Gasification vs. non-Gasification

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noiruuk

New Member
Oct 1, 2008
26
PA
I'm looking at indoor wood furnaces as a supplemental heat source for my new home. I have a chimney installed and an area in my basement to put whatever unit I purchase.

I've been mainly looking at the standard wood furnace, but gasification intrigues me. Are all gasification-type heaters a "boiler"? The standard wood furnaces I've been looking at all will hook directly into my existing ductwork and there's no plumbing involved. Are there non-plumbing gasification furnaces? Do they exist or is that just a dumb question? Is there a way to use a gasification boiler with a forced-air heated home?

Any advice will be greatly appreciated! :)
 

noiruuk

New Member
Oct 1, 2008
26
PA
Thanks for the response! I didn't see, however, anywhere on those models where I would hook it up to my ductwork. I also failed to mention that my flue is 6", and those models appear to need 8"...I was told I shouldn't put in a reducer.
 

webbie

Seasoned Moderator
Nov 17, 2005
12,184
Western Mass.
Not a dumb question...
let's start with definitions...

Furnace : Hot air system (usually duct work)
Boiler or Hydronic Heater : Water system

Most high efficiency units on the market today are Hot Water.
But, there is at least one and maybe more high efficiency hot air units.
Example: http://tinyurl.com/496soz

You can also tie ANY hot water boiler into a hot air system - expensive solution, but works really well. This is done with a copper coil in the duct work which exchanges the heat from the boiler to your hot air system.
 

Eric Johnson

Mod Emeritus
Nov 18, 2005
5,871
Central NYS
You can use a boiler to heat a forced air system, but you need a water-to-air heat exchanger. Not very expensive and I think they work well.

On the pipe size, it depends on what the mfg. says. By code, you can't hook an 8" flue up to a 6" chimney unless the manual and/or mfg. specifically states that it's OK. I know that some EconoBurn models have 8" exhaust openings but can be used with a 6" pipe. It depends on the boiler's capacity and how it was designed.
 

WoodNotOil

Minister of Fire
If you have money upfront to afford it, gasification is generally the most efficient and least costly in the long run way to go. The cost is higher upfront, but uses less wood and gives more flexibility. Installing a hot water system with plenum exchange works really well and gives you the flexibility later to add radiant floors, radiators, and baseboards for supplemental heat or for new additions.
 

noiruuk

New Member
Oct 1, 2008
26
PA
Thanks for the education! Now that I know a boiler can easily (relatively) be used for a forced-air application, that opens up possibilities! I guess I'd have to narrow them down to 6" flue, or put in a reducer if the manufacturer says it's not an issue.

Webmaster, I couldn't find much info about PSG furnaces other than what was on that retailer's page. I didn't see where the one you linked was gasification...did I miss it or is it not? Or does it matter if it's high-efficiency? The main reason gasification appeals is no creosote build-up...that seems much more safe for my family.
 

mlyons

New Member
Sep 26, 2008
7
South West CT
Another option is the Farenheit Technologies pellet furnace. It was a 2007 Vesta Award finalist (but didnt win).
You can put upto 250lbs of pellets into the (optional expanded) hopper. It is UL listed and makes up to 50,000 BTU/hr.
I dont have one or know anybody who has one, but here is the link: http://www.fahrenheittech.com/
 

PatrickAHS

New Member
Oct 1, 2008
25
AHS Factory
noiruuk said:
Thanks for the response! I didn't see, however, anywhere on those models where I would hook it up to my ductwork. I also failed to mention that my flue is 6", and those models appear to need 8"...I was told I shouldn't put in a reducer.
We offer a Wood Gasification Boiler with a 6" flue here at Alternate Heating Systems.
 

glacialhills

Member
Jun 5, 2008
222
S.W. Michigan

Duetech

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2008
1,436
S/W MI
One thing you need to know about gasifier boilers. They are very heavy. You will need equipment to move them and plenty of room to maneuver. Mine weighs around 1300 lbs and I don't imagine many of them weigh less than 600 lbs. Mine's in my garage and now I wouldn't have another wood furnace. I use an air/water heat exchanger that mounts directly in to my furnace plenum. The whole house stays around 72 f all winter and burns much less than the wood furnace I used to have...Cave2k
 

jebatty

Minister of Fire
Jan 1, 2008
5,745
Northern MN
The Tarm Solo Plus 40 may be used with a 6" flue, which I have.
 

stee6043

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2008
2,648
West Michigan
There are several folks around here running EKO 40's with 6" flues as well.

And the note above about weight is important. It took me three men, one boy and a Cub Cadet to get my EKO off a trailer and into my basement. If you have some kind of front end loading tractor or fork truck it would be a lot easier. If you don't have access to the big toys make sure you plan on spending the better part of a day getting her moved...
 

Birdman

New Member
May 21, 2008
278
NH
I bought a Tarm 40 recently. It is heavy.... over 1000 pounds.. but it was not that hard to move. If you have a good sized tractor(. or a friend... neighbor.. farmer with one)... then it can be easliy moved around in the bucket. Find some rugged pipe to put it on and away you roll. Getting down a bulkhead... that would be a different story, one I can't help with since I have a walkout basement and did not encounter that issue.
 

garysec

Member
Sep 29, 2008
26
NEK of Vt
I will be putting a Tarm Solo Plus 30 thru a bulkhead hopefully in a couple weeks. I'll let you know how bad it was.
 
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