f400 dimensions

Chickenman1020

New Member
Dec 10, 2019
7
Maine
I was wondering if anyone with a Jotul f400 Castine can get me the dimension of the ash lip under the door. The dimensions in the manual show total depth including this lip, however I don't believe the ash lip is included in some of the minimum setback dimensions (16" from combustibles in front of stove)
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,958
South Puget Sound, WA
The clearance is measured from the door front.
 

Chickenman1020

New Member
Dec 10, 2019
7
Maine
That's what I thought. So I should be able to gain a few inches in the rear, I just need to know how much the size of that ash lip and I can't find it in the manual.
 

Mech e

Feeling the Heat
Feb 26, 2019
272
NorCal
www.dtengineer.com
I was wondering if anyone with a Jotul f400 Castine can get me the dimension of the ash lip under the door. The dimensions in the manual show total depth including this lip, however I don't believe the ash lip is included in some of the minimum setback dimensions (16" from combustibles in front of stove)
You can get a fairly accurate value by scaling the drawing they do have. Print the drawing, measure a known distance with calipers. Divide the known distance by the measured distance. This will yield the scale factor. Now measure the ash lip protrusion and multiply by the scale factor.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,958
South Puget Sound, WA
binary-44059-46181.png
This shot off the interwebs shows 127mm or 5".
 
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Chickenman1020

New Member
Dec 10, 2019
7
Maine
Thanks for the replies! I'm attaching the stove to an exterior masonry chimney, am I going to have a horrible time establishing a draft with this set-up or should it be manageable, just tougher to start up?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,958
South Puget Sound, WA
Thanks for the replies! I'm attaching the stove to an exterior masonry chimney, am I going to have a horrible time establishing a draft with this set-up or should it be manageable, just tougher to start up?
The stove should not be attached to the chimney. It should be attached to a 6" stainless, insulated liner of at least 16' in height to draft properly. To greatly reduce heat loss, there should be an insulated block-off plate sealing off the damper area. It wouldn't hurt to put a sheet of insulating material on the back wall of the fireplace either. 1" Micore or sheet Roxul would work.
 

Chickenman1020

New Member
Dec 10, 2019
7
Maine
Its not a fire place, I'm having a mason build a clay flu chimney with a through wall thimble purpose built for the stove. He said an 8x8 clay flu which measured 6.5x6.5 ID. Is there a way to further insulate a masonry chimney other than the air gap between the flu and the brick?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,958
South Puget Sound, WA
A metal chimney will be significantly better in performance and staying clean. Is there no possibility to go straight up thru the house?

How tall will this chimney be?
 

Chickenman1020

New Member
Dec 10, 2019
7
Maine
A metal chimney will be significantly better in performance and staying clean. Is there no possibility to go straight up thru the house?

How tall will this chimney be?
Going through the house was not an option. It would have to be routed through a bedroom then through the attic. I live in a typical colonial style house and the stove will be on the first floor. I’m guessing the chimney will be 25-30’
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,958
South Puget Sound, WA
OK, the height will help. The F400 like a good draft. I would still go for a metal chimney. It has insulation built-in, which will keep the flue gases hotter. This will improve the draft and reduce creosote accumulation. A masonry chimney of that height will need a good base, cost more, and will cool down the flue gases over its length.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,562
central pa
But don't have the mason put clay tiles in. Go with insulated stainless. It is far better in every way
 

Chickenman1020

New Member
Dec 10, 2019
7
Maine
Well unfortunately the mason starts tomorrow and I'm committed to the clay liner now. What would be my options if I'm not happy with the draft? Can an insulated liner be dropped right in? Or do they have to knock out the clay liner? Would it be an expensive replacement?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,958
South Puget Sound, WA
Well unfortunately the mason starts tomorrow and I'm committed to the clay liner now. What would be my options if I'm not happy with the draft? Can an insulated liner be dropped right in? Or do they have to knock out the clay liner? Would it be an expensive replacement?
With an 8x8 flue tile the options are going to be less. There isn't room for a 6" insulated liner in there. It will be 6.75 x 6.75" inside. Maybe a 5.5" will fit, but that is not the best solution. The best option is to cancel and do this with an insulated chimney. I suppose the mason could build a brick chase for the metal chimney once it is installed.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,562
central pa
Well unfortunately the mason starts tomorrow and I'm committed to the clay liner now. What would be my options if I'm not happy with the draft? Can an insulated liner be dropped right in? Or do they have to knock out the clay liner? Would it be an expensive replacement?
Tell him not to install the clay. Yes the clay would need to be removed in order to install an insulated liner later. If he does use clay liners be sure he has the required 1" clearance from the outside of the chimney and any combustibles. Also how is he passing through the wall?
 

Chickenman1020

New Member
Dec 10, 2019
7
Maine
I'm not sure how he is passing through the wall, I asked him about installing the thimble and he said he would take care of it all. The mason was recommended by my local dealer.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,562
central pa
Just make sure you check everything for code compliance. It is extremely rare for a mason to build a chimney to code. And if they don't make them tear it down and start over.