Most installers like to use 5/4 boards for the trim, as it sits a little bigger than regular cedar bevel. Cement should not be painted all sides, just the face, edges and ends - not the back. It needs to breathe a little, and the back being bare helps. Also, if you don't buy it prefinished, you're crazy! Pick a color, swipe the cuts with touch up, install, hose it down, and watch it sit there for 20+ years.
     
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  8. sportbikerider78

    sportbikerider78
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    I think different forms of concrete make a great deal of sense. Looks good. Wears tough. I wish there were more homes made entirely from block or poured. I think with the right finish, they look awesome. Very commonplace in Europe.
     
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  9. bholler

    bholler
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    The problem with block houses is that you then have to stud out inside for electrical and insulation. Icf construction is better in many ways but elecrical can still be a pain.
     
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  10. bholler

    bholler
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    Those osha requirements were dropped. Unfortunatly they waited till after tool manufacturers developed products to be compliant and many of us contractors invested in the required equipment.
     
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  11. sportbikerider78

    sportbikerider78
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    I am pretty sure that the block they use in Europe has channels built into it. Don't quote me on that, but the places they use for outlets, switches and other controls, look very uniform.
     
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  12. bholler

    bholler
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    It may i dont know. But you still have to insulate.
     
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  13. Jan Pijpelink

    Jan Pijpelink
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    That is absolutely correct. Most new houses in Europe (since the 80's) are built from pre-frab concrete indoor walls and floors/ceilings and brick outside. All plumbing and electrical is pre-molded.
     
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