Does a Tee Snout pass through a Class A Chimney Pipe?

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Dajolu

New Member
Nov 27, 2023
64
New York
Looking at choice "B" on the attached photo. Is a tee snout considered the "Chimney connector" and can a class A chimney pipe be considered "listed factory build chimney length". If so does that mean a Tee Snout will pass through a class A Chimney pipe? These descriptions confuse me on what they mean by Factory Built Chimney connector.
 

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I thought you were running a liner down an 8x13 clay liner. If so, there may be no class A chimney involved. The t-snout gets connected to stovepipe which connects to the stove. It's very important at this point to pay attention to the pipe passing through the wall if there are any combustibles in the wall. Clearances must be safely maintained.

 
I thought you were running a liner down an 8x13 clay liner. If so, there may be no class A chimney involved. The t-snout gets connected to stovepipe which connects to the stove. It's very important at this point to pay attention to the pipe passing through the wall if there are any combustibles in the wall. Clearances must be safely maintained.


You are correct. I am running a liner an 8x13 clay flue. The Tee snout is going to pass through the masonry chimney that is bare and adjacent to an newly built alcove that will be tiled over so the snout will not be passing through or near combustibles. I was considering instead of cementing in a clay crock in the masonry for the snout to pass through, maybe use "factory built chimney length" for just some added insulation and wondered if cementing a length of Class a pipe in the masonry to use as a crock would work. Or is this just a totally wacky idea?
 
Can't comment without seeing some drawings that show clearances and wall construction of the alcove. This type of installation has very specific rules.
 
Can't comment without seeing some drawings that show clearances and wall construction of the alcove. This type of installation has very specific rules.

Excuse the poor drawing and it is not to scale. The alcove is built to the minimum alcove requirements set in the Green Mountain 60 manual. It is constructed using steel studs, covered in durock, will be covered in brick veneer on the outside and tiled on the inside of the alcove. The chimney as seen in the picture is 20"x24" exterior with a 1" gap from the siding of the house. Inside the Chimney is a 8x13 clay liner. I am going to run either a ridged or flexible liner down through the clay liner and have the snout go through the masonry and into the alcove. I was thinking if the snout was insulated some how it would just be better for the pass through but maybe not necessary at all.

Does a Tee Snout pass through a Class A Chimney Pipe?
 
A short 7" tile clay crock would work there for passing the snout through the chimney brick. Based on the drawing, there isn't a need for an insulated thimble.