Effecta Woodboiler

Craig Potvin Posted By Craig Potvin, Jun 12, 2019 at 2:34 PM

  1. Craig Potvin

    Craig Potvin
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    Feb 20, 2019
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    Looking for a set of ceramics for a Effecta 35 wood boiler. Thanks, Craig
     
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  2. Bad LP

    Bad LP
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    Tarm Biomass is your friend. 800 782 9927
     
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  3. Craig Potvin

    Craig Potvin
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    Feb 20, 2019
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    Trying to see if anyone has an extra set first. This is second set of ceramics in a little over 6 years and by time I get new new set delivered, that's pushing $900. I only use good dry hardwood and Effecta told me the ceramics should last 10 years, obviously there is a problem. The temp runs higher than it should and is destroying ceramics.
     
  4. Bad LP

    Bad LP
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    What does your dealer/installer say about it?
     
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  5. Craig Potvin

    Craig Potvin
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    I don't have a dealer anymore. Brian Crawford the Effecta dealer from East Jordan MI installed it almost 7 yrs ago, but he has since passed away. Effecta rep from Sweden has been real good trying to help me and sent me a new cartridge thermostat for pump, which seems to help. But I have a problem having to buy a second set of ceramics at almost $900 with shipping when the boiler is only a little over 6 yrs old. At what point do you just get a different boiler?
    I burn very seasoned dry wood, so that is not the issue. As a matter of fact, next years is all split and pilled.
     
  6. SpaceBus

    SpaceBus
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    One year out is not particularly seasoned for some species of trees. Oak and some maple species can take three or more years to season to 20% moisture content.
     
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  7. maple1

    maple1
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    What kind of wood do you burn?

     
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  8. Bad LP

    Bad LP
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    I'd also like to know the moisture content of the wood and I agree that going thru these parts is painfully expensive so something can't be right.

    I firmly believe that a reach out to Tarm asking some questions is in order. There are also some Effecta owners here that might offer some solid help. Unfortunately I don't know their names off the top of my head so keeping this thread alive can't hurt.
     
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  9. Craig Potvin

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    I use hard maple, beach and some ash. I may buy a tester now, but can't imagine it's going dry out much more.
     
  10. SpaceBus

    SpaceBus
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    You'd be surprised. I struggled with marginally dry firewood this past winter.
     
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  11. Craig Potvin

    Craig Potvin
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    Feb 20, 2019
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    Thanks, I was hoping to hear from a few other Effecta owners to see if they are experiencing anything similiar. I was hoping a dealer would start up somewhere near me, right now the nearest is 6 states away.
     
  12. Craig Potvin

    Craig Potvin
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    Do you have Effecta? Any ceramic problems?
     
  13. SpaceBus

    SpaceBus
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    I have a freestanding stove with refractory interior, not an effecta, and it suffered this winter. I have no doubt moisture contributed due to the location of the degradation.
     
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  14. JohnDolz

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    Have you tried to track down Jimmy Gilliam at Fort Faith Camp in Michigan? He bought out all of Brian's inventory in an effort to help Brian's family. I am not sure what he did with all of it. I do have an Effecta but the 65kw, I have been running it since Brian passed away (I forget how many years that is) with no issues. Hannes has been a great resource for me but as suggested Tarm has been awesome since they started carrying the Effecta line.
     
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  15. Craig Potvin

    Craig Potvin
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    Thanks John, I will see if I can track him down. Yes, Hannes has been very supportive, but Effecta is aware my boiler is running too hot during the burn cycles from the temps I have recorded and provided them. The ashes in the tray actually are petrified from getting so hot. The warranty is good for 2 yrs and my first set of ceramics went out in 3 years. Brian sold me a set of ceramics for his cost which I appreciated, but now have gone through a second set before the 7 yr mark. I'm not going to continue paying $900 ever 3 yrs for ceramics.
     
  16. JohnDolz

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    Completely understand that you wouldn't want to spend $900 every 3 years. Just curious, did Hannes have any suggestions as to why it is running so hot? I would think that is the problem to solve for which would get rid of the ceramic issue. How are you measuring the temps it is burning at? Possible that there is not enough water flow to remove heat?
     
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  17. Craig Potvin

    Craig Potvin
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    The temps are on the display screen. It is suppose to be 79-81 F. It gets up to 87 and according to Hannes, that is close to the auto shut off.
     
