Guidance on new build fireplace/stove.

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jjs

New Member
Aug 2, 2021
7
MN
Hi and Thank you in advance for any help. I've skimmed through lots of these threads and can't really find anything similar to my questions.

Little background, I have been in my house for 21 years, it has a fireplace footing that was part of the original construction, house was built in 1992. A couple weeks ago my laundry room floor drain became clogged so the brine tank discharge was basically just running into the hallway carpet and being sucked into door jambs and some sheet rock. I cut out the carpet that was wet and have been running some fans for the last couple weeks to make sure it dries.
So now I am wondering what to do with the floor, I have pretty much settled on a Pergo or luxury vinyl plank. But ever since I moved in I have always wanted a fireplace, I grew up with a fireplace and love a nice fire. So since I have to tear out the carpet I figured now is the time to get the fireplace. I have learned quite a bit from this site and everyone here, but I have some questions I need help with.
I'm not looking to heat my house with this but it would be nice to have it heat the downstairs while in use since it's already cold down there in the winter and now that I'm removing the carpet and putting Pergo or vinyl it will be worse. If I get residual heat up stairs that's great but not important.
I also intend to do everything myself, with help.
My budget is 4000 for everything having to do with fireplace and installation(this is my perfect scenario, I can buy stuff in stages and have it take longer than intended if I'm way out of line or you guys convince me I need to spend more).
Basement is 650sq.ft.

I really want to burn wood. But if I can't be somewhere around my budget doing that then I will consider gas(not sure how much it will cost to run the line). Do I get an open fireplace? I prefer one with the door seals and a fan but they seem to be twice as much as the open fireplaces. I know that the open fireplace will probably make it colder down there except for right next to the FP. Is there a sealed unit that I can afford? Do I or can I even put a wood stove tucked into the nook the footing provides?
I guess I will just start with that question.
Thanks for the help everyone, I kind of gave myself information overload!
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,608
Long Island NY
For the bigger experts than me to be able to help, we'd need some pictures, measurements (how tall to the roof) etc.

Note that a class A chimney will likely cost as much as the stove (I'd advise against an open fireplace - nice for only flames but barely any heat).
 

jjs

New Member
Aug 2, 2021
7
MN
Thanks for commenting, I was starting to get the feeling I wasn't going to get any help. Tomorrow I can measure to the roof. I'm not sure what pics you would like, there is a a finished wall across the fireplace footing opening. The outside width of the footing was just over 5 feet.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,608
Long Island NY
Pics and sizes of where the thing needs to go. Width, depth, height.
Is there a chimney ready? If so, it likely will need to be lined (for an insert or stove).

Is the basement insulated? If not, you'll waste a large part of the heat right there. And that affects much how big a stove you'd need. (Again, fireplaces don't provide much heat.)

Then, see if you can find a stove you (aesthetically) like and find the requirements for the chimney for that stove.

Oh, and start getting wood split, stacked, and covered now. Most wood needs two years to dry to have a modern stove burn well.

Finally, doing it yourself is tricky; you seem to need to learn lot (that's fine!), but there are legal (insurance may require professional install!), code (town, inspection!), and safety (clearance to combustibles, draft and carbon monoxide) issues. Are you certain you can do this yourself without endangering you and your family? Serious business, having a fire inside your house!
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,608
Long Island NY

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
25,667
central pa
Honestly I would say the budget really is not realistic. Even a basic builders box prefab fireplace would be stressing that budget and I would absolutely recommend against installing one of them.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,791
South Puget Sound, WA
Nothing to add. I agree. My thought is that the budget is not realistic except for a DIY wood stove install.
 

jjs

New Member
Aug 2, 2021
7
MN
Thanks for the replies so far. Like I said I am willing to buy stuff and do the building and install next year after I can get all the materials. It's just me so I don't have anyone to complain it's not done.
There is no chimney, just the outside footing. Basement is finished and insulated, I would need to cut out the studs and sheet rock where the FP footing is. Then I will need to build the chase on the outside of the house and run the appropriate pipe etc.
I know I can buy a fireplace with the insulated door for around 3500, why is just the door 1000 dollars? I was hoping maybe someone would tell me where I might find a cheaper one.
Can I even put a stand alone wood stove into the nook created by the FP footing?
The FP footing sticks out from the house 24" X 64" wide.
I am not able to get on the roof but measured as high as I could and it's about 20' from the peak to top of the concrete in the pick.

Again, I'm not looking to heat my home but I don't really want to suck heat out either. I have Forced air furnace and my bill is only about 45 dollars a month.
This is more for recreational and looks, but seeing as I'm going to be removing the carpet and going Pergo or vinyl plank it would be nice to have it heat the room a little if possible.
I guess I was hoping for some suggestions etc.
I'm not afraid to build this, you frame it keeping the recommended distances away from combustibles and using proper materials. It's not like I'm doing masonry work.
It will be getting inspected etc.
 

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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,608
Long Island NY
I don't know enough about fireplaces - other than that I would not want one. Clearances in building one etc are critical.

Note that a fireplace is not an insert is not a stove.

My advice is to buy a good budget stove drolet?), get a class A chimney, read up on clearances, thimbles, design something, talk to your town inspector, and if he approves of the design (with final approval of course only after the build), then talk to your insurance. Would be a shame to do a lot of work yourself and then have a professional correct it either for good reason or "because it should have been a professional install" according to the town or insurance.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,254
SE North Carolina
luxury vinyl plank
This. Water proof. Not cold under foot. Installed both cheap and expensive LVP. Expensive was more difficult to install. But had a better feel under foot. Floor must be LEVEL.

I think you should look into a stove over fireplace. It gives you more options. Hearth can be built to fit more decors.
Evan
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,791
South Puget Sound, WA
Thanks for the advice stoveliker, I appreciate it. Hopefully bholler and begreen will chime in a littler more. I thought there where a couple wood fireplaces that were one unit, like this one.
Not a bad choice, but it's not going to work with the $4k budget. It's $3200 plus tax with the faceplate added. Then it will need a proper chase framed, insulated and clad, plus the chimney pipe, top plate and chimney cap. That's more like a $7-8000 project not including interior finish work.
 

jjs

New Member
Aug 2, 2021
7
MN
Right, I understand that, as I've said 4000 was a perfect scenario. I've also asked if I could do a wood stove etc. Lets consider the 4000 for stove, pipe etc. The framing, siding, wall finishing etc, don't worry about.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
25,667
central pa
Right, I understand that, as I've said 4000 was a perfect scenario. I've also asked if I could do a wood stove etc. Lets consider the 4000 for stove, pipe etc. The framing, siding, wall finishing etc, don't worry about.
You would be able to do a budget stove and chimney install yourself for $4000.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,791
South Puget Sound, WA
Yes, with a good value stove from Century, Drolet, Englander, True North, etc. you could do this in that budget.
 

NickW

Minister of Fire
Oct 16, 2019
520
SE WI
I installed a new Summers Heat SNC30, put in new double wall stovepipe and re-lined my chimney with an insulated liner in January of 2020 for about $2500. The Stratford II zc fireplace and class A chimney pipe I am currently putting in our cabin was around $5500 not including framing, chase or finishes...