Hearth Extension Question and Recommendation

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Sandblast8365

New Member
Aug 20, 2022
4
VA
Hi all,

I am looking to add a wood stove into my existing fireplace. I like the look and size of the Heathstone Manchester, but the sideloading door would be useless in the fireplace. I'd like to select a stove eligible for the tax credit, but think I would prefer a non-cat stove. I had a cat insert at my old home, and it could be somewhat temperamental to run.

Question. My fireplace is 38.5" from back wall to edge of the hearth. The hearth is 13" above the floor. Am I correct to assume that if I wanted to select a larger in depth stove, like Lopi Liberty or PE Alderlea T6 that are approximately 25" deep, I would need ember protection?

I appreciate any input.

Thanks.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,415
South Puget Sound, WA
Correct. If the stove only requires ember protection, then hearth protection that extends to 16" in front of the door can be as simple as a sheet of 24 ga metal or fancier if desired.

One caveat could be the mantel if combustible. Big stoves like this are not often put in fireplaces due to their height. That means there are no documented mantel clearances. This is not an issue with a non-combustible mantel, but would be if the mantel is made of wood. If this is an issue, then a big insert like the Osburn 3500 might be a good alternative.
 
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Sandblast8365

New Member
Aug 20, 2022
4
VA
Thank you. The fireplace is very large with an arched opening and no mantel. An insert wouldn’t work without masonry work, I don’t think.

I am getting the stove for heat, but it won’t be the primary heat source. Ambiance and aesthetics are as important if not more.

Any thoughts if a non cat stove would better fit the bill, or is the Manchester a decent option?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,415
South Puget Sound, WA
Cool, then it can work. The big Osburn 3500 freestander could also work. Regardless of choice, get the blower option for best performance.

AFAIK, all Hearthstone stoves are cat now.
 

Sandblast8365

New Member
Aug 20, 2022
4
VA
Thanks. I will definitely be getting a blower,

Next decision is if I want to forgo the tax credit. I am really settling on the Manchester due to the credit, but would prefer the Lopi Liberty or Jotul F55v2.

It looks like the Jotul has positive reviews. Any thoughts on the Lopi? I am also checking to see if the vendor can get a PE T6 which looks nice but want in the showroom.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
96,415
South Puget Sound, WA
The Alderlea T6 was one of the first 2020-compliant stoves. It's got a good track record. I helped install one at neighbors and they love it. We have only had a couple reports on the NexGen Liberty but they were definitely positive. Lopi made some nice improvements to the newest model. I don't recall hearing anything negative about the F55v2, but haven't read any reports. The F55v1 in general was a nicely finished, well-made stove and a good heater. Their F45 has received good praise.
Note that none of these stoves make the tax credit cutoff, some are just 1% off so it's not an efficiency issue, more of a line in the sand.
 
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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
6,284
Long Island NY
I see no particular type of technology "fit the bill better" from what you want. Just get a good stove (see begreen's suggestions) that the S.O. likes to look at and install it safely.

Note that the tax credit also would apply to an (insulated) liner in the chimney.
Has the chimney been inspected? Is it lined? Does it have 2" clearance from the outside of the masonry to any combustibles (drywall, studs)? If you can't see this easily, an insulated liner (after thorough cleaning of the chimney) would bring it up to code - and increase performance of the stove.
 

Sandblast8365

New Member
Aug 20, 2022
4
VA
Thanks. Chimney currently terra cotta but will be getting an insulated stainless steel liner. That’s the part that is impacting the decision the most. Install plus liner is more costly than the stove itself so the tax credit would be nice.
 
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