Creosote build up?

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velocity1

New Member
Dec 5, 2021
47
Connecticut
Hi All,
May be a silly question but where does creosote generally build up along your piping? For my set up I have 2 and a half feet of stove pipe going straight up off the top of my stove to a 90 degree elbow. Then there is a run of 2 feet of class a pipe going into a tee connection for my liner which is housed in an exterior chimney, chimney height around 15/16 feet high. Not knowing a lot on the subject my assumption is the first few feet of piping coming off the stove is generally where the creosote build up would be the most, is that correct? I have only been burning so far for about 2 weeks and the pic was from today putting my phone in the stove pointing up the 2 and a half feet of run of stove pipe going to the 90 degree elbow. It seems like once it exists at the elbow there is not much build up at all but for the 2 and a half feet below of stove pipe does that look normal for such a short time burning? I had mentioned in another post i have a mixed bag of wood, some wet some not so wet (around 20% and some more north of that). Thanks

1.jpg
 

gthomas785

Minister of Fire
Feb 8, 2020
659
Central MA
It builds up in the coldest part which is usually at the top of the chimney.
 

velocity1

New Member
Dec 5, 2021
47
Connecticut
Ah ok so i assumed 100% wrong lol. So the build up in the pic what is that considered, just some ash? Thanks
 

gthomas785

Minister of Fire
Feb 8, 2020
659
Central MA
I would call it soot. Basically ash and a little bit of creosote mixed in. That kind is pretty easy to clean out.

Pure ash would be grey or brown, and does not contain any carbon just the inorganic minerals left over from burning the wood. If it's black then you know it's got some level of carbon content.
 
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velocity1

New Member
Dec 5, 2021
47
Connecticut
I would call it soot. Basically ash and a little bit of creosote mixed in. That kind is pretty easy to clean out.

Pure ash would be grey or brown, and does not contain any carbon just the inorganic minerals left over from burning the wood. If it's black then you know it's got some level of carbon content.
Great thanks!