Flue Relined, First Fire With New Set Up!

BIGChrisNH

Minister of Fire
Dec 16, 2015
512
New Hampshire
Finally got my flue relined today. Backstory, I called in late August to have the flue cleaned and inspected, they were booking out to November (yikes). November came, they cleaned and inspected the flue. Found cracks behind and just above the thimble, and a tile high up that had shifted. Recommendation was not to burn until repairs had been made (huge bummer). I booked the repair/relining, that was booking out to January (yikes again). They showed up yesterday and removed all the old clay liner tiles, and installed a flexible stainless liner with insulation blanket wrapped in mesh, plus a new cap. Also installed a T at the bottom for cleaning, and cemented the clean out part of the pipe at the old clean out hatch right behind the stove to minimize any air leaks. 6" liner running up approximately 30-35 feet of chimney from the basement. Before, the clay liner was square, and measured 7.5" diagonally corner to corner. Just fired it up about a half hour ago for the first time with the new set up. Draft definitely pulls stronger, and the stovetop got up to over 600 degrees waaaay faster than it ever has, I was surprised, but I guess it makes sense that the smaller, new 6 inch pipe would pull harder. Very happy to have a fire again. Got a mix of pine, maple and oak in there now. Me and the old dog are happily sitting in front of it right now. Cheers everybody!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
83,695
South Puget Sound, WA
The smaller, properly sized pipe and warmer flue gases = better draft. You may find the flue stays cleaner too.
 

BIGChrisNH

Minister of Fire
Dec 16, 2015
512
New Hampshire
I hope that to be the case begreen. When I do my clean out in the spring I will keep you posted. It'll be nice and easy now, bottom up with a soot eater through the thimble. Definitely happy I've had this done, though I've got a new burning system to learn here now. If anything, day 1 seems easier in that the stove is up to temperature more quickly, and I can cut down air and set a nice slow, clean burn faster than I used to.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,160
Southern IN
That's a tall chimney, but if you can still control the stove with that much draft, that's great.
Having that chimney work done, and the safer insulated liner, gives you added peace of mind I'm sure.
 

BIGChrisNH

Minister of Fire
Dec 16, 2015
512
New Hampshire
That's a tall chimney, but if you can still control the stove with that much draft, that's great.
Having that chimney work done, and the safer insulated liner, gives you added peace of mind I'm sure.
I've thought about installing a damper, but I've never needed it. I do feel a lot more confident now with the safety of everything, you're right there. I also installed a camera downstairs so I can check in on the fire. I don't know how many times I've gone up to bed, gotten comfy, and then said "Did I turn the air down on the stove?", and then had to get up and go down to check. Now I can just look on my phone. Great christmas gift from my wife.
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
17,492
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
I run an NC30 too but usually aiming for high output. I'm curious about your flue temperatures with a strong draft. Do you measure flue temperatures.? If so, how and and what are you seeing?
 

BIGChrisNH

Minister of Fire
Dec 16, 2015
512
New Hampshire
I run an NC30 too but usually aiming for high output. I'm curious about your flue temperatures with a strong draft. Do you measure flue temperatures.? If so, how and and what are you seeing?
I just use an IR thermometer for surface temps of the stove and pipes. It goes up to 618 degrees or so max. Outside of the flue pipe 18 inches above the stove will be around 375 early into a good burn, cooling down to maybe 225 after an hour or so. I’m generalizing obviously but that’s pretty typical. I don’t have a probe style thermometer installed.
 

BIGChrisNH

Minister of Fire
Dec 16, 2015
512
New Hampshire
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here it is right now, the dog finally moved haha
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
17,492
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
View attachment 255815
here it is right now, the dog finally moved haha
Nice big hearth.

She got much hotter than 675. Paint baked off on the sides and top. You've been past 800!

I too run the flue surface up to just under 400 and then spend a lot of time closer to 300 before the load starts to dwindle to just coals. My stack is only 20 feet tall but has 10 feet of single wall!
 

BIGChrisNH

Minister of Fire
Dec 16, 2015
512
New Hampshire
Well, the discoloration on top is mostly from the fact I used to keep a kettle on there filled with water that was always spitting all over the stovetop
 

BIGChrisNH

Minister of Fire
Dec 16, 2015
512
New Hampshire
And thanks about the hearth, can’t take credit for it though it was here when we bought the place
 

BIGChrisNH

Minister of Fire
Dec 16, 2015
512
New Hampshire
Now that it’s colder out, this 6 inch flue pulls HARD, I’ve had to cut my air setting in half on the Englander to control the burn. And I’m getting more coals left in the morning for reloads.
 

Woody Stover

Minister of Fire
Dec 25, 2010
12,160
Southern IN
Now that it’s colder out, this 6 inch flue pulls HARD, I’ve had to cut my air setting in half on the Englander to control the burn. And I’m getting more coals left in the morning for reloads.
I imagine the turns in the connector pipe are helping tone down the draft, a little at least..