Ez boiler company in Michigan

Kubic40 Posted By Kubic40, Apr 12, 2019 at 10:09 PM

  1. Kubic40

    Kubic40
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    Jan 20, 2019
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    Anyone have any feedback on these boilers? They seems like a very simple design that works off a dampener and no blower. However I can't find any real reviews or testimonies on them in the ole Google.

    I know the classic design not a gasser. I've been second guessing paying $11,500 for a unit as I'm not rich by any means and tired of the $3k yearly propane bill.

    My wood supply is pretty much endless as the tree companies local to me basically beg you to take the wood from them.

    I know you burn a hole lot more with a classic stove vs the gasser but is it really that significantly less that it outweighs the extra $6k for a gasser and dozen more parts to break or malfunction.

    Maybe I'm just over thinking but man I can't get it out of my head.
     
  2. maple1

    maple1
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    Don't know about them. Got a link?

    If looking for an OWB, I would look at Heatmaster G series. Not sure on pricing though.
     
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  3. E Yoder

    E Yoder
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    Jan 27, 2017
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    E Z boiler used to be Ridgewood. You should be able to find reviews and info looking that up.
     
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  4. Eureka

    Eureka
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    Those look to be about as conventional as it gets. Cold fire in a tub of water with a fan in the door. If you want a conventional , as I did for several reasons, I’ll vouch for Heatmaster C series. They have an extra heat exchanger and an ash pan with shaker grates. The air comes in under the fire through the grates and creates a very hot and clean burn - about as close to gasification as a conventional will get. I’ve been very happy with mine and can still throw in splitter trash and oddball pieces, dry or not, although I split and stack all my firewood to dry. I wanted a conventional so I could burn up all the junk stuff and keep my processing area clean. I rake and shovel all my bark and little chunks right into the Heatmaster and it happily eats it up and leaves the ashes in the ash pan where I can simply slide it out and dump it.
     
  5. Eureka

    Eureka
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    And I can also burn coal, corn cobs, hay, walnuts, basically any biomass that will sit on the grates. Only thing I’ve found that isn’t worth it is sawdust and planer shavings from my shop, too much smoke and sparks while loading.
     
  6. Kubic40

    Kubic40
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    This situation exactly why I'm leaning towards a conventional, even though all my wood is free, I'd say about 40% is knobby, or wood grain is terrible to split and I end up just having a fire out back within all, I just filled a 20ft trailer with "junk" I couldn't split and it was eye opener. I have notice the MF SERIES and GS SERIES is pretty much the same cost when it comes down to equal heating abilities.
     
  7. blades

    blades
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    Note that the mfg. are getting around the new regs by listing the simplistic units as coal only. Make sure your local laws allow for ,not like mine where they banned owb units ( city slickers on rural boards- what a pia).
     
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  8. Kubic40

    Kubic40
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    The world's going soft sadly, everyone wants that fake back yard living but doesn't want to deal with the results that come with it. My neighbor has a old old burner that smokes like a 1920s train. Kinda jealous he got away from propane first lol
     
  9. JRHAWK9

    JRHAWK9
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    if you like smoke that much you can always pipe your OWB exhaust into your house. This way you can enjoy it w/o it affecting everyone else.
     
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  10. Kubic40

    Kubic40
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    No thanks that's why I enjoy living where neighbors arnt a factor...you city weirdos can stick to your selves
     
  11. SpaceBus

    SpaceBus
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    I'm not a city weirdo and I definitely don't like breathing smoke. In fact, as a country person you should demand cleaner air. After all, isn't that part of why the city sucks so much, the air is dirty and stinky. I love living in the country because the air is clean and unspoiled. I was like you and sought out antique wood stoves, but then realized how much smoke that I would have to breathe as a result. Needless to say I have one of those "city slicker" EPA approved wood stoves.

    If you don't want it pumped into your house, then you must understand how ridiculous you sound.
     
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  12. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu
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    Yeah I don't get it...its exactly this attitude, the "I wanna burn huge unseasoned (read: wet) chunks of trees...or whatever I please...because I live in the country by myself" that has gotten OWB's banned by many municipalities...and some rural areas too!
    I don't like the EPA micro-managing everything these days one bit (it directly affects my job too) but I say hooray for them clamping down on the OWB's...now they need to do away with the "coal burner" loophole!
    Its too bad its come to this though...now that the EPA has sunk their teeth into this they wont stop with good enough, they'll just keep clamping down until nobody can meet the standard...look at the wood furnace situation now...only one manufacturer that currently meets the standard. (well, two...but the second one kinda cheated IMO, and is certainly not the kind of wood heater that anybody wants to actually live with day to day!)
     
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  13. Eureka

    Eureka
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    I think the real problem is a large number of people burning wood aren’t doing it properly. Here and across the world. They don’t take the time or care to be educated or educate themselves on what works and tend to believe in the old myths of wood burning like green wood lasting longer or wood being too dry. I still hear it all the time. Wood burning technology has changed greatly but the basic fact that dry fuel burns better and more efficiently hasn’t, it’s just that the methods, devices, and beliefs haven’t allowed that fact to stand apparent.
    I have a non gasifier OWB that I was able to get through the coal loophole but I took the time to educate myself and install it and run it the best way possible. I prepare and burn dry fuel and clean and maintain the stove so that it runs at the best of its ability while producing the minimum amount of smoke and maximum amount of heat. Bonus for me is that I have the ability to use very low quality low BTU wood that would suck and make a mess in my EPA stove. The bark and splitter/yard trash that I burn smokes a lot for a few minutes but the stack clears right up after that and it burns clean. My splitting area is tidy and I figure it’s better practice than my old method of making a big pile of sticks and bark and burning that just to watch it go up in smoke.
    I’m heating over 5500 sq ft. and all my DHW in 2 buildings and definitely couldn’t even come close to affording the cost of propane for that. I love my indoor EPA stove but it overheats the large room it’s in and dries my house out like crazy when it’s not really cold out so now I use 100% in floor radiant and it’s comfortable and even. Stove still gets used for comfort when we’re below zero.
    I feel like I am a responsible wood burner doing the best to have a small environmental impact. I look around my area and see lots of OWBs as they’re widely accepted and honestly don’t see a lot of smoke so I’d say most aren’t doing too bad. Are there exceptions? Yes, my neighbor cuts/splits his green red oak off a log truck in November and his Central Boiler spews cold white smoke all winter long. I generally consider him to be an idiot in all aspects, but I can make my EPA stove do the same thing with damp wood and air closed, which goes back to my first point.
    If every wood burner burned like myself and most of us on Hearth.com this wouldn’t be such an issue. But if you really want to see some problems with pollution just Google ‘pollution in developing countries’. I truly believe that’s where efforts should be focused because our planet is literally being poisoned by industrial by products and ridiculously irresponsible unchecked use of natural resources.
     
  14. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu
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    @JRHAWK9 ...you city weirdo...;) ;lol
     
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