Deck "stain"

  • Active since 1995, Hearth.com is THE place on the internet for free information and advice about wood stoves, pellet stoves and other energy saving equipment.

    We strive to provide opinions, articles, discussions and history related to Hearth Products and in a more general sense, energy issues.

    We promote the EFFICIENT, RESPONSIBLE, CLEAN and SAFE use of all fuels, whether renewable or fossil.

hockeypuck

Feeling the Heat
Hearth Supporter
Sep 6, 2009
427
south central NH
I have a 15 year old PT deck. I put the crapy Olympic cedar colored deck stain on it about 8 years ago. Looks good for a minute. What would be your recommendations for a longer lasting, but does not have to look fantastic from day one? I am thinking about a Cabots solid stain called Deck Correct. Rustoleum has RockSolid product that has varying thickness. Has anyone used one of these products?
 
I had always used an opaque stain on my outdoor wood stuff. Last couple years I’ve had to replace a few boards. It might have been the quality of the wood, it’s been outside since 2011, but the stain didn’t protect it as well as I thought it would. I decided to try topcoating with an exterior latex, hoping that it’ll shed all water and dry from the bottom. I don’t have any long term data on it. I’m just a little disappointed in the stain I’d used.
 
  • Like
Reactions: hockeypuck
I can’t argue with that thought. I had polyurethane paint on my cabin floor and that lasted a good while, but couldn’t find it last time I needed floor paint. I used a specific deck paint for that, but it’s not exposed to weather and I don’t have long term numbers for that either.
 
I have used Thompson Water seal and stain every 4 years
My Cedar deck is 30 years old and is still like new. A little
work every 4 years has kept it that way
 
There is absolutely nothing like Swedish natural linseed oil paint. It is made from natural linseed oil and natural earth pigments. It does not form a film like chemical paints, but it forms a breathable coating that is permanent, breathable, and will last up to 50 years.

I coated my deck years ago and it looks like it will still be there when my grandchildren inherit this place.

Do spend some time looking through the articles on this web site. It will change your painting life.

https://www.solventfreepaint.com/index.htm
 
There is absolutely nothing like Swedish natural linseed oil paint. It is made from natural linseed oil and natural earth pigments. It does not form a film like chemical paints, but it forms a breathable coating that is permanent, breathable, and will last up to 50 years.

I coated my deck years ago and it looks like it will still be there when my grandchildren inherit this place.

Do spend some time looking through the articles on this web site. It will change your painting life.

https://www.solventfreepaint.com/index.htm

I put up a new back porch/stairs last fall so will need to coat the lumber at some point (only the framing, the deck boards are Trex). I'll have to look into this stuff.
 
may not work so well for a deck but all my wood edging for my sidewalk i used some used motor oil and covered them all with that. Once it soaked in it actually looked like i stained them, 3 years later they still look like the day i installed them with no signs of rot.. Learned this trick from a old logger who used to do fences this way.. Not overly environmentally friendly but better that replacing rotten wood every 3-4 years
 
For the first few years, I used Thompsons on my PT deck. I was lucky if it made it a year. Spent a little more and used Sherwin Williams the last time. It is still good going on 3 summers now. May have to redo the surface next summer but everything else looks new.
 
I refinished the deck at my old house and used Armstrong Clark based on this website. Great stuff. Coverage was amazing and it held up awesome. Prep is the key though. You can use the best stuff but if you don't prep correctly it's not going to work well.

 
may not work so well for a deck but all my wood edging for my sidewalk i used some used motor oil and covered them all with that. Once it soaked in it actually looked like i stained them, 3 years later they still look like the day i installed them with no signs of rot.. Learned this trick from a old logger who used to do fences this way.. Not overly environmentally friendly but better that replacing rotten wood every 3-4 years

This isn’t the first time I’ve heard of this. I’ve heard people use it on trailer decks and patio decks as well. They said it was a little slick for a few days and then good for years. The motor oil will definitely protect it for years and years.

As an argument for how environmentally friendly it is they always said the stains used on decks aren’t environmentally friendly either. I personally think the motor oil probably is a little less friendly but it definitely works.