  18. JohnDolz

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    I am sure you meant 87C. Since the temp is coming from the display screen that is the boiler temp which correlates to the water temp coming out of the boiler ( I have a temperature gauge on the pipe coming out of my boiler and the water temp tends to be pretty close to the temp on the display screen). For what it is worth my boiler tends to run at about 80C until the storage temp rises and the return water coming in can no longer cool the boiler down to 80C. As my tanks "fill up" the temperature will continue to climb. If I am pushing to get my tanks to max I have gotten it up to 98C (just beyond that is where it shuts downs). Since this tends to be a normal pattern as you bring storage up to temp I am assuming that this is not what is happening in your case. I am guessing that you boiler temp "settles in" at 87 C and spends most of the burn there. My DISCLAIMER, I am a sales guy, someone else on the hearth can provide a lot more technical info but it sounds to me that you are not flowing enough water through the boiler. Not sure what size pipe was used or how it was run (i.e. too many turns constricting flow, storage too far away and the Laddomat cannot circulate sufficient water, etc.). Just my 2 cents, what was Hannes's opinion? How much storage do you have and how far into the burn are you hitting 87C?
     
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  19. maple1

    maple1
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    I would highly doubt that 87c boiler temps are reason for premature refractory wear, on their own.
     
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  20. maple1

    maple1
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    Re-read a bit again. I think I am suspecting your wood.

    I think it has been known that oak can be corrosive, and some boiler manuals actually warn against burning it. That was why I asked about what you burn, but it sounds like from what you said that shouldn't be an issue.

    Very curious about the petrified ash comment though. If anything, if it is too hot down there, ash should be more fly-ash like IMO. Not sure exactly what the petrified ash you mention looks like, but it sounds like you might be describing clinkers. Those usually form from mineral content in the wood and bark. I get the odd one, but nothing excessive. If you get a lot or quite a bit, your wood might have excessive minerals in it. Quite simply, it could be dirty. For example, don't know what your wood supply is, but sellers who process into piles then turn it over for drying or load a truck with a front end loader can pick up a lot of dirt - or if logs were skidded. Or there could be some kind of localized thing going on with wind & stuff in the air. Or have real odd soils? Another thing I was suspecting, was you maybe being near salt water, but that shouldn't be the case in Michigan. Driftwood can also be bad.

    Or it could not be seasoned enough. IMO two years minimum after cut split & stacked is needed for good hardwoods.
     
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  21. Craig Potvin

    Craig Potvin
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    Sorry I did mean 87C. The 87 usually comes in within 1/2 way of burn cycle. If the wood needs to be 2 yrs of drying, then that is a problem, although I can't imagine how much more it could dry. I put the wood in racks and it's a foot off the ground and covered. As far as dirt, that's my pet peeve, that is minimal.
    I'm sure some people do 2 years in advance for cutting wood, but hard to believe most do.
     
  22. salecker

    salecker
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    Get your self a moisture meter,split a few pieces and test.
    Then the wood question should be answered.
    Petrified ash could be result of recessive moisture.
     
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  23. maple1

    maple1
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    I am quite sure that anyone with a gasifier who has gone with 1 year seasoned then 2 will say there is a large difference. Myself being one. Step to 3 years, and there is another gain.

    I start with windfalls and end up with stacks of splits stacked double width up off the ground on concrete blocks and top covered, in a high open well exposed space. Even with those good conditions, burning with only 1 year seasoning would be a struggle. And that's a full year, not spring to fall.
     
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  24. JohnDolz

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    There is no doubt that dry wood is better. However in my experience with wet wood I ended up with lower boiler temps not higher. I actually had an Effecta 35kw before the 65kw and the 1st year I had it I struggled with not dry enough wood. The wood would bridge and the boiler would run cooler than it should have until some additional pieces broke free and dropped down - then the problem would repeat itself. There were times I was burning wood and putting water into storage that was cooler than the storage (at least the top) - it was a nightmare. The problem was magnified by the split size but of course like all 1st year guys I swore the wood was dry, the moisture meter even said so:). Not quite sure how that would impact the ceramics.
     
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  25. maple1

    maple1
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    Yes, also true, but we also don't know anything about the boiler setup/settings, or the system or how it is operated.
     
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