Cooking On Your Stove

wooduser Posted By wooduser, Dec 9, 2018 at 9:36 PM

  1. wooduser

    wooduser
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    So.... who cooks on their stove, and what do you cook and how?
     
  2. ChevWood15

    ChevWood15
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    Apr 27, 2018
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    We have an insert so we cant cook on it. Wood fired pizza IN it is the best!! d628dea0c98ed357bbb7452f1c1287cd.jpg
     
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  3. wooduser

    wooduser
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    That looks very cheerful, inviting and fun! I have given some passing thought to cooking inside my stove, but never tried it. Your picture provides some ideas on how to do that.

    Can you give me the make and model of your insert so I can get the size of your firebox to go along with the picture?

    Is that a cast iron frying pan? I don't see a handle and I can't tell for sure.

    Looks like you are a Chicago style deep dish pizza guy! (Oh dear, there I go getting into politics.....)
     
  4. MAD MARK

    MAD MARK
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    Deer chunks. Late night 2am snack.
    20181121_021516.jpg
     
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  5. MAD MARK

    MAD MARK
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  6. ChevWood15

    ChevWood15
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    My insert is the Enviro Boston 1700. Yes I use a 12 inch cast iron pan. I put it on some fire bricks to keep the bottom from getting too hot and burning.
    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
     
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  7. St. Coemgen

    St. Coemgen
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    Feb 4, 2016
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    We bought one of our stoves (the La Nordica) because it has an oven -- our only oven. We cook everything in there as one would in any other oven. Pizza, bread, muffins, casserole, lasagna, etc. etc. etc.

    img_1598277881.jpg img_1598277879.jpg

    Video of baking in our wood stove (will skip to starting with the baking in the stove, since this is a wood heat forum, not a cooking forum)



    Of course, we can then only oven cook in the fall, winter and early spring. In the summer, oven like cooking then goes outside (e.g. barbecue) .
     
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  8. wooduser

    wooduser
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    I thought that was a good idea. I have some left over firebrick --- I'll have to give that a try!
     
  9. wooduser

    wooduser
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    Wow, that's dedication!

    I imagine that the heat produced by the wood fire tends to vary quite a bit ----if that's true, how do you maintain a relatively constant temperature for baking?

    I'm thinking about looking for a metal box I can put on top of my wood stove to use as an oven once in a while ----something with which to experiment. I'd have to just leave an oven thermometer in it for a while to understand what kind of temperatures are available and how reliable they can be maintained.

    At present, I use a Dutch oven to warm food up, and sometimes to do some actual cooking,. With skillets I can do some sooking and with a saucepan I heat pretty much all the water I need during the heating season ----using the sun and plastic bottles for hot water during the summer.
     
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  10. St. Coemgen

    St. Coemgen
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    Actually, it is not difficult to keep a constant oven temperature. This stove was designed for cooking so keeps heat in the cooking oven rather well for "normal baking times". That is, it will not be *exactly* 400°F for 30 minutes, but close enough to cook, properly, within 30 minutes-ish. One must pay a bit more attention of course. But that is part of the fun, being more "hands on" and not so mindless.

    For example, you can see from the video I posted above, at min 5:05 the internal temp is about 220°C (this is an Italian Stove so temps are in Celsius, but that is about 430°F). And 40 minutes later, at min 5:30 (hard to see the temp gauge), but the oven is still at about 220°C.

    Yes, there is a bit of learning curve for sure to keep consistent heat longer. I can, with firebox and air flow manipulation, keep a really consistent heat in the oven for hours. But it takes practice.

    As for dutch ovens, I have never tried them. But a friend of mine swears by them as ideal for cooking. So definitely an option (but also, of course, has a learning curve). :cool:
     
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  11. MDWOOD

    MDWOOD
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    Nov 11, 2013
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    I did a big pot of homemade vegetable beef soup

    All homegrown.
     
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  12. Sawset

    Sawset
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    Feb 14, 2015
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    My grandmother always said baking never turned out as well on the new stove. That was after spending a lifetime with a wood stove/oven. Her learning curve was on the new electric.
     
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