Do I need support brackets for 20' of chimney in a chase? What kind?

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jack26181

New Member
Feb 21, 2022
5
New York
Hello all. I'm installing two fireplaces, each in a chase with around 20' of chimney going straight up. There are no floors or attic to go through, just plywood fire stops with the metal shields in the middle to hold the pipe steady while maintaining proper clearance to combustibles. Should I add brackets to support the weight of the chimneys?

The store said to just let the fireplaces support the weight. The manual says to use brackets if the chimney is over 9' to prevent noise when the fireplace heats up. I'm inclined to follow the manual, but I'm less concerned about noise than safety. I bought two Selkirk Universal Roof Support Kits that can screw into the outer pipe wall and the wood. But I also see a DuraVent model that wraps around the pipe instead of screwing in. Any advice?

I saw a video that talked about the chimney expanding and contracting as it heats and cools, and now I'm wondering whether fixed support brackets will move with the pipe, or whether they might do more harm than good.

I'm using DuraTech 1" insulated chimney: a six-inch width for a Valcourt Lafayette fireplace, and 8" for a Valcourt Waterloo.

Thank you.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
102,443
South Puget Sound, WA
The fireplace will support the weight, but I'd follow the manual. It would be a pita to have to retrofit them later.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
11,331
Indiana
No alternate support is required in this situation.
 

webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
11,331
Indiana
You should make sure the fire stops are properly sealed and have adequate insulation on them. That’s the most important part and are most overlooked in new construction.